Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 26, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 26, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Much as oil regrefr the droft the news from o dozen trouble spofrt around the world makes it evident Uncle So m simply dare nor let down hit guard for quire some time Atfraie July Paid Circulation 8407 Member: Audit Hurtau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 112 Ada Receives Heaviest Rain Over State Stock Pondi Filled, Postures Aided By Heavy Rainfall General Over State Any remaining indications o: drouth were washed away in Pontoloe county by heavy rain- ia'il Sunday night and Mondaj ir.orr.ing. By T o'clock Monday morning government gauge at Ada had registered 3.81 inches, heaviest 3-epc.rlt-d in the state1, and the after that reading is cx- pecled to send the one-rain total to or above four inches. According to the Associated Press, rains fell over much of the Mate during tho night. Guthrie had 3.46 inches. Pauls Valley 3.09 and Altus 3.12 inches. Stock Ponrt.s Kilted For :his county the rain, beat- ing down heavily for hours after starling a little before !l p.m., sent ivjiter back into stock ponds that run low on water, and gave H-'.U.-CS another boost. The rity lake in Winlorsmilh from which most of the water had been drained for a i-al- cutting and moss-dragging operation, was reported back to nc'.-mul levels after water from ihe rain poured into the lake. Heavy thunder and crashing lightning accompanied the rain during its early hours here. Hail Dam.ige At Bethany Some hail accompanied rains fn the state but the only damage reported was at Bethany, where Trees, signs and roofs were bat- tered. Some scattered areas were re- ported trussed but for the most the rain was general. One train coming south from Tulsa was said here to have been blocked Sunday by high water between Wetumka and Welectka. Other rainfall reports over Ok- lahoma included: Chic-kasha 2.51, Enid 2.45. Tulsa 2.28, Idabel 2.3G. Frederick 1.00, La-.vton 1.70, Oklahoma City 1.26, "VVaynoka 1.65. Okmulgee 1.21, A.-dmore 1.37, McAlester 1.14, Wau.-ika .65. Alva .06. Bcnvct .56. Chnton .45, Elk City .36, Gage .68. Guymon Bartlesvillc .09 MuskoRec .58, Xewkirk .25. Pon- ca City .52, Sallisaw .42, Vinita .22. John T, Cooper Dies At Wewoka Two of Daughters Grad- uates of East Central ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, AUGUST 26, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Judge John T. Cooper. 65, ol "vi'e-.voka died Sunday afternoon after having suffered from an at- l.i. k df roronaiy thrombosis since niid-Jiijio. lie has been a resident c.' Mure nnd had fru-nJs in Acln and other cii.es of this area. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 2 p.m. from the Chris- church in Wewoka, burial at "Wen-oka to follo.w. fine daughter, Mrs. Jtianila BetiKc. Wfwokii. is ;t former so- editor of The Ada News; nn- d n u K h t e r. Mrs. K. B. lives at Odessa, Tex., and a third. Mrs. W. T. Loman, at survive. Walter of Tex., nnd John T. Coop- er. Jr., who made n brilliant corn- hit jccord in Europe and is now vitn the Veterans Administration an Denver. The widow also sur- vives. Mrs. Lonian and Mrs. Be.nge graduates of Kast Central college here. Picnic Cancelled The Southern Division P.IT.IC scheduled for Sulphur Tuesday afternoon has been can- ceJU-d for the time being. Rain v.-as still falling at Sulphur Mon- day afternoon. Shawni'p. Two sons Draft Again Into Action Reception Lines Begin To Form Next Week; Fewer Deferments Authorised Now By KDWARD E. BOMAR WASHINGTON, Aug. presidential "greetings are in the mails again. Shut down lor two months, th draft machinery is chugging bad into action. Reception center lines will be gin to form next week. And by the end of September selectiv service is reasonably confident i will meet the army's quota o men in the 19-29 age group in June, while the whole fu lure of the draft was up in th( air, only men were induct ed. There were no teen ager among them. Congress finally comproniised on that issue by exempting 18 year olds but spe" cifying those 19 were to be drafted. Classifying 18-44 Men During the July-August holi- day when the war dcpartmen iskcd no inductions, local boards inve been registering and clas- sifying men between IB and 4< inder instructions from Maj. !en. Lewis B. Hershey, nationa director, to limit deferments to ndividuals in activities "indis- pensable" to the "national'exist- ice." Four new categories have just been added to the list of those to "most serious consid- Talion" for occupational defer- nenls. They are college and uni- teachers, home construc- ion workers, critical production nd transportation workers. Previously local boards were uthorized to consider defer- ncnts only for students in rnedi- ine, denistry, veterinary medi- ine and osteopathy, and for cer- ain teachers and research work- rs in physical sciences and en- ineering. Fathers Deferred Fathers, certain categories of eterans and essential agricultu- al workers are deferred by law. ightcen year olds must register but are not subject to induction until they reach 19. For the present at least, the army says it wants no one over (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) British Searching Jewish Village For 'Frog Men' SEOOT, YAM, Palestine, Aug. hundred residents of this tiny Jewish fishing vil- lage were rounded up by British troops and Palestine police this morning in a move said by offi- cers to be directed at finding the "frog men" who almost succced- f'd in .sinking the immigrant Iriinspnrl Kmpire Klvtil in Hiiifn mirbor lust u-oi-k. The village was surrounded by' a brigade unit before dawn and the villagers were herded into barbed wire enclosures for ques- tioning by police while army searched homes and build- ups. Mine detector equipment inn dogs formerly used for mine tloU'ction in Germany wore usec n the; search. n. H. Anderson, com- nnnder of the second brigade who was in charge of the oper- ition, said the village -was cut off Jt-fore dawn and "we believe (the was a complete surprise to the villagers. Me said the village, only five miles from Haifa, was one of the bases for persons who blastec Ihe ship and added: "We know the village has harbored illegal forces. Villagers said the search was the second conducted here. They added that the'first search was that today's AMERICAN FLIERS RELEASED BY YUGOSLAVIA: Seven Americans Europeans detained in Yugoslavia for nearly two weeks after their C-47 transport plane was forced down by Yugoslav fighter pianos, August 9, are shown at U. S. 88th Division headquarters in Gorizia Italy in the first pictures made since their release. Standing, left to right: Capt. William Crombie, East Longmeadow Mass Joseph Hochecker, Chicago; Lt. Donald Carrol, Elgin, 111.; Cpl. Robert Dahlgren, Cicero' 111.; Lt. Wiliam McNew, Atlanta, Ga.; Cpl. John Dick, McKeesport, Pa.; Front, Raymond Blackburn Clayton, Ohio; and Drs. Alabar Palley and Arthur Lederer, both of Hungary. (NBA Radio Telephoto) Georgia Unit Vote Upheld Federal Court Turns Down Challenge Attacking County Unit Vote System ATLANTA, Aug. 26. A iree-judge federal court upheld oday Georgia's county unit vote ystem of deciding Democratic rimary elections and refused to nvalidate nomination of Eugene "'almadge to a fourth term as overnor. The tribunal dismissed a suit t an Emory university professor nd an -Atlanta woman civic eader which sought to have the nit system declared void and he nomination of Talmadge can- clled. The judges said it was their nanimous opinion that "an in- srlocutory injunction should be New Riots In Simla Today Sir Ahmad Khan, Member Of New Indian Government, Stabbed Seven Times NEW DELHI, Aug. The Hindustan Times, edited by Devadas Gandhi, hinted today at possible congress party reprisals against the Moslem league which it blamed for political violence. Commenting on t h e stabbing Cattle Jam 0. C. Market Martineau Sayt No Man Can Feed Highcost Grain To Low-Priced Livestock OKDAHOMA CITY, Aug. and calves jammed the Oklahoma City livestock mar- ket today in a record breaking of Sir Shafa'at Ahmad Khan, a j run totalling approximately The opinion said "these unit made June 30. Anderson said MERIT SYSTEM APPROVED OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. amendment to the Mus- V.opee city charter establishing a :ric-rit system for virtually all mu- employes except those in ihe fire department was approv- ed tudjiv by acting E. Bi-rrv. Governor The jinicndinont was submitted to Muf.kogoc voters April 2 and 2.C77 1o 969, according to Berry's proclamation filed with -.he of state. Aug. Df.r-.vin Farmer. Chickasha, has be-en named athletic coach and st--. rr.th an dfighth grade teacher :r. '.r.e Gracemont school. Farmer a well known athlete while attending Oklahoma Baptist uni- at Shawnee. DURAXT, AUK. genera! meeting of the Bryan t-oun'y breeders' association will be held here Thursday to elect offic-i-.-s. and discuss plans for the 29i7 hvi-fU'ck show. uu.I kllUI. LUllcly S roundup was aimed only at per- sons connected with the explo- sion, and was not for explosive materials, arms or illegal immi- grants. Villagers marched quietly to hastily erected wire enclosures and answered questions by Brit- ish authorities. The military operation follow- ed the pattern of u full-scale in- vasion. Linos of troop-carrying trucks, field kitchens, radio com- munication systems and first aid facilities stood among the scat- tered rubble of an ancient Roman fortress. Seek Freedom For Slayer of Husband was held on a murder charge to- il ay after, a prosecuting officer said, she shot her divorced uni- versity professor husband upon finding a newspaper photograph or another woman in his wallet. otes also appear in the electoral ollege in choosing a president, o that there have b'een presi- ents who did not receive a ma- jority of the popular vote." In the July 17 Democratic pri- mary, Tnlnindgc! won the nomin- ation tinder I.he unit voto system although he trailed James V. Carmichael, backed by Governor Ellis by about votes in the statewide popular vote total. Under the unit vote system, each county is allocated a desig- nated number oC unit from two to six. The candidate receiving Ihe most popular votes in :i county receives its unit votes. There are 4.10 unit votes in the slate and 206 are required to nominate. In- the suit, Dr. Cullen B. Gos- nell of Emory and Mrs, Robert non-league Moslem appointed to the congress-formed interim gov- ernment for India, the Hindustan Times said "violence is a game at which two can play." Sir Shafa'at- was reported re- covering today from seven stab wounds by two mnknown assail- ants. The Times editor's father, Mo- handas K. Gandhi, writing in his weekly newspaper Harijan, de- clared "the way to Pakistan (an independent Moslem state de- manded by the league) does not lie through senseless violence." A strict curfew continued in old Delhi where five were killed and 70 injured in bazaar riots Saturday night in a jnew out- break of dissatisfaction by Mos- lems over forirmlion of the .now government.-Another person was killed by Allahabad last night. The 53-year-old Sir ShaJ'at was said by Simla police to have been attacked by two young men while walking home, five hours after his appointment to the new government had been announced. We had resigned from the Moslem league a few days ngo, reportedly because he refused to drop his tit.le in accord with league policy. Until 1944 he had been Indian iigh commissioner for South Africa. 500. Of this number were cat- tle, hogs. Bill Martineau, editor of the Livestock News, termed the run "a wave of farm liquidation a- head of OPA ceilings." The farmers, Martineua saic "are just calling the bluff of Pau Porter, OPA administrator. "Porter said they were going to put ceilings back to where the; were on June 30, when no man could feed highcost grain to low priced livestock and were going to throw the book at the farmer "Porter said they were going to put snoopers out on th< farmers and so they've just de cided to get out of trie meat bus iness utnil the government do Bring Bodies Of Fliers To Belgrade Yugoslav Officers Form Honor Guard; Searchers Decide Four Bodies Found By GEORGE PALMER BELGRADE, Aug. The bodies of Ai.ierican fliers who perished Aug. 19 when a second United States transport was shot down were brought from the Julian Alps mountains to Ljubljana today under an honor guard escort of the Yugo- slav Fourth army. Four coffins draped with American flags placed aboard a United States-made weapons carrier after the re- mains of the airmen were re- examined today at the village of Koprivnik, scene of their mass burial by Yugoslav peasants. Decide Four Bodies Found An exhaustive examination b United States grave registratio representatives and two Yugo slav doctors ascertained that it almost certain" the remains four bodies were disinterre from the grave in tiny Holy Cros church cemetery, said Lt. Co Chester M. Stratton, U. S. assist ant military attache. Previously it had been report ed that only three American were buried there. Stratton said bits of .wreckag of the C-47 shot down in flame by Yugoslav fighters will b moved in hopes of finding th fifth body. Search parties hav combed the mountains for without result. Yugoslavs In Honor Guard The cavalcade which trans ported the four coffins throug! the resort town of Bled to Ljubl jana was organized by the com manding general of the Yugo slav Fourth army, Lt. Gen. Dan ilo Lekic, in whose area the twc U. S. planes were downed. Th column consisted six German command cars anc two jeeps. Riding in the procession were 30 officers of the Fourth arm and of the making up Wants Russia To Justify Demands For Reparations Australian Also Asks On-Spor Checkup On Ability Pay; Molotor Says Australia Wasn't Devastated ly War By ROBERT EUNSON PARIS, Aug. Australian delegate to peace conference today proposed that Russia be called upon to "justify her reparations and asked that a special "on the spot investigation" be made of the ability of her European enemy nations to pay the Soviet's demands. to qu w. L nit trying to run it." L AWT ON, Aug. Lee Turmfln, former president of Cameron college officials announ- the Atlanta League 61. Women ced tho school is facing an acute voters, contended' that the sys- tem violated the equal rights provision of the fourteenth amendment to the U. S. consti- tution. They said a vote in a small county allotted two unit votes would have perhaps as much as 100 times the value as a vote in Fulton (Atlanta) county, arbi- trarily pegged at six unit votes. housing shortage and needs at least 200 more rooms.' Ail avail- able space in dormitories already has been reserved. GUYMON, Aug. three-day horse racing program will highlight the 16th annual Texas county and panhandle dis- trict free fair to be held here Sept. 17-20. A. W. Locn.s, manager of the National Livestock Commission company, said "We'll sell all the cattle that we can move, get kill- ed and get sold before the OPA ceilings go into effect without penalty, Then No Meat for Time "Then be without meat for a while. Those good ruins, will let some ranchers keep then cattle out on grass and wheat pas- ture during the winter, but we won't be seeing them after this Hood." A large percentage of the cattle were unfinished, indicating a run by stockmen to make sure of present high prices rather than to hold cattle and sell later at OPA ceilings. Martineau estimated that if the prices revert to the June 30 lev- els, it will mean a cut in prices here from a. hundred now be- ing paid lor hogs to and a slash of from to a (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) September Elections Bring In National FiguresOff48-'52 By JACK BELL AP Political Reporter WASHINGTON, Aug. -Political leaders who may fig- ure in the 1948 and 1952 presiden- :ial races are cast in leading roles 'or September's windup of ma- 'or primaries and party conven- .ions. A republican party meeting to adopt a state platform in Nebras- ca toddy and a congress race run- off for the democratic nomination n the Seventh Mississippi district omorrow are the only political events scheduled this week. In the Mississippi race, Rep. Dan R, McGehee is contesting with John Bell Williams, a one- armed war veteran. Nebraska epublicans hear a keynote Chief Deputy Prosecuting At- peech this afternoon by Senator .orncy Otis H. Nixon quoted Mrs. Chapman Revercomb tschweilor as saying she drew wno is mentioned as a potential WEATHER! Oklahoma: Showers tonight .-id Tuesday except partly cloudy wi.rmei panhandle Tuesday. pistol .from her handbag and shot her 43-year old ex-husband in his room after he had visited her apartment Friday night. Attorney Fred A. Isgrig said he would ask Circuit Judge Gus Fulk today to authorize -Mrs. Eschwciler's release on bond, Nixon, however, declined to say immediately whether he would resist her release. potential vice presidential candidate two years from now. Two Texas Vets Win Last week's political bill closed with Texas democrats picking Beauford H. Jester as the state's next governor in a run-off pri- mary with Homer P, Rniney, for- mer University of Texas presi- dent. Two veteran house mem- bers also won renornination. which mean's the election in Tex- as. They are Reps. Joseph J. Mansfield and ,Milton H. West. Next New York and Connecticut conventions share in- terest with Maine's customary advance-date general election in the last whirlwind of party prep- arations for the final showdown November 5. In New York, the republicans meet at Saratoga September 3 and 4 to pick a ticket headed by Gov. Thomas E. Dewey as a can- didate for reelection. At present Lt. Gen. Hugh A. Drum, head of the New York State Guard and Maj. Gen. William J. Donovan, former OSS chieftain, top a list of several possibilities for. the senatorial nomination. Drum was an advisers to Dewey in the 1944 presidential campaign. A Dewey bid for the 1948 GOP presidential nomination is expec- ted if the governor wins in No- vember. Mead May Be N. Y. Choice Meeting the same dates in Al- bany, the democrats will pick a ticket which Senator James M. Mead may top as the guberna- torial candidate. With talk of UNRRA Director Fiorcllo La- Guarclia fading, former Gov. Her- bert H. Lehman is being mention- ed most often as the likely senate nominee. If Mead, whose term expires this year, makes the jump into the race for governor, most poli- ticians think it will be with an eye on White House possibilities in 1952. Yugoslav airforce the honor guarc which Gen. Lekic had promisee io furnish when he conferrec yesterday with Stratton. The bodies were carried from the rugged hills by an escort 01 [eight Yugoslav soldiers of the Fourth army to the'point where they could be placed on the wea pons carrier. A wreath presented by the Fourth army and aviators at- tacher to the Fourth army weiv placed on the military hearse along with other flowers. Flan Burial In U. S. Col. Richard Partridge, the American military attache, an- nounced that instructions had been received from Paris to send the remains to the United States for burial. A guard of honor will remain with the bodies at a mortuary in Ljubljana until they are placed aboard the private plane of U. S. Ambassador Richard C. Patter- son for the flight .possibly tomor- row, to Belgrade. A Yugoslav fighter squadron will circle Ljubljana nnd escort the ambassador's plane to the Yugoslav capital. (It was not clear whether the three would be buried in Bel- .i-ade or the United States. A Belgrade dispatch Saturday said they would be buried in the U. S. nililary cemetery on the oul- kirts of the Yugoslav city. How- ever, a Paris dispatch snid that 'J. S. Secretary of State James Byrnes had asked the army to bring the bodies to the United States for interment.) U. S. Col. Chester M. Stratton, assistant U. S. military attache announced Marshal Tito's com- )liance with the American re- quest for highest military hon- The embassy also said that the fourth army would send out new earching parties through the ugged terrain in the vicinity of he crash to seek the two miss- ng Americans. (The U. S. state department, n a statement issued Saturday light, indicated that whether the United States would take Yugo- lavia before the United Nations ecurity council for shooting own two U. S. transport planes epended on "the efforts of the Yugoslav government to right he wrong Although I.rarshal Tito inform- d Patterson that no one para- huted from the flaming C-47 the bodies of only three of the U. S. Accused Of 'Pressure' Moscow Radio Says Display Of Naval Might Move In Anglo-Saxon Power Politics LONDON, Aug. cow radio charged today that the United States was "attempting to put pressure on Yugoslavia" by a display of military might includ- ing the Mediterranean cruise of the aircraft carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt. A commentator said last week's U. S.-Yugoslav incident had been "inflated" by "sensation-mongers and mischief makers" in Britain and. the UT S. "This incident would have gone unnoticed if it had been adjusted through the usual an apology had come from the gov- ernment whose plane had violat- ed the borders of the other gov- he added. "Anyone who has watched at- tentively cannot fail to have not- ed a number of facts showing that Armed Fortress Flies Vienna-Udine UDINE, Italy, Aug. machineguns loaded and uncovered, an American Flying Fortress arrived here from Vienna today with car- go of mail nnd freight the first American plane to fly the normal route from Vienna since the Yugoslavs shot down two transports earlier this month. The pilot of the Fort, Lt. William E. Hutchins of Los Angeles, Calif., said he had orders to fly to Udine nnd back. It was reported here that Flying Fortress would hence- forth miiko Ihe run daily. Hutchins said he flew lit 000 feet "along the prescribed corridor, avoiding Yugoslav territory." The bomber carried a nine man crew, but no passengers. It was understood here Hint passengers will not be allowed on these flights. he U. S. is definitely attempting o put pressure on Yugoslavia by display of her strength and night. In V. S. Prcsn "One of the biggest American ircraft curriers, the Franklin D. loosevclt. has been sent on n fediterninean cruise. The Am- rican press did not spare adjcc- ves or space to describe light of this warship. the ley that he won't attend the con- vention, the first he has missed since 1918, spotlights a division in democratic ranks. Connecticut conventions, the republican on September 9 and 10 and the democratic on Sep- tember 16 and 17, will parade some more .national figures who may play a part in political things to come. Gov. Raymond E. Baldwin seems assured of the pOP sena- torial nomination, .with Rep. Boothe Luce bowing off the stage, Gov. Harold E. Stassen of Minnesota, who is run- ning openly for the next GOP presidential nomination, will be the keynoter. Balclwin-Stasscn Tic-lips Seen The announcement by former occupants have been recov- national chairman James A. Far- Only one of the H. F. been identi- fied definitely. Eye-witnesses have maintained that they saw two persons para- chute from the plane. Some sources, however, said that what tlie eye-witnesses actually saw were two gas tanks jettisoned from the transport. Fine, Cosfs For Reckless Driving Norman Calvin Allen was charged with reckless driving in a case filed by O. O. Campbell, highway patrolman, in the justice court of Percy Armstrong. Some politicians think the Jong After hearing the evidence, ._, _ Armstrong fined Allen and (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) costs. "Another American aircraft arner, four cruisers and seven estroyers were sent to the Med- erranean earlier. "The American-Yugoslav inci- ent offers another open, and ra- icr ugly, demonstration of 1he cience and practice of the pow- r policies which the Angle-Sax- n countries are becoming mbTe nd more inclined to use in their elations with other countries Yugoslavia Lauded Moscow's Pravda yesterday uded Yugoslavia as an allied ountry with "enough nerve to and up to its legal rights" jamst an "unprecedently sharp" ultimatum. A U. S. Navy spokesman said the intinerary of the Mediter- lask force "in all proba- bility" would be revised. He said, however, that he had no information to support rumors that the task force, led by the giant carrier Franklin D. Roose- velt would visit Smyrna, Turkey. Such a visit would bring the U. S. ships near the focal point of a major disagreement between Russia and the western the Dardanelles straits Ronald R. Walker made the proposal to the economic commis- sion for the Balkans after the Italian commission had approved two more paragraphs of the pre- amble of the Italian draft treaty. Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov responded: "Australia has not had her fields, cities and industries devas- tated." Molotov Replies He described Russia as "leni- ent" in asking for from Romania when "billions of dollars of damage lias been done." Molotov pointed out that Russia had increased the time allotted for payment from six to eight years. Russia has asked reparations from Romania. Finland, Hungary and Italy. The United States. Great Britain and France did not include reparations demands of any set figure in the draft trea- ties that the foreign secretaries conference prepared for the peace parley. The Italian commission to date has passed on approximately 1.3 per cent of the entire document. No progress whatever has been made on any of the other four treaties. Farley Debates 25 Word! Nearly three and a half hours were consumed in debate before 18 words of a Netherlands amendment and seven words of an Australian amendment were adopted by the Italian commis- sion and the fourth and fifth par- agraphs of the treaty finally ap- proved. There are more than 000 words in the five treaties. The Netherlands amendment, adopted after revision, had the effect of giving to Italy greater recognition for her part in the war against Germany. As fin- ally approved, it read: "Whereas after the said armis- tice the Italian armed forces, both of the government and of the resistance movement, took an ac- tive part in the war against Ger- many x x x." This part ol the amendment was supported bv Russia, as well as all other bers of the commission except Yugoslavia, which ignored a siig- Kcstion to mnlcc the adoption un- itnimous. Onr Clause Withdrawn The Netherlands agreed to withdraw the following words contained in the original draft of the amendment: "and Italy de- clared war on Germanv as from Oct. 33, 1943, nnd on "Japan as from July 15, 1945, find thereby became n co-belligerent against Germany nnd Jupan. H was decided to withhold ac- tion on part of the Australian amendment until later because it referred to human rights which are dealt with in article 14. "1 suggest wo might wait couple of Asel Ijobler of Yugoslavia said when this part of the amendment came up. One paragraph of thn Italian preamble remains to be acted upon. FLETCHER JOHNSON DIES BR1STOW. Okla., Aug. 28,   M. Johnson, Creek county state representative, died yesterday after an illness of six weeks. Johnson, long active in t h e state democratic party, was state senator from Creek and Payne counties from 1927, to 1931 and was serving his second term as Creek county representative at the time of his death. Funeral services were planned today. Read The News Classified Adf. TH' PESSIMIST Br Blulu. EAGER BEAVER A DUMB BUNNY MAYFIELD, Idaho, per M. Magnussen figures this beaver was eager but not very smart. Magnussen. discovered the beaver building a dam be- tween the steep banks of a small stream. Realizing that the stream soon would be dry, he placed a ladder there so the beaver could climb out. The next day he found the beaver had chewed the ladder apart and stuck the pieces in the darn. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Uncle Lit Bark started in funeral procession yislerday, but had t' drop car wouldn't mcke but forty- five. Whut's become o' Hi' ol' lime newspaper editor who wrote whul hi: thought, even if he did git shol at ever' once in   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication