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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1946 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 25, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Atomic A9. H.r.? A New York company ha. o.k.d f., potent .n a d.vic. d..J9n.d t. .n .torn., to pow.r coaa und.r Airrnjo Nri July raid 8407 Mrmhfr; Anuu Hurran or c'lrcul.icloii THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION Ill Seek to Head Of New Wage, Price Upheava Government Officials Plan 1 Rigorcui Moves to Hold Down Price Increases WASHINGTON. Aug. 2-1.- Tin- O'Vcrniiii-nt today piilrhc-c i-I> us K-iltoied price' control cle fenvrs for ii fight ngumst clinil) ires nnel it Ihreatenc'cl V.M ieo OPA drafted i egtilalions, dps rm "ve'ry It) eiov. n pi ice increases under llu kley.'l'aft amendment lu tin new priee law. I1] iff Buss Paul Porter prom JM.-d Die program yet' of moat price enforcement (n prevent the black market fron nullifying (he rolled-buck mea ceilings which go into effect Sent Labor Threatens New Drmaml.s A demonstration of finnness ol price line is imperative, -inosl officials agree, if angry labor i.s 1'  control over wages in indus- tries whore price ceilings no long- er applv. Robert J. Watt. AFL interna- tional representative and a mem- ber of WSB. declared in a broied- toniKht over- ABC network that "so far as the nation's work- fire concerned, the price t.quecr.e is aggravated hy the gov- ernment's rigid of wage.s, "I'ncier the circumstances, the AKL has become completely dis- illusioned with bureaucratic i-on- tiol of prices and Wutl said. "We look forward anxious- jy 10 the day when such controls can be wiped out entirely." VtTwiio Wouldn't Talk Again to Go Out for Glee Club ADA, OKL UNDERGROUND FMiET SEIZED: IA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, FIVE CENTS THE COPY Yugoslavia Has Given In To Ultimatum But U. S. Wants Righting Of 'Wrong Done' May Yet Take Case Ukraine Files U.N. Complaint Charges Greeks Trying To Provoke War With Neigh- boring Albania NEW YORK, Aug. 24. To Council of U. N. Tifo Letter Says 'Thousands' of Allied Flights Were Deliberate; Patterson Report of Talk with Tito Different By JOHN M. IIIGUTOWIDR WASHINGTON, Aug. government an- Soviet Ukraine tonight filed a nounced tonight that Yugoslavia had bowed to its ultimatum lor ma 1 complaint against Greece Schools Here Start Pre-Class Preparations During This Week JAMESTOWN, N. Y. Aug -When Hichiird ,1. Werner. of Jamestown was wounded :.i iictitm in Khen.s, Germany. March 23. doctors agreed never talk again." but he's Pennine to try out fur the glee c.'ub when he returns to school n'.-xi month. A blast from a German howit- zer left Private Werner with a .'loJc in his throat, severed vocal cords, a fractured larynx and a severed windpipe. After lying in an army hospital its-: more a month, breathing through a silver tube inserted tr-.rough the wound in his throat, Werner heard a dor-tor sav: "We're going to try to" suture chords, fella. Not much chance it will work, but we may fiet_a squawk or two out of you.'" Three months in a hospital in England followed before Werner was flown to Ft. Devens, Mass.. 1" placed under care of a throat specialist m Lovell Gen- eral hospital. First Graders To Enroll Aug. 28-30 Public School Offices Open Daily Now; Other Grades Enroll in September ThinKs begin moving thin week r the Ada public schools, with :hool work scheduled to begin vo weeks hence, on Sept. That thrilling enrollment for the new crop of first graders will ho accomplished this week, on Wednesday, Thursday and Fri- day, AiiKust Parents are reminded to brlntf birth certificate's of these Horace Mann Has East Central Has Junior nnd senior high school enrollments will lake place the first three days o[ the following; week, Sept. 3-5. The schedule of enrollment for first Kraders is: Wednesday, August 28 First Hradcrs whose names start with letters from A to J. Thursday, August 29 First graders whose names start with letters from K to R. Friday, August grad- ers whose names start with let- ters from S lo Z. Knrollment will ho clone from a. m. to 4 p. m. each day. Cirtule school principals will meet in Ihe office of Supt. Rex O. Morrison Monday afternoon, Aug. nt 3 o'clock for pre-en- rollment planning. All offices will be open begin- ning Monday, Aug. 26, and each day for the remainder of the Iwo weeks preceding school, with hours from [I lo 12 and 1 to 4 o'clock. Schedules Ready Enrollment Dates Are Set, Building Getting Annual Painting, Cleanup Plans ore now being completed for the opening of the Horace Mann school. The building is re- ceiving its annual August paint- ing and cleanup. On Thursday, Sept. 5, fresh- man orientation tests will be given to sludonls who plan to en- ter the ninth grade at Horace Mann; these help the .student to plan the program of courses he will follow. Enrollment is scheduled for Friday, September C, for seniors and juniors; freshmen will enroll the following Monday as will stu- K "r dents in the first eight grades accomodated. i r _ i -ii- -r 1 P. I h trt I lory a i n More Equipment Library, Labs, Home Ee Department, Industrial Arts Can Handle Mort Work East Central State College is ready. i The college here is prepared for enrollment expected to be up to pre-war standards or even higher. Additions to the faculty have strengthened many departments There will be many veterans of War II among the students, nnd work-js being hurried on addit- ional housing units that will furnish living quarters for sever- al dozen more than at present with the United Nations securily council, charging that the Greeks were attempting to provoke war with neighboring Albania. Foreign Minister Dmitri Manu- ilsky, contending that the "Irre- sponsible policy" of the Greek government endangered peace and security in the Balkans, call- ed upon the council to act "with- out delay to eliminate this threat to peace." Manuilsky, who released the text of the complaint in Paris also contended that British inter- vention in Greece and the pres- ence of British troops was the principal factor" in upsetting the situation in the Balkans. "Cases are becoming ever more frequent Jn which the Greek arm- ed groups, penetrate into Alban- ian territory with the obvious ob- ject of provoking an armed con- flict with Albania which would serve as a pretext for the wrest- ing of the southern part of Al- bania (northern Peirus) in favor of the complaint said. This was the second time the Greek cose had before the council, Russia having asked last over the shooting down of American transport pianos, but it held open the threat still to throw the whole case into the United Nations Security Council. Whether it does so, an official statement indicated, will depend on the official evidence of the circumstances under, which the planes were shot down plus "the efforts of the Yugoslav government to right the wrong done." The "wrong done" includes the deaths of several if not all the five crew members aboard an un- armed army transport plane shot Only Three Bodies Found Tannery for the U. N. to take the Greek question Another month passed before a doc-tor removed the tube from throat and asked: "How you It'Olmg. "Okay." Werner rasped with- out thinking. And then, with a break and in a fever o" excitement, he croaked "Hoy1 can lip's planning to go to Soutl Lancaster (Mass.) academy nex month to complete his nigh school course. "And what's he declar- ed. "1 m going out for the men's Kk-e club. Hut you know what J used in be a tenor. Now I'm basso ARKANSAS I IS SLAIN BY WIFK LITTLE HOCK. Aug. 2-1 Dr Paul C. Ksrhweiler, pro- lessor at the University of Arkan- ja? nuTlioal school, was shot to d'.-ain at his home- here late- last nigh? n hours later his Civorcod v.ife was formally cnargc-d with murder. Tracy Kxchweiller. 45. was arrpj'.ed at her home shortly bo- fore 2 a. m. today by city detec- tives and Deputy Prosecuting At- torney O'.is Nixon who quoted Ihe woman ar: .saying she fired Ihe .'.ingle shot during an argu- ment o'. cr "another witiiKmY, pic- IWEATHER! Oi-lahfiiiia: I'ai tly cloudy Sun- d.-.y Miinday; .sninewhat TA-.-i.-ir.r-r .Monday east. Kasl and CYntrnl. a Imle warmer in eastern third of state. Slonewall Schools Enroll on Sept. 2 Buses to Moke Runs That Day; Shop and Music Teachers Needed Stonewall schools open Sep- tember 2, with enrollment to be- gin on lhat clay at 0 o'clock, ac- cording to D. D. Duke, super- intendent. Buses will make their regular runs on that cltite. Studenls will nol need to bring their lunches for that day. Class work will begin on Tues- day, September 3. Stonewall schools have pur- chased two new buses this sum- mer. Buildings have been re- paired during the vacation months. Several new teachers have been acquired but two still tire needed, Duke shop teach- er and a music teacher. Dr. Victor H. Hicks, director, is in his office Monday through Fri- day each week and will wel- come Studenls and parents who wish to confer with him about school problems for the coming year. Parents wishing to enter stu- dents in Iho first grade should present birth certificates show- ing Hint the child will bci six years oC uge before Nov. .1. To Finding of Jewels Army Officer Recovered Hoard of Kronberg Castle Jewels in Wisconsin FRANKFURT, Germany, Aug. coda word "ceme- tery" led to the recovery by army investigators of a hoard of' Kron- berg castle crown jewels in a Hudson, "Wis., house, a prosecu- tion witness teal! f loci today at the trial of WAG, Ctipl. Kathleen B" Niish DuraiH, The defense protested the trea- sure had been illegally seized by tho army "without a search war- rant and without permission of the owner of Ihe house." John D. Salb of tho army provost marshal's office in Wash- ington, D. C., produced a note The college is asking towns- pe'opte to help fui'nish quarters for these last until the new units are ready in mid-fall. Enrollment for the college is scheduled for Monday and Tues- day, September 9 anci 10. Football returns to East Cen- tral in full array with Frank Cnder, with years of successful coaching to his credit, heading the grid staff and Pat Wheeler, former East Central backficlct star, assisting. In no previous year has as much, equipment been added to the of dollars worth of books, equipment for the industrial arts department, new equipment throughout for the Home EC department; en- largement of physics and chemis- try laboratories. The district meeting of the Ok lahoma Education comes up in October, with an attractive groir of speakers. ---------------------K-------------- Consciousness Center Found! Mysterious Entity Believed Located Almost in Center Of Skull Cavity BALTIMORE, Aug. The late Dr. Walter E. Dandy up ........__ on the {rounds that the presence o( Britsh troops there constituted interference in the internal af- fairs of the country. In Febru- ary the council agreed to take note of declarations made by all delegates and consider the matter closed. (In London, a high British gov- nf n-ffinijll eraiyl Question Raised Again Whether Three or Five Airmen Died in Yugoslav Crash By GEORGE PALMER BELGRADE, Aug. representative of the Graves Registration commission said to- day Hint U. S. army workers' in- vestigations indicated' that the bodies of only three U. S. fliers had been found in u mass crave in the Yugoslav mountain village of Kropovnik. As army workers searched the grave, the representalive said, Ihe question again was raised as to whether five American air- men, as had been supposed, or Seek Higher Trainee Pay Labor, Vot Organisation] Assail On-Job Pay Ceil- ings as Below Living Wage By ROBERT GKIGKR WASHINGTON, Aug. and veterans' orgiinizu- tions Sfil out today to lift tho new :i month ceilings on pay fur win- veterans in training with government aid. Both I he American veterans of World War II and CIO said thi- new salary top is "less than a living Jack Hardy, national com- down August ID. Yugoslav Mar shal Tito in .1 letter to American Ambassador Richard C. Patler- son on August 23 said that none of the occupants of that piano "has been found so far" appar- ently meaning that he had no ev- ernment official said Ukraine's I on'y three, died in the blazing complaint against Greece "pos- sibly" was designed to shift world attention from Yugoslavia. (This official, referring to Uk- raine's reference to British inter- vention in Greece, said his gov- ernment would "jump at the chance" to defend its policies in the strife-ridden Balkan (In Paris, Greek Prime Minis- ter Conxtanlln Tsaldnrls said "we are vary happy" to have the case go to the council. wreckage ot their U. S. transport plane shot down near Bled, in northwest Yugoslavia, on Aug 19. One Body Identified A Graves Registration squad could identify positively only one body found in the of Capt. H. F. Sclirleber. The in- formant said identification w a s made by a dog tug found on the body. Eyewitnesses to I h e shooting idence of survivors. The pliance" consisted of release of "s the occupants of the first plane downed August 0. PaUcr.suii Keport Differs mander of the American veterans of World War 11, called on all local posts of his organization to back nun in asking the next con- gress to raise the ceiling. Ho ask- ed the posts to arrange confer- ences on the subject with local employers and Veterans Admin- istration officials. Officials of the CIO said they are behind the American vet- erans "and other veterans' organ- In announcing compliance with the ultimatum which expired ai a.m. cst, today,   c: peace-time 45111 Infantry Divi sion, with Iho in fun try company and offering an oppor tunity for many more yoiin en. The invitation to enlist goes Ic :hose with service and those whr ire 18 or over who have not ye lad any army service. Lucas, who served with the 362nd Inf. Hq. Co., 9Jst Division n North Africa and Italy, an- nounces the following allraclivi. pay schedule for the or each drill, First Sergeant Sgt. or Corporal 01 PFC seeking a higher ..joy said the present bill "contains three jokers" This is the bill recently passed I Li_y Uti by congress and signed by president which limits govern-' mcnt subsistence allowances of of veterans who arc in college or are talcing on-thc-job training Government payments now total about a month under th r program. Vulerans may receive up to n month, if single, or if married, in government subsist- ence payments But the amend- lf niakc than a month in salary their subsistence will be reduced cor- respondingly. Thus they get no government pay if their oulsfde exceed if single or if married. Thi> bill was backed by Gon Omar N Bradley, Veterans Ad- ministrator, who said a "scandal" threatened unless n halt Placed on "chiselers" who The company has vacancies for staff sergeants and corporals Lucas says. Jomb scares today to make otal of 15 times this week the uilcling has been hurriedly eva- ualed by Ihe employes. LEWIS VISITS IN MISSOURI INDEPENDENCE, Mo., Aug 24, L. Lewis, United Mine Workers-leader, ot Alexand- ria, Va., visited relatives here to- day while enrpute to visit a cousin, Mrs. John Cochran, in Pittsburg, Kas. i "Inbiliz- dtion board's rejection of a waeo increase Harry Lundeberg, sec- retary of the Sailors Union of Iho Pacific, said today would- "Stripper" wells account for 13 per cent of U. S. oil produc- tion, but Slnnolt-Meaders ac- counts for much fine automobile repair. 8-25-H both tmsl: and west coasU, he add- ed, saying "the possibility is great that they will not go back to their ships after the meeting." Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Kiangsu Fighting Flares Alarmingly NANKrNG, Aug. Fighlmg in northern Kianr.su province above Jakao assumed alarming Chinese press dispatches said today as CrcncraJissimo Chiang Kai-shek and General Marshall met at Ku- ling, the summer capital. Simultaneously with the re- ports of heightened fighting in Kiangsu province, came a call for help from the; nationalist coin- mander at Taiyunn, Shuns! pro- vince capital which has been isei- Jutcd by surging communist for- ces. Explosive Manchuria, aft.or a two-months lull, expected major fighting to break out soon likely at Harbin. AH reports of the inereascel ac- tivity ciri-uliileil, Marshall Heinghl U> salvage a plan to pen-mil estab- lishment ejf an all-party state- council of -10 members. Without the council, it. was believed he-re; thai the Nov. 12 assembly of the; national constitutional body would be meaningless. Major Highways To Get Middle Stripes All of Principal Oklahoma Roads to Have Illuminated Stript Eventually OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug '4 _ 7 f' en- gineer for the state highway de- partment, said today illuminated wor'- down iho nm center of all major highways in Mri'donN11 t0 Work on strips probably will not .start until October. Ter- ry because of constrclion work already scheduled Jerry said illuminated lining was tried with good sults on US highway 06 betw, r-n and Tulsa last vcar and on the same highway caiil of Yu- Kon, The cost was about a mile. Ar commission- 01 of public safely, said the cen- icr lining was recommended be- cause many accidents occur be- cause molorists drive too near the center of the road. Not Essential Dr. Clomenlo Hoblcs, surgeon til the National Biological Insti- tute. Mexico City, reported that experiments indicated lhat the cerebellum, that of the- brain which physical move- nonts, in nol necessary lo life. TH' PESSIMST Ain't it funny how th' fel- lers who have plenty n' money try t.1 impress others how hard up they 're. Th' wife who thinks 'cr husband is it milui (jits whut wants.   

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