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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 23, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 23, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Used to that teacher and kids could skip lightly over the geography's information on isolated lands and lakes but now any one of them is likely to bob up as a vital spot in world NX July Tiild i.'lrruluthm 8407 Mrmbfr: Audit Jlumui of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd J10 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY First Actual Achievement For Paragraph Okayed Conference Adopts Opening of Kalian Treaty Preamble Almost Four Weeks After Conference Opens First Documentary Work Approved PARIS. AUR. 23. t.-iv The- peace conference today accom- plished its first actual work on a draft document. Nearly four weeks ;iftcr the conference- opened it adopted the first para- graph of the preamble of the Italian treaty. This paragraph tin; members of the conference who will he signatories. Only Norway Oinillcd Its option was facilitated by withdrawal of n Yugoslav iiiiirndtiieiit which presumably intended to ask that Albania be included. Tbe pa aj'.raph, 11.1 ae- e placed on the; agenda for the Sept. 11 meeting' of the social council. Just Wants Discussion 'This is not a question for the ecurity he said. "The etter was sent to Mr. Lie so that he matter could be discussed at ength in connection with the 'i-oblem of the reconstruction of cvastated areas." A spokesman for Lie said that e had received no comrnunicu- ion from Yugoslavia concerning a complaint with tho security council. Dr. Stampar snid he knew of no new instructions enroute from his government requesting that the matter be'moved from the eco- nomic and social council to the security council. Reports U. S. Holding Ships The Moscow radio, in a broad- cast heard in London, declared that Yugoslavia had alleged spe- cifically... that refused to relinquish six Yugo- slav passenger ships and other vessels now anchored in the up- per Danube. Quoting a Tass message from Belgrade, the radio said that Dr. Stampar hnd asked that- "the in- correct detention of passenger and other vessels" be put on the agenda "for the next security council meeting on Aug. 3.1." The Moscow radio, quoting a task, message from Belgrade, said: "Dr. Stamper, Yugoslav dele- gate und deputy chairman of the United Nations economic and so- cial council, has sent a letter to the secretary general of the Uni- ted Nations asking for inclusion on the agenda for the next secur- ity council meeting on Aug. 31 of the question of. the incorrect de- tention of passenger ships und other vessels. "The other vessels are IS lugs, 10 tankers, 119 barges, seven pon- toons, one crane and 'four other objects. "These goods were stolen by the Germans and are at present to the American' ultimatum, which promised to save the coun- cil from involvement; in n heated issue that might well have wors- ened relations among the United Nations.. Grave tension between Mos- cow and the western powers was reflected, however, In a state- ment from the Brazilian delegate sternly denouncing Russia and "all her including Yu- goslavia, for using .what he colled nuzi-fnscist tactics. llrazillnn Speaks Sharply The'public statement from Dr. Perdo Leuo Vclloso, who seldom speaks up in council and once prefaced a.brief address with the remark that he is a man of few words, was a redraft of one he had prepared before learning last night how tho Tito regime' had reacted to the American demands. The Brazilian expressed his hope that Premier Marshal Tito would fulfill all the; conditions laid down by Washington, ho added, "the at- titude of the Yugoslav military authorities hus no justification in peace- time between friendly countries. "Unfortunately the Soviet Un- ion and her satellites have adop- ted in words and deeds the same aggressive methods of the one- time nazi-fascist regime. Much Talk in Private "The: incident, aroM--- be- tween Yugoslavia and..the.United States is a regrettable conse- quence of these methods." At the time the statement was released Velloso was aware that the personnel from', the forced- down American plane had been released by the Yugoslavs. Most other delegations reserv- ed comment, but they were re- ported huddling in private con- ference groups along the custom- ary lines, with Russia heading a minority and the United States and Britain leading a majority. Tire Price Boost Immediate Increase Ap- proved of About 2J Per Cent YUGOSLAVIA C.IVEN STKKN WARNING: Sealed at. his desk In the Yugoslavian Embassy in Washington, Ur. Serglje JVlakiedo, em- bassy counselor, rends communications with hi.1! con- cerning the stern warning issued to Yugoslavia by the United States. The U. S. State Department gave Dr. Makiedo for his gov- ernment, a scathing note demanding the release of imprisoned American airmen, held following a forced crash landing near the Austrian (NEA WASHINGTON, Aug, today authorized an im- mediate retail increase on about in the .upper reaches of the Dan- I two and one-half per cent in pri- Doesn't Want Surpluses Anderson would like lo prevent repetition of the potato surplus and tho development of other surpluses next year. The only way to do this, some of his aide's say, is lo develop a system of umiUng price supports to the quantity of specific products needed. These aides add that there (lays, were married uK home plate by the Rev. William Wallace, St. Luke's Methodist church, while the public address system played "Here Comes the Bride." Members of both teams lined the foul lines during the cere- mony and then made an arch of huts ns Boger escorlod his bride lo ,i box seat. Then Bognr don- ned his catcher's paraphernalia and helped the Indians defeat Beaumont 10-5. Kans donated n I most for the couple, the Indian manage- ment gave another n n d numerous other gifts were pre- sented by fans and merchants. Pernocton, a Goniinii-dcve'lop- ed drug, is said to make child- birlh almost some question whether the secre- tary has sufficient legal author- It may be necessary, they for him to ask congress for authority. 'Meanwhile, An- derson has been discussing the problem, with-the major farm or- ganizations. Slate BPW Board Meeting Planned The slate board meeting oC Business nnd Professional Bus- iness Women's clubs will be held in Oklahoma City August 24 and All members, officers and chairmen are urged to attend. Mrs. Ozt'Ua Wriner, president of the Ada club, asks that those planning to attend either program call her for hotel, reservation and arrangements for transportation. utae, in the American zones of Austria and Germany." No! Accidental, Is Yugoslav Comment Official Spokesman Ex- plains Why Turk Officer Being Held By WILLIAM II. KING PARIS, Aug, 23, of- llcial Yugoslav spokesman said.____..... Turkish officor-passen- i ceilings, ces for tires for passenger cars, trucks and "buses. The increase Is-being allowed, Hits agency said, to meet a re- quirement Of the now price con- trol act that dealers .profit mar- gins bu restored lo Ihe level of last Mtirch 31. The tiro increase came an OPA. hurried to meet a dealine for price Increases required by the new statute. Most of these in- creases must be in effect by to- morrow. Burlier in the day, the agency granted, retail price increase's ranging from one to three per cent on several kinds of building materials and otherwise adjusted First All-Night Singing Since War Set for Clarila The third annual All-Night Singing at Clurilu is announced for Saturday night of this week. The first and second occasions were back, in and 1341 and then the war intervened to put a halt to the song program. Lawrejtce Slutte and John E. Grigsby, who are in charge of ar- rangements, said Friday that there may be ns many as persons attending. The singing at 8 o'clock and continues right on through the night, with soloes, qimrlels, assembly singing, a 11 arranged informally. There will be several music: cpmpnnics represented among the singers, with some of the others coming from points in Texas and various places in Oklahoma. The invitation to attend in extended lo all. Sixteen Into Army Since August 19 Recruiters Kept Busy In Past Two Here ger on the U. S. transport shot down Aug. 9 was being held be- cause his "flight over Yugoslavia was not accidental." This coincided with a six-word, dispatch from Belgrade to the French press agency saying that Marshal Tito had decided rto re- ject the United States ultimnlum. While some terms of the ultima- tum already had been met, Secre- tary of State Byrnes said the Yugoslav affair was "a pending matter." He added all official United States comment would comu from Washington. Sava Konsanovic, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United States and a member of. his country's peace delegation here, said in a "As has been announced 24 lours before the American note WHS handed (to.the Yugoslav gov- ernment) the passengers and the members of the IJ. S. transport have been released, with the ex- ception of a Turkish office r, whose flight over the investigation has not accidental." ATOKA, Aug. pe- tition signed by .IMS Atoka county taxpayers asjting Judge Roy Paul to call a grand, jury has been fil- ed in district court here, The petition asked for an in- vestigation into the July primary elections in Atoka county, Japan outranks till other Asi- atic countries in use commer- cial fertilizer. The price boost on tires was al- lowed both on sales by retail dealers and on all sales at retail by wholesale distributors. The'new retail ceiling for the popular size 0.00-16 four-ply passenger car tire is as compared with previously. Liquor 'Breaking' Is Ordered Here Intoxicants Taken From Cowboy Hice in Recent Raid to Be Destroyed An order to 'break and destroy has not Saturday, certain intoxicating liquors' been ordered lo take place later than 6 August 24. The .order was Issued in the court Franklin Bourla'nd, jus- tice'of the peace, Thursday.. Involved are'26 pints of whis- tey, 15 pints of gin and 1 quart! of whiskey. The liquor was seized in n raid several .weeks ago, and was taken lYoni Cowboy (Thurman) Hice. On August 12, Hice pleaded guil- ty to unlawful possession of the liquors- and the court ordered it forfeited. Joe Myers'' and Police Chief Quinton Blake were by the order to dispose of l.he liquor by breaking its containers. I U. S. Army recruiters here, Chester C. Martin and Lewis F. Ballingor, report 16 enlistments here since Monday, Aug. IB. I The enlistees, their homes and their assignments are: Ellis S. 3, Ada, un- assigned; H. T. Lambert, Stone- wall, AAF; U. L. Pennington and Sidney F. Pennington, Pernell, unassigned; .Robert D. Sorrels, Dee Griffith, Jr., of Route 3, Pauls Valley, and Luvi Griffith of Route 1, Paoli, unassigned; Lo- roy Johnson, Soper, AAF; George F. Priest, West Main, Ada, unassigned; Olen J. Slices, Stratford, unassorted; Ag- nes Welly, Coalgato, WAC; David G, Ronrlc and Billy Gene Pipkin, Route 2, Alien, unassigned; Han- dall W. Douglas nnd John R, Gleeson, Allen, unassigned; For- rest Smyers, Route 1, Allen, un- ussigned. Slill Had Parking Tickets, Cost HUNTINGTON, W. Va., Aug, 215, city treasury was to the good today because of a motorist's habit of storing unpaid parking violation tickets in the glove compartment, of his car. Traffic Patrolman Whitton said the man had been parking downtown spot for about a mon- th, but: he could never be found utter his car was lagged. Yesterday Whillen slopped the man to. chut with him and brought up the subject of the tickets. The offender voluntarily showed the tickets he had in the compartment and both went to headquarters where the standard charge o{ apiece was paid. Read The News Classified Ads. Draft (all Eased To Defer Certain Classifications WASHINGTON, Aug. civilifin production iidmin ist.rnl.ion announced loc.lny thu only minimum number of key workers" between the ages of I! and 29 c.'in rjunlify for draft. do ferment in I he transportation anc production industries. Thi! announcement wns madi as word went out from selective. service headquarters local boards to defer homo build- ers, college professors and trans- portation and production execu- tives. CPA said selective servici headquarters -would honor defer- ment certifications in the lattoi fields only if the total is kept small, Headquarters previously hnd said tiiat beginning Sept., 1 end of the July and August. draft hol- iday ordered by it would have lo indiict virluajly all able-bodied men of the 10 to 20- yenr bracket, to keep the armed forces at required strength. The changes, last night's an- mnineemeiil. said, were made on recommendation of .John Steel- man, director of war mobilisa- tion and reconversion. Men in l In: now deferment classes must obtain certificates I'roM the inl.eresl.ed federal iigen- teachers from thu office of education, builders from the' Na- tional Housing Agency, transpor- tation or production executives from the Civilian Production Administration. Burton Grindsfaff To Louisiana Paper Out of Navy, Ada Man To Settle at Eunice Burton Grindslaff left, today for Eunice-, Louisiana, whore he will be associated with a news- paper and will make his home. Mrs. GrinrisUiff and their daugh- ter Janet will join him later. Grindstaff. recently emerged from four years service in the navy, most of his time being spent on the wesl coast. He ar- rived in Ada earlier this week from Bnkersfield. Calif. Mrs. Grindstaff and Janet wore al- ready here, visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. J-iodgcns. Graduate of Ada schools and student at. F.ast Central, Grind- stuff taught for a time, got into news work while learning, at. Hugo. He was for a .short time editor of the Ada News, then was with papers in New York and New Jersey before entering the iflvy, His newspaper experience in- cludt.'K some months with the Opclousiis, La., Times which is now owned ami operated by Rigb.v Owen, former circulation manager of The Ada News. AL'EUS, Aug. annual .Jackson county free fail- will be held here So pi..' 12, Ki and 14. The oven will be held on the Southwest Oklahoma Roundup club grounds. U. S. Embassy Still Silent Tito Orders His Planes Not To on Foreign Over Yugoslavia PARIS, Aug. of- ficial Yugoslav press agency Tan- jug said today that Premier Mar- shal Tito had decided to reject the American ultimatum. The Tiinjug dispatch appeared in four Paris newspapers today, but the U. S. embassy in Bel- grade said over the telephone tonight that the tiispatch had not appeared in Belxrado, tho press has "plnyed down" story of the difficulties between Yugoslavia and the United States, Tho embassy in Belgrade df- clined lo comment on the report pending the receipt of advices fronx Ambassador tlichard C, Patterson, who met with Tito yesterday. "We are wailing for n message from the iinibn.ssndor right a member of the Belgrade em- bassy staff said. By GKOKGE rALMER Aug. Premier Marshal Tito, having complied with angry United Sta- tes' ultimatum demanding the re- lease of seven interned Ameri- cans, has given his air force "the strictest orders" not to fire on foreign planes again, ijvcn if they happen lo fly over Yugoslavia without clearance. Tito also has assured U. S. Am- bassador Hichard C. Patterson that permission would be given American representatives to in-- spect both U. S. C-47 transports shot down by Yugoslav pilots, the second demand in the ultimatum. One plane was downed near Lju- bljana on Aug. 9 and the other near Bled last Mondny. SaUiiliiclioft Promised "The Yugoslav government hms promised to give U. S. embassy officials said after Patterson's two-hour conference at Bled yesterday with Tito con- cerning the ultimatum, which re-. H uired satisfaction within 48 hours with lhc alternative of ar- raigning Yugoslavia before the United Nations. Two American graves registra- tion representatives were sched- uled lo inspect the scene of Mon- day's crash, amid that none of the five crew members survived thu fire and explosion which occurred when the ship was forced down. Seven Americans and two Eu- ropeans aboard the plane forced down Aug. were released from custody an hour before Tito's con- fitrenre with Patterson. They had been held in n Ljubljana hotel for almost two weeks. The other pas- senger, it Turkish en plain, repnrled recovering in n Ljublj- ana hospital from wounds suf- fered by gunfire when the palnc wns downed. Nine Well Treated (The nine released men crossed the Mot-grin line into Veni'zin Giu- lia last night nnd wen; taken at once to U. S. HUth division httnd- quarters in CJoriza, Italy, They were reported in excellent physi- cal condition and snid they hud been well (routed, while in cus- Marshal Tito disclosed his cense fire" orders to his air force- in response to n nolu sent him by two American newspaper cor- representative of he Associated Press nnd one of the New York 'Times. "In thy event of further Amor- enn planes planes flying over Yugoslav territory without clear- Jnce, is the same, procedure to X- adopted as on Aug. 0 and the correspondents asked. said Tito's written reply, 'I have given the strictest orders o the Yugoslav Fourth army commanders not to fire on for- eign planes, civil or military, and thu procedure is not to be re- seated." Thought Deliberate In response lo another ques- Continucd on Page 2, Column 5) TH' PESSIMIST A happy home is th' best remedy, in lh' world fer lh' prevention o' our psychopn- .thic wards. If you ain't a self-starter you have 1' work fur crank.   

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