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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 22, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 22, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             It has been suggested that after having youngsters under foot and about all summer, many mothers will soon be just as enthusiastic about the starting of school as the children are not. July 1'ald Circulation 8407 Mr mbrr: Audit Hurcrtil of ClrcilUUon THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION lOil ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY ULTIMATUM TO YUGOSLAVIA TICKS AWAY Peace Parley Activities Overshadowed New p. S. Note to Yugoslavia Peace Parley Limelight By ROBERT EtNSON PARIS. Aug. S. SfCTtiary of State James K. Byrnes the peace conference1 M-.-sion iilinost us soon as it had this morning to confer v.r.h iidvisurs on the.1 Yujlo- situation. His action finplittsizccl how the United States' blunt 48-hour ul- to Yugoslavia over- snadowed all else among the dip- lomats assembled in Paris to write Kurope's peace treaties. Byrnes close-led himself at liis while Charles K. li.iiilcn, state department advisor en eastern Euiopran affairs, amt Samuel Hcbcr, advisor on .Euro- pean affairs. There appeared little imme- diate prospect that there would be any official comment from Yugoslav peace conference dflf-catum on the ultimatum, v.-hi-h demanded that Yugoslav release American airmen forced down in Yugoslav territory with Paris angles of the tense situa- tion, one Yugoslav source said "the matter is in the hands of Marshal indicating all ac- tion and statements Would come from the head ot the government. There was no indication whe- ther the ultimatum would be ac- cepted or rejected. An unofficial Yugoslav source said he did not believe the American press reaction to the shooting down of the two Ameri- can transport planes would have been so strong if equal publicity had been given to the Yugoslav note of several weeks ago pro- testing again Allied planes mak- ing unauthorized flights over Yugoslav territory. "That note was delivered two weeks before the first plane was shot down." he said. Hcvin Nol Giving Warning: A spokesman for the British delegation denied a report pub- ished in London that Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin expected 48 hours or face action before lo see Eclvard Kardelj, head of security'the Yugoslav delegation and vice-premier, and warn him that British-Yugoslav relations were deteriorating. Bevin "has no appointment to h e United Nations council. Up To Tito Although high Yugoslav dcle- R.v.jon members were busy on see Mr. Kardelj and none is ex- the spokesman said. Other British sources said they were not pleased with Yugoslav- British relations, but they took the view that the ultimatum to Marshal Tito was strictly an American matter. News of the American ultima- M a r s h a' 1 Tito's government to give the United States satisfaction within 48 hours'for'acts described as war- like or face action by the United Nations security council circu- lated quickly among peace con- ference delegates during the early morning hours. Talk Demands On Italy Today Debate on reparations and ter- ritorial demands against Italy by Albania, EgypUand Austria was on today's agenda for the 21-n'a- tipn peace conference. Allied diplomats, however, were con- cerned mainly with the effect of what some observers considered the sharpest blow yet to hopes for early and amicable settle- ments on treaties, coming, as it did, on the heels of stubborn wrangling between the western powers and Soviet Russia and her eastern European adherents. Cost of Coal, Oranges to Go Up, Flour Prices Face Hike OPA Sets Dote for Retail Meat Ceilings to Apply Again, Promises Full Fledged Drive Against Black Markets By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITH WASHINGTON, Aug. Higher coal prices Apply Now to Get Terminal Leave Pay For Enlisted Ranks Men who served in the enlist- ed man's ranks of the armed for- ces can now apply for the term- inal leave pay that was provided by recent action of congress. They can get application blanks .at the postoffice here, from the wen: into effect today and oranges are going up, but a rneatlVFW or American Legion offices price cut is due Sept. 9. Naming the date when retail meat ceilings are "to apply again, OPA Chief Paul Porter also pledged an all-out drive against black markets. As this campaign developed. Allen Guard Unit Ready to Sign Up Men for Company .The National Guard is about to its place in Allen for younger men of that city and Capt. Sherman Jones announ- ces that 1st. Bn. Hq., 180th, is ready to start enlisting men for postwar Guard. Those who are interested arc asked to come in to the Ford gar- a; Allen where someone will be at hand each week day from 5 to S p.m., ready with information ind also to take enlistments. Jones reminds that a young fellow doesn't have to have a ser- vice record to be eligible to en- i.st. However, he must be at least I C0ntrois 1; ]S years of age. He calls attention to the at- tractive pay schedule ranging S2.50 for a private for one drill up to for a first ser- Ceant. to provision for 48 drills curing a year and with the sum- user ramp and its pay in addition. .Jones served with the 45lh Di- during the recent war and unlike most National Guard unit be command- :.-.K officer of his war-service oul- 1st Bn. Hq., 180th. OPA authorized a price boost of 30 cents a ton for hard coal and 'for coke, and an increase of 18 cents a ton for soft coal. These retail price hikes are re- quired by the new price control law, OPA said. Orange Price Up Soon On oranges, maximum prices in retail stores will climb about a half cent a pound as soon as grocers receive supplies at high- er prices authorized for produc- ers. But even while the parade of price increases continued, OPA went ahead with an assignment it rarely handles any more a price cut. Porter reaffirmed at a news or from Gene Ford, Veterans Ad- ministration contact officer here. Service offices 'of organizations and.. ForcB- prepared to assist veterans in get- ting the applications properly filled out. DO NOT PAY, ANYBODY TO HELP FILL OUT AN APPLICA- TION. There is some notarizing to be done and this will be done WITH- OUT CHARGE if an applicant is being aided through any of the individuals mentioned above. Johnson's Death Sentence Stands OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. The state criminal court of appeals has affirmed the death sentence c-onvirtipn of M o s e Johnson, charged in the death of another McAlcster penitentiary convict, and has set his execution ioi- Nov. 1. Johnson was accused of the sibyir.K in of L. C. Smalley, another convict. The rase was related to the of Pat Kiley, sergeant of The prison Guard, for which Stan- ley Stcen was convicted and. .giv- en the death penalty. Steen com- rr.itted suicide before the execu- tion could be carried out. Johnson w a s charged jointly v.v.h Steen in the Riley case, lie had previously been given a life Mntence for his alleged part in :hht flaying. Both Johnson Steen for other offenses. and conference that the new meat ceilings which the price decon- trol board ordered restored will be at or near June 30 fi'gures. In ordering them back, the board said meat prices had climb- ed from 20 to HO percent after 'ipsccl June 30. JKIour Goes Up Porter also announced a price increase ot seven cents a hund- red pounds for flour, effective Friday, to offset higher parity prices for wheat, which remains ceiling-free along with all other major grains. This price hike is expected to raise retail flour ceilings about one cent on a 10-pound sack, on top of a cent a pound increase al- lowed early this month. However, "Porter said that bread prices, raised a cent a loaf Aug. 2, will be cut by the same amount when the agriculture de- partment lifts restrictions on the milling ot wheat, perhaps this fall. Here is the schedule for restor- ation of ceilings on other items ordered back under price con- trol: Fats and and refin- ed tank oils, Aug. 23; consumer products such as salad dressing and mayonaise, at manufacturing levels, Aug. 30; non-manufactur- ing distributors of finished prod- ucts, Sept. 4; retailors, Sept. 9. Grains and Sept. 3; flaxsced, Sept, 3; mixed feeds, Aug. 26; by-product feeds, Sept. 3. Plane Crash Fatal To Enid Pilots ENID, Okla., Aug. 2. (XP) Enid. Okla., flying enthus- sorvins iasls, Patrick Holden, 34, and ___ _ ,_______ Claude Franks, died last night Read The Xews Classified Ads whc'P a. Piloted by Holden, WEATHER Oklahoma Part local Ihundershowors ci.-ntml tonight and Friday; i-kif'.cr north central Fridav. y cloudy, west arid crashed and burned south of Woqclring field. Highway Patrolman Johnny Hayes said the plane, a converted BT-13B, -took of from Woodring field about dusk. Witnesses re-- ported the ohip was about two miles from the field when it nosedived lo earth and-burst into Flames. Head The News Classified Ads. Teacher Shortage Gets New Steps By State Board Aug. broader measures to cope with the most drastic teach- er shortage in state's history are contemplated by the state board of education. State Supt. A. L. Crable said the board will consider further sle.ps to alleviate the scarcity at a frneeting Sept. 13. The superin- tendent recently estimated the state's public schools, will be teachers short when the fall ,term opens. He Has declined to revise the estimate but said that as" the tii.-ie for school opening nears his office is being besieged by more and more pleas for aid in find- ing teachers. First-grade certificate examin- ations will be hel'd by the board in every county seat Friday and Saturday in an effort to get more qualified teachers, but if a great supply does not materialize, the board" may have to relax its teacher requirements further, Crable said. Blast Kills Troy West, Wife and Son Former Francis, Ada Resi- dents Victims of Gas Ex- plosion at Tribbey Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Troy L. West, their month-old son Carey Lynn West, and a 14-year old neighbor girl, Janice Rice, 14, were killed Wednesday afternoon when bu- tane gas was ignited in a home at Tribbey. Three oilier persons were injured. Funeral services will be held Friday at p.m. from Cedar Grove school near Francis, Rev. E. E. Morris officiating; burial will be in Memorial Park for Mr, and Mrs. West and the baby. The Wests formerly lived at Francis and Ada. He was an em- ploye of the Stanolind Pipeline company. Mr. West was 40 and his wife 34. Parents At Francis Mrs. West's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. "Buck" Henson, live in Francis, as does a brother Leonard; Mrs. Naomi Maxwell of Ada is a sister. Mr. and Mrs. West, parents of Troy West, also live in Francis, as do a bro- ther, Orville West, and a sister, Mrs.- Edith Phillips. Other relatives of Mrs. West are a brother Wilbur Henson of Hugo, and sisters, Mrs. Effie Lynn and Mrs. Myrtle Melton of Maud, Mrs. Mildred Lee and Miss Ola Lee Henson, Tulsa. Also sur- viving Troy West are a brother Roy West of Madill and a sister, Mrs. Virgie M. Jones, at Cumber- land. Also injured in the blast were Mrs. William Parker, in a Shaw- nee hospital, her husband'Wil- liam and Kenneth Tate; L. M. McLoud, Stanolind intendent, and Martha JEWS DEPORTED FROM PALESTINE: Some of the 700 Jewish immigrants disembark at Famagusta, Cyprus, after having been deported from Haifa, Palestine. The immigrants had attempted to make a landing at Haifa but were repulsed by British troops. They .were brought to Cyprus on the Royal Navy transport, Empire Radiophoto) a .neighbor.. gijl, were in the house when the ex- -plosion occurred. West Served Overseas Troy West served overseas in the Pacific with Roy White of Ada, including service at Wake Island -and the Philippines with an ordnance unit. Officers reported that gas ac- cumulated 'while a stove was be- Saboteurs Attach Mines Which Blow Hole in Troopship By EDWARD CURTIS JEHUS ALEM, Aug. 22, __ _._. Swimming saboteurs using lim- plant. super- i Pet mines blew a hole eight' feet artha Louise long ancl- three vfeet :witle below ''v' ing installed was Kenneth Tate, 19, set off when lit a cigaret President's Yacht Is Now at Bermuda By ERNEST B. VACCARO HAMILTON, Bermuda, Aug. (iP) President Truman came today to Bermuda, famed holiday spot. The presidential yacht Wil- liamsburg docked about 9 a.m. (est) at the U. S. naval operating base, leased from Great Britain just prior to American entry into World War 2. His visit to this British crown colony is his second on foreign soil since becoming president. The other was his. trip to Pots- clam, Germany last August for I Preliminary .to accepting the "Big Three" conference. "le structures on the state's be- The president's yacht and' the navy ship in-which he was trailed by newsmen, spotted the islands about 6 a.m. The president expects to re- main here at least 36 hours. The primary purpose of the call is to take on fuel, food and water to last for the remainder of the cruise until, the return to lighter to test the connections. The stove had been set up in the other side of the duplex from that occupied by the West family. The officers concluded that gas had accumulated underneath the West side of the house and the brunt' of the explosion was centered there. Mrs. West and the baby were killed instantly in the p. m. blast and Mr. West and Janice Lee died after being brought to the hospital. The baby was decapitated by the explosion and both of West's legs were torn from his body. The Parkers had spent the day moving into the north side of the duplex and the Tate youth, a family friend, was helping. Tate was blown into the yard anc left wrapped around a hydrani but was not seriously hurt. Both shoes were blown from Mrs. Parker's feet. Furniture was hurled a great distance 01 splintered. The ho'use was com- pletely destroyed. House Blown Into. Air An engineer at the Stanolind slant not 'far distant said he leard the blast, looked, saw the louse about 100. feet from the ground. Workmen shut down the plant and rushed over, ex- tinguishing the fire. West was a pumper for the pipeline company. He had mov- ed to the Tribbey camp two months ago with his family af- ter his recent discharge from the army. He was to have gone to work at p. m. Parker, also just out of ser- vice, had lived in Shawnee, had just got employment at the plant as a pumper and was moving there on his day off. Inspect Buildings At Blind School OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. being reconstruct- ed at the Oklahoma school for the blind have been inspected by members- of the state board of the f f bb'ps'Kip Empir e' 'Elval'ln Haifa Bay shortly before midnight last night, but failed to sink her the government announced today. The announcement came .only a short time after British troops moved into the all Jewish city of Tel Aviv and -four other towns Leonard Must Face Trial for Death In Auto Accident Robert Leonard, at the conclu- sion of preliminary hearing Thursday morning on charges of first degree manslaughter, was ordered held for district court trial. 'Frank 'Bburlandr "the vbond at Leonard is accused of being the driver of an automobile which investigating officers said had as one passenger when it was wrecked near Ada Mrs. Nadine Horn, who died of injuries re- in Palestine in the wake of in the crash. Jewish underground threats of Washington Labor Day, Sept 2. It's hard to be crooked and keep a straight face. Better results for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. the structures on the state's be- half. The buildings, located at Mus- kogee, were demolished in a-tor- nado in April, 1Q45. Board Secretary H. A. Hewett. says the board plans have enough structures' rebuilt to per- mit the school to reopen in Sep- tember. It was clo'sed during last year because the buildings could not be completed. State Supt. A. L. Crable said about 120 blind children of the state are awaiting the reopen- ing. The last .legislature appro- priated for the recon- struction work. violence, "Three swimmers were observ- ed around the stern of the ship and the military guard aboard opened fire on them, though ap- parently without the an- nouncement said, in describing the attempt to sink the Empire Rival, which had just returned from transporting a second load of illegal Jewish refugees to Cy- prus. After an investigation by div- ers the vessel moved into shallow-water under her own power. No immigrants were aboard at the time and rio'casual- ties were reported among crew members. Military and police sources ex- pressed belief that the attack was staged by Hagana's Palmach, the striking force of that Jewish underground organization, and advanced theory that it had been carried put "as a gesture to show the military it could be done. Meanwhile, the military con- ducted a spot identity check in several quarters of Jerusalem shortly before noon today, throw- ing up roadblocks of barbed wire manned by Bren gun carriers. Traffic was jammed on several The wreck occurred north of the city a short distance when the car, out of control, left the highway and smashed into an oil field truck standing in a fill- ing station. A sister of Mrs. Horn was also injured and for a time was in critical condition. Another jn the car suffered extensive injuries to his head and face but is recover- ing. streets while identities and. soldiers searched checked cars. Woodruff Fined For Traffic Violation Charges Grow Our of Fatal Accident Near Stratford Kenneth Lindsay, was tried in justice courjt of Per- cy Armstrong Thursday on a charge of violation of the rules oC the road growing out of an acci- dent last week in which Mrs. Plez Severs, of Route 2, Stratford was Tatally injured. He was fined on that charge and .another on a charge of driving without a drivers license. Woodruff is a'civil service em- ploye who has been employed in Washington, D. C., and with sev- eral companions was on the way to the Ada Rodeo when the pick- up truck he rough place swerved. It crashed head on into a car driven- by Mr. Severs. Mrs. Be- yers was the' only seriously in- jured person; she died two days later at a local hospital. Rehearing Ased On Initiative Ruling State C. of C. Official De- lays Preparation for No- vember Vote on Measures OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. 22, W> Request for a rehearing of the supreme court's ruling on the sufficiency of the initiative peti- tions has again delayed prepara- tions for the placing of four pro- posed constitutional amendments on the November general elec- tion ballot. The rehearing petition was fil- was driving hit a in the road and Blowout Causes Death LAWTON, Okla., Aug. Neva Fort, 24, died yes- terday of injuries suffered when thrown from the cab of a mov- ing truck whsn a tire blew out, causing the vehicle to lurch. whose protest againsl .the sufficiency of the petitions sponsored by the Oklahoma edu- cation association led to the court test. Ashton attacked the initiative petitions on grounds they did no! bear enough valid signatures to make legal the submitting of the questions to the voters. The proposed amendments would provide for free textbooks, require the legislature to appro- priate a annual com- mon school fund amounting to a student, authorize school districts to vote a 15-mill Jevy in stead of the present JO, and auth- orize counties to levy an addition al one mill for separate schools.. British Also Say No lo Russians LONDON, Aug. 22, British foreign office said' today it handed the Soviet representa- tive late yesterday a rejection of Russian proposals for a share with Turkey in the future defense and control of the Dardanelles. The United States, France and Turkey received copies, contents of the .note will not be published immediately. A spokesman said the United Kingdom supported the United States proposal for an interna- tional conference of signers of the Montreux convention controlling the Black Sea entrance. He said the British, view was. that the United States should replace Better results for amount in- I Japan, a Montreux signer, at such vested. Ada News Want Ads. I a conference. U.S. in Angry Note Demands Freeing Of Imprisoned Airmen U. S. Fighter May Accompany at They Fly Over Austria; Not Convinced Attacked Over Yugoslavia By ALEX SINGLETON .WASHINGTON, Aug. United States is considering fighter plane protection for American transport planes which to pass near the Yugoslav b o r d e r while flying the Austrian-Italian route, top diplomatic au- thorities reported today. The plan under consideration would retain the present absolute ban against any American flights over Yugoslav ter- ritory and would be designed to protect American aircraft from attack by Yugoslav fighter planes which might venture over Austria. The whole consideration is based on a point made in the ul- Ex-GI Says P-51's Used American Describes Seeing Fighter Planes Shoot Down Transport Plane By JOHN P. McNIGHT TRIESTE, Aug. American who saw the U. S. army transport shot down nt the Yugoslavia frontier Monday said today, the Yugoslav fighter planes appeared .to be of American manufacture. Yugoslavia received of war supplies, including planes, under the lend lease program during the war. The eyewitness, a former sol- dier with combat experience in .Italy., Jus name, not be used, said the sound of the planes' motors and their lines convinced him that they were American P-51 Mustangs. The American said he witness- ed the incident from a hotel win- dow in bed after he was attracted by the noice of the fighter planes passing overhead. He added that he himself heard no sound of shooting, but that other witnesses in the street told him later they heard four or five loud explosions resembling can- non fire. Burning On Way Down "It was he said, "that the transport plane was hit in the air and was burning on the way down. He added that he saw no para- chutes, but that others told him later two persons parachuted from the stricken plane. He said the two planes, far ex- ceeding the slow transport in speed and maneuverability, gave chase to the transport over Bled as it was proceeding northward, apparently returning to Austria. "They overtook the transport plane over the mountain across the Jake from Bled and made several passes at he said. "The plane then 'went into a slow turn, as though it were about to return to Bled to Innd Then the fighter planes dived again, and the plane fell off into a spin and spiraled to the ground with great clouds of black smoke coming out of it. Many Cheered Fighter Plane "After it crashed on the far side of the mountain, one of the timatum sent to the Yugoslav government late yesterday in which the United States said that Airmen Free LJJUBLJANA, Yugoslavia, AUK. 22, authori- ties today released Americans who had been taken in custody after Uisir C-47 army transport plane forced down here Aug. S. The crewmen, with the ex- ception of the pilot, declared following their release that their airplane was not fired up- on after it was on the ground. The statement was corroborated by (he passengers. The crew members also said they understood that frequent flights by both American British airplanes had been made over Yugoslav territory recently, as ntiny as 20 a day. The release of the fliers after the United States had is- sued -a 48-hour' manding they fee released and allowed to leave Yugoslavia safely. U. S. Ambassador Richard C. Patterson flew to Bled today to confer with Premier Mar- shal Tito. lake and zoomed over the city as though in a victory gesture. "Many persons in the streets cheered as the fighter passed over he said. (A dispatch from Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital, said the best information available there was that no British, or American types of fighter planes were being used at present by the Yugoslavs. Rus- sian-type Stormoviks which are being used look something like British Spitfires, the dispatch said. Immedicately after the war Yugoslavia had a small number of British Hurricane .fighters, and still uses numerous American- made C-47 and German Junkers 52 transports for transport pur- poses.) TULSA JUDGE TO APPEAL HIS FINE FOR SPEEDING the two airplanes already attack- ed by Yugoslav fighters niay not have been over Yugoslavia at all. The American note, demand- ing release of any of the 15 per- sons in the two planes who are still declared that for the time being the United States makes "no statement as to the exact location of the two planes when they were attacked." May File Complaint In U. N, Undersecretary of State Ache- son today called in Ambassador Herschel Johnson for a confer- ence, presumably to discuss ths possibilities of filing an Ameri- can complaint againsl Yugosla- via in the U. N. security council if the Yugoslavs do not comply with the 48-hour ultimatum. The exact time the ultimatum period ends has not been official- ly determined. The question is whether the time begins to run from the hour at which Yugoslav foreign office received the text from its Washington embassy or when the American embassy in Belgrade received it. State department officials told reporters there probably would be some determination of the time elements later in the day. Attackers Not Lend-Lease Planes Considerable interest was man- ifested by officials here m re- ports that American-made fight- er planes reaching through Jend-lease chnnnels may have been involved in the shoot- ing down of American transport planes on Aug. 9 and Aug. 19. However, a stale department in- formant said the only planes lend-Jcased to Yugoslavia were three trainer and one small cargo craft. If any American-made planes are now in Yugoslav pos- session, some diplomats suggest- ed, they may have got there by TULSA, Okla., Common pleas Aug. 22, Judge Carter Smith has announced he will ap- peal a municipal court traffic fine levied after he was charged with speeding. Municipal Judge .T. A. Denny set Smith's fine at and costs. Smith's attorney, Hess Crossland, told' the court the judge was "one of the slowest men in Tulsa" and the judge took the stand to deny he was speeding. He told the court he could "estimate his speed by looking out the win- dow." Officer John B. Baker arrest- ed Smith Tuesday on a charge of driving -J5 miles an hour in a 30- milo-an-hour zone. Better results for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) TH' .PESSIMIST IIT Hub Jr. best policy fer adoles- cents in love is f think twice before they not leap. Next t' a mule, thcrr' ain't nothing' that can be as down- right contrary as a fold in' lawn chair.   

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