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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 21, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Don't soy "spineless os o jellyfish" fo one returned still treating damages inflicted days ago by some of them and opines they can take care of themselves without spines July raid HUrulMlon 8407 Munhrr: Aurtll llurrau nt ClirulMlon PHE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION J08 Two Highway Patrolmen To Other Posts Reviiion of Aiiignmenti Stndi Killian'to Broken Bow, Hawkins to Coalgate CITY, AUK. new detachments of ihc Oklahoma highway patrol being organized and five others discontinued during the war aro b e i n K reestablished, State Safety Commissioner J. M, Gentry announceel toclnv. New units at Broken Bow jind Pawnee, and restored detach- ments nt Duncan. Hobnrl, Alva, T.-ihlcquah. and Knllisaw will nb- MII b part of 43 cadet patrolmen, Gentry said. Strr'nirihrn Tulsa. O. C. Units In addition, Tulsa's six-man detachment will be strengthened by Uie Assignment of five cadets. Six others are to be added to the Oklahoma City headquarters troop. Cadet assignments and tnms- fei s of other officers include: Charles W. Burks. Irnnsferree Muskogec, Bill Hhnc- kloford. transferred from Bar- tlesville. as senior officers of tin new Tahlequah detachment. TWO LEAVE ADA Trooper Cy Killian has been :n Ada five years. He and Mrs. Killian and their daughter will move to Broken Bow as soon Rf they find n place to live. Trooper Harvey Hawkins came to Ada in April of He and Mrs. Hawkins have added it I'.iby daughter lo the family while making their home in this city. They tu Coalgnte. Cadets Weldon A. Wood, Pond Creek; Roy'T. Jackson, Midwest City and Jimmy K. Ury, Sulphur, and Elva A. Cummins, Oklahoma City, assigned to Tulsa. Recruit Paul C. Scott, Elk City, assigned to Muskogee. Cadets Benny Lee Klutts, Oke- mah. assigned to Pryor; Penelton vv. Phillips, Anndarko, to IJar- .llesville, and H. Oklahoma City, to Clnremore dis- trict headquarters. Kermit O. Rayburn. transfer- ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1946 KIVK CKNTS THE COPY rrd from OklahoirrjP City head- quarters troop, as a senior officer fit Sallisaw: and Cadet Vcrnon o Poncn assigned to Salhsaw. Trooprr Cy Killlnn transferred from to form part of a new drUchmenl at Broken Bow. Cadet Shirley M. Murphy, Muskogee. to Hugo. Cadet Franklin E. Richardson, Tulsa. to Durnnt. Cadet Kcnn.'tl) F. Will, Knid ViiKnrd td Ada. Trooptr llarvr.v II :i w k I n traiixfrrrrd from Ada lo L'onlgntr district Cadet Arthur M. Hamilton, J.awUm, assigned lo Conljjnto dis- trict headquarters. Cadet Ted Payne, former radio Tito Shouts Yugoslavia Wants Peace, But Not at 'Any Price' Relations Between U.S., Yugoslavia New Low Level at McAlesler district assigned to Dun- Glenn H Pnrr Cllnlni and W.lliam F Southern. Perry, assigned lo Lnwton d'islric headquarters. Sgt. O. M. Kizziar transfcrrc to Chic-kasha. Cadet Charles O. Dawscm Mus hogpp. assigned to Cadet Houston K. Summers Slillvi-iiter. assigned tn El Reno Cadet Clarence Mcece, Fred former dispatcher at Law ton headquarters, assigned t Chnton. Hy ALEX SINGLETON WASHINGTON, Aug. between tin; United Slates and countries within the Soviet orbit plummeted lo their 'owes! point since war's end to- lay. There were two main rea- sons: 1. An explosive dispute over .he future of the Dardanelles. 2. An angry protest to Yugo- ilavia over Ihc "outrageous pcr- 'ormnncc" of Yugoslav fighter craft which attacked and forced an American transport plane to crash land. Premier Marshal Tito retorted that his country wants PI-HIT "but not at nny price.1." Diplomats hero a n x I n u n I y awaited official Russian lo this country's stand on the Dardanelles stand officials said would firmly reject Soviet demands for a .share in the mil- itary control of Ihe strategic straits. Defends Shooting Down of U. S. Plane; Ambassador Patterson Says Year and Half Ago Yugoslavs Welcomed Our Planes By GEORGE PALMER BELGRADE, Aug. Tito, in a speech published today, stoutly defended Yugoslavia's course in which two American planes have been brought down in ten days, declared the country intends to insist upon its sover- eignty and.shouted that'Yugoslavia wanted peace "but not peace at any price." Cadet Ralph G. Howard, Tulsa sssigned to Guymon. Trooper Jim Stallings transfer rod from Barllesville to be a senior officer at Pawnee. Other cadet assignments are El wood B. Lee. Catoosa. to Knii district headquarters; Clifford C Carrier. Chickasha, to Woodward Wiliiam K. Blood. Ponca City, ic Oklahoma C i t y headciuarterN t.-oop: ,-md William K. Maybcrry to Guthrie. President on Way Now to Bermuda Br EARNEST V. VACCAKO WITH PRESIDENT TRUMAN EN ROUTE TO BERMUDA, Aug. Truman, arm- ed with a full report on the tense Yugoslavian situation, sailed into warmer southern waters today on reverse direction vacation cr'uise. The chief executive's radio- U'U-phonc fill in on incidents in- volving Amcrii-aji army planes over Yugoslav'territory c-Hme from Srcrotarv of Stale Byim-s, who is in Paris for the conference. Presidential Press Secretary Charles G. Ross told accompany- :ni; newsmen of the call shortly after he had advised them tha'l Ihe White House yacht Willinms- buig was headed for a berth in Bermuda tomorrow afternoon. Re-ad The News Classified Ads. WEATHER-Fair tonight and Thursday: somewhat warmer to- night extreme west except Pair handle-; warm Thursday. Top Admirals Going- Over Kven as tho .strain on relations from Trieste lo the the navy announced thai two of its top ranking ad- mirals had left for Europe on n "routine inspection tour" lhat will include! Mediterranean areas. They are Adm. Marc A, Mit- scher. ncling commander of the Atlantic fleet, and Vice Adm. I'orn.-st P, Sherman, deputy chief of naval operations. The navy's "routine" descrip- after London reports had said tho two were enroule to visit "troubled areas." Whatever the purpose of their mission, the fact is thnt ap- proaching Mediterranean maneu- vers can servo to demonstrate United States naval might on hand to back up American dip- lomatic declarations. Talk Grows Toutflirr Those declarations themselves appeared to be taking on a clof- inilely tougher tone, reflecting the altitude in some Washington quartern that 'the time has come for the United Stales to mark n me beyond which, it will not go n compromising establish eel principles. Thnt lone dominated the acid arolcst which the government edged yesterday against the ac- tion of in A me l nnd forcing il to crash Inndln i cornfield. Uneler Secretary of State Dean Acheson used the term "oul- performance" in making niblic the note, which also re- erred to reports from Trieste nut a second American plane is Hissing after having reported tsoIf uiulor machine gun attack. IMP document conlnined a tu fly put "demand" for ussur- ncc lhat UKM-C will be no renu- ilion. Marshal Tilo, in a statement imnelcnst to Yugoslav workers >ver the Belgrade radio last ughl ii-tadu no reference to thp Hissing but el i s p u t e ii 'Une'i-ic'an contentions that tho craft hael been force-it off Is ceiursu by bad weather. Grand River Dam Project Soon Back Into State Hands Federal Government Has Controlled It Since Be- ginning of World War II WASHINGTON, Aug. Grand river dam hydroelectric project, govern- ment-operated since the begin- ning of World War II, is due to be returned to the state on Aug- ust 31, the interior department said today. AeUinl transfer of the dcvelop- nent to the state-authorized River dam authority by that dale, however, depends upon completion necessary "paper- department officials said. ReproKentalives of tho depart- ment's division nnd the fedcrnl works agency nre to leave here today tor Tulsa to help expedite the work. Details of issuing new securi- ties have to be worked out, it was explained. The late President Roosevelt ordered the interior department to seize the project and operate it nt a time, when additional- pow- er was needed for operation of wartime plants In the southwest. Die government then con- tinued tu improve the plant sys- tem. About a year ngo negotiations began lor return of tho project to nl.nte control. Government of- ficials and the GR.DA agreed that outstanding Jour per cent bonds should lie cancelled and new bonds with interest of only 2 per cent should be issued. The new will include not bonds hold by govern- Thn NO H M A N. Aug liMfj.'IY edition of l.he Univi'rnllv Oklahoma's HOO-pnge; Soone'r yearbook will reriulrc a railroad cur lor movemeiH, according to Cecil if. I3rile, general manager of .student publications. Br'ite said the overall weight of the book, lo be 100 pages 'larger than last year's publication, will be a- bout eight pounds. Roael The News Classified Ads. for what it spent in com- pleting the project. Congress passed legislation late in the last session allowing nec- essary _ con tracts to be made and nulhomjrig the secretary of the interior to transfer the hydro- electric plant back to Hie G'RDA. Vienna-Udine Air Flights Suspended BERLIN, Aug. 21, Joseph .1. McNnrncy announced today Hint American air transport ighls between Vienna n n d Ucline had been cancelled until lurllior notice as a result of the downing of two of the planes by Yugoslav fighters. McNarney said he planned to confer with Gen. W. D. Morgan, allied cominnndcii'-in-cliief in the Mediterranean, on measures to protect the planes. He stressed Ilia tsuspension of the flights was "temporary" and Saying he had witnessed the downing of one of the unarmed American transport planes, Tito denied the craft was lost in the clouds or was fired upon after it landed. He admitted, however, tha'ti.aji'.American, plane had been forced; to land. Previous eye- witnesses and official American accounts said, the first plant! strayed over Yugoslav tcrri'tory from Us course on n flight--fromi Vienna, Austria, to Udine, Italyl Aug. and wns1 forced to liind aflcr Yugoslav fighter planes wounded one of the passengers. Ministrr Admits Attack Although Tito mentioned wit- nessing only one incident and did not mention the date, he was be- lieved to have seen both. The second involved u C-47 broughl down Aug. 19 near Bled. Tito was in Bled on Aug. The Yugoslav foreign ministry in a noletacknowledged last night that Yugoslav fighter planes at- tacked the transport and sent it crashing, probably with some fat- al casualties. U. S. Ambassador Richard C, Patterson will.-'take up the matter with Tito personally at n con- ference tomorrow at the Mar- shal's summer palace in Bled. Yugoslavia granted clearance for Ihe embassy's C-47 to fly to Bled. Patterson's party wil include U.S. military attache, Col. Richard Partridge. The embassy is pressing the Yugoslav foreign office for per- mission to send n graves registra- tion representative to the scene nf the .second incident to search for bodies in the wreckage. YugiMliivfl Told Llltle It also is seeking information concerning the two crew mem- bers who parachuted from the blazing air liner nnd for release of seyert Americans involved in Ihe first incident, who arc now in the 13th day o.f their intern- ment at a Ljubljana hotel. There has been no information in the Yugoslav press concern- Albanian In Demand For 'Equal' Seat Insiiti on Place at Peace Conference, Sayi Will Nev- er Allow Frontier Changes By ROBERT C. WILSON PARIS, Aug. 21. prime minister of Albanin, Envoi- lloxhn, demanded today that the peace conference seat him as an equal and asserted that.the Bal- kan state never would .consent to any changes in its borders "for those frontiers are sacred." Many of. his remarks were di- rected against Greece and its prime minister C'onstnnline Tsnl- daris, also a target of Soviet Rus- sia. Referring to Tsaldaris's men- tion of the Albanian quisling gov- ernment during the Italian occu- pation, he asserted that all who remained had been killed and 'those war criminals who fled are in the best hotels In Rome." Wants Friendship With Greeks He asked whether Tsaldaris would consider France an aggres- sor because Hitler hnd expected to wage aggression from French territory. It was from Albania, which Italy had seized as a pre- lude to the last war, that Mus- solini attacked Greece. Hoxha asserted that Albania would like to be friendly with the Greek people "but the Greek people have no influence in their government." He demanded thnt the peace treaty "put nn end to the aggres- sive, imperialistic policy of Italy." Wants Hoxhu asserted that Italy caused gold francs damage in Albania and demand- ed "as right, to be al- lowed to determine the amount and payment ot Italian repara- tions." Hoxha received n long burst of applause and so did Alfonso R. W. spokesman for who spoke next. The Mexican ambassador to Paris expressed his country's hope thnt "n just and equitable oeace will be concluded" with Italy thnt "will permit her to join with dignity in the concert 61! nations." Speaking of the defeated en- emy nations, the Mexican spokes- man said: "Mexico simply hopes to pre- vent the damages caused by a war imposed on her, from falling on the Mexican people." He in- dicated Mexico would ask com- pensjUion for "direct damages." i fc___________ Amount of Soldier Vote Is in Doubt Not Enough Came in After July 23 Election to Change Any Remits U. S. Note Firmly Says No To Russian Control Of Straits Ceiling Prices Bock Soon On Meat, Not on Dairy Products If Their Prices Hold Steady By MARVIN L. SIMITII WASHINGTON, Aug. -Price ceilings on mcnl, ordered re-established by the decontrol board, probably will go into ef- fect at retail stores a'boul Sepl. 3, an OPA official said today. This tentative arrangement, subject lo approval by the agri- culture will put back retail ceilings on meals J2 days later than OPA previously had shinned. While directing restoration of and wholesale ceilings following a fuw days lati.'r. An OPA official snid this pro- cedure would "give the industry ii chnnci; to clean out meat sup- plies acquired at higher prices during the period of no control." The docontrol board's restora- tion of meat price ceilings brought varying reaction. Industry, CIO Dissatisfied The meat industry spoke of II 1 i I I 1_ LI J I L.J 1 J K IUni.UJlll.ll.lll 111 I jl I I i It ceilings on meat, the price docon- TO! board decreed that milk, but- .r l" ami lor, cheese, and all other dairy products should remain free of controls. OPA and agriculture dcpart- officials expect to set up by lighlfall a definite schedule for Ihe meat ceilings. Previously, OPA had announced controls would be rcinvokcd at a.m. Friday. Start With Live Animals Revised plans call for recstab- lishment of controls Friday on ilic would find ILSS meat lo buy. And the CIO cost of living com- mittee said 1he decision to keep dairy products free of controls "will bring greater inflation to the American people." On other points in ils first de- cision, the- congressional ly cre- ated decontrol board: 1. Ruled against restoring coil- ings on nearly nil .grains. 2. Authorized livestock and meat .subsidies lo be paid again, live animals only, with packer I (Continued on Page 2, Column 5) Chinese Communists Setting Up Own Government of Manchuria OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. strength of the soldier vote in the state's July 23 runoff primary still was in eioubt today as the deadline passed for the acceptance of war ballots. State Election Board Secretary J. William Cordell nniel no re- turns wereTeceived from county election boards yesterday when they were due to certify war bal- lot totals to the board Cor inclu- sion in the final official count. The war ballot law gave serv- ice personnel an additional four weeks for voting in the runoff, but since war ballots received through election day were count- ed in the tentative official tabula- Lion, it was not txpectecl enough ballots would arrive late lo af- fect the outcome of .any races. The protest period in county ends at noon tomorrow and n state races at noon Saturday, when Cordell said certificates of nomination probably can be is- sued. ing these incidents except publi- cation of Tito's original protest note Aug. 11 and today's account ol Ihe marshal's speech.'Reaction Jn the Yugoslav capital was neg- ligible. Tilo spoke before iron factory workers yesterday at Jesenice near Bled. He charged Ijint al- most, every day brought "inces- sant new violations of our fron- tiers and territory." "You know, 1 he said 'that almost every day not only civilian but military planes flow over our territory, not single planes nlonc, but even whole: squadrons." "Imperialists' The premier charged that even while peace negotiations were on, "we have come to rea- lise that certain countries which during the war of liberation narched together with us do not >visli a pence of .liberation but mi inperlnlistic peace." He snid the sacrifices of Run- lin, Yugoslavia, Poland and oth- er countries "nnd their tremen- dous contribution' toward victory n having carried the main bur- den of the war" appeared now said: "We know t be He declared that Yugoslavia soon as ho could work out M 6, ea tflat of operation with allied I would stnve to "chieye pence. Italy. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Crude Oil Subsidy On Strippers Slays WASHINGTON, 'Aug. federal subsidy on crude oil produced' from stripper wells will be continued even though it was not mentioned in the price decontrol board's decisions last night. The new price control act makes special provision for pet- roleum, subsidies, declaring thnt despite the absence of oil price in ceilings the payments shall be tTKHl, continued "at not to exceed the McNarney Irked By LaGuardia Charges Of Opposing UNRRA Assarts U. S. Army in Ger- many Has Been Acting In Good. Faith and Integrity By EDWIN SIIANKK BERLIN, Aug. 21. Joseph T. McNarney accused UNRRA Director General Fiorcl- lo LaGuardia today of making "completely baseless" allegations that American occupation forces had deliberately opposed humani- tarian and repatriation aims of UNRRA. LaGuardia left here today for Warsaw to continue his inspec- tion tour of U-NRRA's European activities. In mi unpi'ccL'donledly blunt] statement, the usually reticent McNarney categorically denied u charge which lie attributed to LnGuardiii that the army was op- posing UNRRA's aims. The statement by the comman- der of U. S. forces in Europe :ame as a complete surprise, since tie and LaGuardia had dinner to- gether last night just after the UNRRA director had said at a news conference that "from now on" he expected hand in glove with and British armies. McNnrney's statement, which was onn of the leingc-st he: has is- sued since assuming his post in Germany, also disclosed Hint one Russian secret agent had been known to operate "under the cloak of UNRRA." Commenting on published re- ports, attributed to an unidentifi- ed British general, that UNRRA was being used as an umbrella covering widespread activity ot: Deny Declaring War OH Chiang's Troops, Say Will Talk Peace When Fighting Stops By HAROLD K. MILKS NANKIN G, Aug. China's communists announced today establishment of their own government of Manchuria, and said they would not discuss par- ticipating in any coalition gov- ernment of China iml.il nil of the eiirri-nt righting is .slopped. Some infririned (juarlerii here said Hint coal ili on establishment of such n had become "the last of mediators seeking n per- manent peace. "Slop KJRlitinK" First Communist spokesmen denied that their parly was calling for all-out, mobilisation against Chiang Kai-Shek's forces, and snid they "have no desire" to overthrow his national govern- No Appeasement For Russia in Demands Over Dardanelles American View It Dual Control Means Domi- nation or Occupation Of Turkey Hy JOHN M. HIGHTOWER WASHINGTON. Aug. 21. Tin- United State's launched .1 carefully planned diplomatic of- fensive today against Russian ex- pansion into fresh areas of middle east and Asia. The master stroke was deliver- ed with public announcement of this government's rejection of Soviet demands on the Dardanel- les. The broad outline of the form the rejection would take ha-l been known in advance, so thes significance was in the readiness of top American officials to de- clare flatly, if privately: Turning Hack There will be no turning hnc'x. from this rejection--no "Munich- like" settlement with Ihe Soviet Union over the strnlegic middle- eastern waterway. President Truman. Secretary of State Byrnes, Undersecretary Acheson, Secretary of War Pat- terson and Secretary of the Navy Forresla) all have reviewed the American policy this basis. And they are reported to have agreed that it must stand absol- utely firm unless the United States is willing to grant Hussia new slash of domination from the Dardanelles to India and China. Concurrent with the release of the text of the note, which is it- self diplomatically mild but firm, n high diplomatic official said that if the Russians insist on hav- ing bases in the Dardanelles to the point of trying to use force will mean very grave trouble in the world." U. S. Has Been Concerned This possibility was fully re- viewed by President Truman and his stale, war and navy chiefs nt n Whiles House meeting ln.it week. Tin; diplomatic official gave this account of the wny Ameri- can policy on the Dardanelles had taken shape: Tho United States has opposerl where it generally had to be content, with watching with extension of Russian communist domination over eastern Europe. The present difficulties with Poland, YURO- which is strictly a one- slnvin and other Soviet dominat- parly regime now. But they add-I cd nations nre regarded here "The first thing lo stop fight- ing. Then we can talk about re- organizing tin: government." Some observers here snid that General Marshall and Ambassa- dor John Loightun Sliinrt, having failed to slop the .shooting first and talk politics later, now were trying lo reach a political accord Russian secret agents, McNarney part of the general pattern of the struggle between HIP Soviet Un- ion nnd the western powers re- sulting from what American of- ficials regard as Soviet aggres- siveness. With regard to.Turkey, Russia has a legitimate interest in the interest first recognized in a 1774 treaty with the Ottoman empire which gave the Russians certain rights in the strategic waterway. Ever since, the Russians have --------......_ sought periodically to increase would demand in any coalition i their Dardanelles privileges. Thus government. their latest, move to gain somft first. Chiang- In Placating Move Chiang, these sources said, had UNRRA to Marshall to request a list ith the American of ministries which MriiiHiuri.Ys new Ked .idminis- tralion, the communists' official radici nl Yi'iian announrcd, is "Ihc: provisional supreme.' adminislrn- lion for democratic composed of elected delegates from all sec-lions, and aspiring lo "a prosperous Man- churia by uniting nil The communists have not de- clared war upon Chiang's Forces, party spokesman Wang Ping- Nan contended. He explained in (Continued on Page 2, Column 6) Ahloso School fo Open September 2 Ahloso school starts Monday, September 2, according to J. C. T.IVSIS, principal. "We know ol very few cases micrviow ncre that last Mon- The buildings are being mod- of agenls of any type who op- nny s i enan broadcasts urging crnizcd and the lunch room en- ci-aled under the of _UN- j'.] were larged. Serving of lunches will nn ....i i.... ,_ _ form of military control is bnscd RRA. These, only one has been positively identified as an NKVD (Russian) agent." McNarney said he issued the statement to "clarify the entire situation" because of "stories at- tacking the integrity and good Fnitli of thu U. S. military forces in Germany which have recently come out of the UNRRA council existing rate." The subsidies, ranging up lo 35 cents, a barrel, were invalidriled during Ihe. 25-day lapse of the price control law in July, but their payments were made' retro- active to July 1. when the new law was passed. The question of restoring price ceilings on petroleum and petrol- eum products, is to be included in the next branch of decisions handed down by the decontrol board. No deadline has been set: for this determination, since oil products are in the group 'of items including tobacco, eggs and congress has ordered free of control unless and until the three-man board rules otherwise. Read The News Classified Ads. He said Geneva." thnt not ;j declaration of war; ''it in no way mobilization of troops, but merely a moral mo- bilizalion. We have no desire to overthrow the (national) govern- ment." Casualties Still Mount Informed sources here said that only ;i week ago tlu; government and the communists had been nearer agreement than in months, nnd were discussing plans for a begin on September 3. Treas, Mrs. Treas and Mrs. Prcntis West compose the teach- ing force for the year. TH' School, land lease-hqldjrs poimnl n i nod nf K i a n g s u province, north made a "baseless and incorrect" coalition government. But Chi- chnrgc at the meeting lhat the tlll'.V added, had demanded U. S. army in Germany opposes! government control of Red-i continuation of UNIfRA in con-; ndmiiiisU'red counties i nection with the care nnd repa- trintion of disclosed persons. 'ENID, Aug. of slate school land lessees in Garfield, Grant, .Alfalfa, and Kny counties was scheduled here to- day to protest1 stale school land commission methods in school land sules in tills part of I lie state. link HUnlii, Jr. have complained .of commission and-run fronts. Shanghai, and communist, withdrawal from the enst-west Lunghai railroad of east-central China. These he reportedly made prereiiuisiti-s to any ceasefire or- der. So far as can bo learned, nei- ther side lias budged since and ca.'UialUrs still are flowing back daily from the far-ranging hil- melhods, asserting that Hems such as windmills, cisterns and other improvements to make the land habitable and more 'useful have been ignored in some ap- praisals. Head The News Classified Ads. ENID, Aug. 21, has been received here of Ihe de'uth in Denver, Colo., of Mrs. Lnura Wyalt, former Enid abstractor. Greater returns for amount, in- vcsled. Ada News Want Ads. Insurance is whul you buy an' never need 'til you let Hi1 premium lapse. As soon as th' candidate who ran on n platform "t' serve th' people" is elected, 'is memory seenu t' (aii.   

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