Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 20, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 20, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             for from being os lOphisHcoUd Boston, Mass., but appea ranee of a white steer on a downtown street to a rodeo certainly wouldn't produce a near panic in Ado. Net Jul.v Paid Circulation 8407 Mrmhfr: Audit llui-ran of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 1117 City Council Takes Action Monday Night Will Eitobliih City Plant Rerouting of Trucks, Worki on Woter Katei Decisions of the city council on Monday night ranged from ap- proval of regular bills to estab- lishment of ;i city Raj-age, prog- ress in revising of the city water system, and directions to the OTC to find (mother place for its buses to headquarter here. Luke n. Dodds, acting city manager, ulso made a report oh operation of parking meters since they placed in effect hist Wednesday noon. Full scale en- forcement of regulations involv- ing the meters goes into effect Wednesday morning. The board is continuing its pol- ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Jry of not reserving parking meter space for any individuals or concerns. City Garage Planned A garage will be establish- ed on city properly between Six- th and Seventh streets. There, eventually, all city cars, trucks, K! aders and other motorixed equipment will be kept when not in use, serviced with gas and oil and minor repairs made. A mechanic will be in charge of this work. War surplus equip- ment will be sought lo get neccs- iary mechanical facilities. A speedometer record will be xept of each machine as it in checked out and in. It is expected that considerable savings can be effected through concentrating oil and minor repair services in one place. Changing Some Progress was reported on the situation. Dodds reported that garages filling stations have not been on water meters. Meters are be- ing removed from churches arid hke institutions where the dollar minimum has always bpen charg- ed and placed a'l other spots where water use is to be charged on a metered basis. The council is getting addition- KI information and beginning t set a clearer picture of what i nc-edc-d and what is essential, be fore launching any plans for rom edy, with emphasis' on dccidinj what is absolutely necessary members say. The Oklahoma Transportation company is being notified that i must find another plucr for it: office and buses by Sept. V A present the office is in the Harri? iiotrl lobby find the buses park beside the hotel. The council points out tha. freaso and oil from the buses run :nto the dram nl the corner, ere almg a hazard, find that I he Jars? buses lend In restrict driv- space on the narrow avenue. The council is also having pre- an ordinance pertaining tc of trucks und especially iil u'lth inflammable cargoes out- of the btiMne.sN district. Parking Meter Rules Into Full Effect Starting Wednciday at 8 A. Driver Can Aik Cop To Show How to Manipu- late Moter Enforcement of reguls lions as provided by installation of parking meters will begin in full force Wednesday momms August 21, nt 8 o'clock, accordini to Luke B. Dodds, city manager Fines for non-observance will be from one dollar up. Says The important thing for thi automobile owner to remember i thai he himself must manipulate the meter by turning the handle to set the timing device in opera ion. Under no circumstances wil the police officer be authorized lo manipulate the meter cxcep for Ihe purpose of instruction. Police Will Show You But any police officer will be available to show a driver how to operate a meter. Instructions on how to set the metor are on the face of the met- er and the ones in use here are exceptionally easy lo understand and use. Can Find Out At Station If a driver wants to get the idea clearly before downtown parking, he can visit the 'police station where a meter has been installed, and there for one nickel he can get instruction and demonstration. In parallel curb parking, the operator must park so that the front wheel is adjacent to the meter and inside the lines on the street for each meter's cover- age. No Double Parkins; Most cities report lhal parking meters have made (more parking space available by eliminating tendencies to double park. Double parking here is 'out' from now n. Furthermore, there is an ordin- nnce prohibiting parking in al- leys and this is now being enforc- ed. Worth 01 Planes-No Hangars Lecki Facilities For Taking Care of Planet Flown Here by Rodeo Fans A number of visitors here for thr rodeo, who had flown va- rious types r.f planes, were ra- ther disappointed lo find no fa- cilities for taking care of their W. G. Rkelly. oil producer, re- marked tlutt a place the sixe of Ada certainly have a bot- tf-r equipped nil-port, especially Ada continues to progress iii sti ide thiit it hits done. Dui-ing the past weekend there w e r c approximately worth of planes at loral airports ivjlh no hangers available. NORM A N, President George L. Cross of Ok Jahoma university has imnounccc a priority plan under which for rr-.er servicemen will receive pre- ference for university rooms and apartments during the school's iirst semester this year. Meters have been installed, Dodds reminds, for the benefit of the entire community, to relieve congest ion, and the cooperalion of the entire driving public is r quested. Also, it is unlawful for an pc-rson lo "deface, tamper wit! damage', or wilfully break, d slroy or impair the uscfulnes of any parking meter." This pro vision will be enforced rigidly and parents will be held reiipon siblc for any clwrnage done t meters by minor children. -h- Italy Under Fire for Her Non-War Plea O, Aug. first shipment of silk cloth from Japan since the occupation will Jravr for the United States before ir.p end of the month. Five mil- lion yards of assorted grades for industrial and clothing purposes ordered "unfrozen" for im- mediate shipment. WEATHER fair lo- nirht and Wednesday; slightly warmer extreme north Weclnes- dav. FORECAST FOR AI.'G, 20-2.1 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma find Nebraska--Scattered thun- der timwrrs southern Oklahoma Wednesday night Thursday ;md most of district Thursday or I'ridijy: precipitation except moderate to heavy southern Oklahoma: warmer inost of dis- trict Wednesday; cooler with precipitation; warmer Saturday J..id Sunday; temperatures aver- ting about 8 degrees above nor- Continue Leonard Hearing In Horn Death lo Aug. 22 After two witnesses had been heard, pucliminary hiMiring o Hoberl Leonard on charges o iritintilnutfhUir, first degree, continued to Thursday, Auguii 22, by Frank flourland, justice of the pence. were filed on Lrsonarc ns the driver of a car in which Mrs, Nncllnc Horn was riding when it crashed into a truck lorth of Ada recently, causint njurics that resulted in hei leiith. In the justice court of Percy Armstrong, preliminary hearing ins been set for Thursday, Aug 22, at 11 a.m. for Kenneth Wootl- uff, charged with reckless driv- I1R- Me is said in the to invc been driving pickup truck vhich wfls involved in a heodon ollision three miles east (if Strat- ord last week in which Mrs, levers, Route 2, Stratford, was alally injured. Bourlaricl, after hearing the use of Troy Cnllicoal, ccusod of violation of Ihe rules f the road, fined the defendant 5 and costs. Glenn Clark, hlgh- patrolman, filed the com- plninl. A charge of reckless driving, filed by Clark against Tom Lee Laughlin, was scheduled lo be taken up in Bourland's court Tuesday afternoon. A charge of assault and battery against Tom Crow resulted in fine of and costs in the Bour- lancl court. He is alleged to have hit Berlin Crow wilh a small electric Ktqye. ____ Comedian Ragland Dies in Hollywood HOLLYWOOD, Aug. Comedian John (Rags) Ragland, 40, who rose from burlesque to Broadway and the movies, died this morning in Cedars of Leban- on hospital after nn illness of sev- eral months. England, whose lust movie was Hoodlum first hit star- Endeavoring To Soften References of Treaty He> Parr with Nazis PARIS, Aug. proposals lor modifying the Ital lan peace treaty draft failed of endorsement in a peace confer- ence committee today. After seven and one half hours discussion of an Italian note to the conference's polilical and ter- ritorial committee for Italy seek- ing modifications in the peace treaty draft, the commitlec adop- ted a motion reading: "The. chairman noted that the suggestions contained in the Ital- an memorandum were not taken up in the form in which they were presented ns amendments any delegation and were, .hereforc, not endorsed as such." ''Ppland was at war with Italy.' said Polish delegate. "Polish soldiers fought in North Africa ind Italy, Polish soldiers were tilled by Italian bullets. Was his a state of war or a state of Claim Challenged Belgium, Yugoslavia and the Netherlands likewise challenged he Italian claim, which was pre- ented in a proposed amendment o preamble of the Italian reaty. taken up by the Italian 'olttical and territorial commit- ee. Italy suggested that a state- ment in the preamble that Italy was at war "with all" allied pow- rr be altered to read "some" of rte conference nations. The memorandum suggested al- o that a sentence saying "Itaiy, nder the fascist regime, because party to the tripartite pact" ba mended to read: "Italy was led y the fascist regime to become party to the tripartite pact." The memorandum criticized ie omission of any reference to vhat it 'called "the active role layed by the Italian people" in verthrowing Mussolini's regime. It urged the deletion of the tirase- "surrendered uncondition- ally.' in, the preamble's reference to the capitulation of July 25, 1B43, and. called for n reference to ,Italy's material share in the war against Germany which last- ed for' 18' months." Denien Some Were EnemieK No hostilities actually occurred between Italy and Poland, Bel- gium, the Netherlands and Czech- oslovakia, the Italian note said, "and the nationals of those slates wore never considered in Italy to be enemy A Netherlands delegate com- mented that the Netherlands had declared war on Italy through n note delivered by the Swedish minister in Rome, but that Italy had not accepted the nole, hold- ng Ihat the Netherlands "no ionger existed." A Yugoslav delegate said "Ihs spirit of Ihe Italian amendment n general, lo eliminate Italian responsibility, in Ihe war from connection with Ihe present re- This, he said, "is alto- (elher inacceplnble." He Huid taly WHS "a major asset for Gor- nany in Ihe war" that the preamble should be strengthened lhan modified. (The committee had debated ov- er? whether it should proceed with discussion of the Italian reaty Of adjourn pending sub- nission of suggested amendments o the draft. Yugoslav Official Defends Shooting Down U. S. Plane, U. S. Officials Investigate CALIFORNIA BOY WINS SOAP BOX DERBY: Gilbert Klecan of San Diego, Calif., holds trophy as his mother proudly hugs him "'T TT SoaP Box Derby at Akron, Ohio. Decision Tonight On Food Price Ceilings Decontrol Board to Announce If Major Items at Meatt, Milk, Butter Return to Control; OPA Ready If They Do By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITH WASHINGTON, Aug. nation learns to- night whether such major dinner-table .items as meats, milk and butter are going back under price'ceilings. As the climax of nine days of searching, study, the price decontrol board will announce its decision at about 7 p. rh. Chinese Reds Given Blunt Memorandum Government Threatcni Full Attack on Stronghold To Relieve Tatung By TOM MASTEKSON PEIPING, Aug. government confirmed today that it had dispatched a blun't memorandum to the Chinese Communists threatening to at- tack 1. h e Communist strong- holds of Yenan, Knlgnn and Chcngluh to relieve government defending besieged Ta- the Yuian radio had (Eastern Standard Senerally Cooler Stale's Outlook Soma Scattered Thiindar- thowert Alto Heat To Rtturn Thit Week By, Generally AMocUted 1'rcn cooler weather ompanicd by from light to heavy cattered thundershowers was the )klahoma weather outlook for ie next few days, but a'return o above normal temperatures as'forecast for the weekend. The statewide forecast primis- d scattered showers to reach the xtr'eme southern; section late uesd'ay afternoon, spreading ver about half of southern Ok- homa'by Wednesday. The ex- nded forecast predicted thun- dersHowers in the southern half of the state Thursday and Fri- day, but the mercury was ex- pected to rise again to an aver- age of about eight degrees above Rain Satisfactory, Lightning Struck In Several Places Rain that fell here Sunday night; gave people living in this area a tunic .for more uiul also furnished a start back from the scawng conditions thnt develop-- eel during seven weeks of drought and severe heat. The showers thru continued after 7 o'clock Monday morning added .15 of nn inch to make the total 1.B4 inches, heaviest report- ed for the entire stale. And Ihe way Ihe rain came was sails fn c to ry, .for it wasn't the washing kind but u gentle down- sour and then .lighter showers that gave the ground a chance to soak up practically all o'f it. Additional reports have come in of 'lightning striking here and there about the city. The O. G. .E. truck was call- ed to two places when transform- ers were struck. One was be- hind Adams Lumber company, t. the other in the ROO block cast t tne ceilings will be. The board plans lo say whether ceilings will be rustorecl on live- stock, dairy products, grains, cot- ton seed, soy beans and hundreds of products derived from these basic commodities. Will Go On Air At 9 p.m.. -the three members will explain in an all- network radio broadcast why they decided as they did. even if the board or- ders conlroln re-estnblishccl on any of the items lnvolvo.01, the new cuilingK will not become ef- fective until Friday, OPA Boss Paul Porter announced last night. "We do not know what the board's decision will Porter said in a statement. "A little time, therefore, is nec- essary for business to readjust itself lo such recontrol as 'the board may order and to permit the administrator to de- termine what specific changes in the (price) regulations may be required by the decision of the board." Announce Any Ceilings Later .This means, OPA officials said, that if the board orders re-estab- lishment of controls, OPA will defer until Wednesday or Thurs- troops lung. Earlier reported the government threat, and said such attacks would mean the start of full-scale civil war. Lt. Gen. Tsai Wen-Chih, gov- ernment chief of staff at execu- tive (truce) headquarters in Peiping, said the memorandum was sent by Gen. Cheng Kai-Min to Communist Gen. Yeh Chien- Ying, both commissioners at ex- ecutive headquarters. Trial Balloon? Evidently failure of executive headquarters to hall the Com- munist attack on Tutting, a coal and rail center 125 miles west of Peiping, h n d prompted General Cheng's threat, which many here regarded as a possible trial bal- loon on the part of the govern- ment. Military news was lacking .from Tatung itself but the Cath- olic newspaper Yi Shih Pao re- ported new outbreak of fight- ing in Shansi province along the south section of Talung-Puchow railroad. The Communists were said to have captured Hingtung and isolated the village of Chao- cheng. Tailing.Fall I.s Near Fall of encircled Tatung has been reported imminent. The first set-back for execu- tive' headquarters in attempting to settle the Tatung dispute oc- U. S., Britain Expect Tito Agree About Dardanelles France Joins in Unqualified Oppoiition to Rutiian De- on Straits lly JOHN M. HIGIITOWER WASHINGTON. Aug. United Slates and Great Britain have decided to meet Russia on the issue of the Dardanelles, (A foreign office spokesman in London snid France hud joined th.e United States and Britain in expressing to Russia unqualified opposition to Soviet proposals for sharing with Turkey the military control of the Straits. A copy of the French note to Russia has been sent to Britain, Turkey, and the United States, he said. An in- formed government source in London predicted that an inter- national conference, with the United Slates represented, would be cnlled on the Dardanelles this To Explain Plane Affair Eye-Witneii Sayt Twe Fighter Planet Shot Down American Transport BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, Aug. 20. A spokesman within the Yugoslav government said to- day that "our pilots did the right thing in commenting on the curred when cease-fire Learn wont into the field lo meet the Communist attackers. The Com- munist team member promptly disappeared. Without, him the team no longer could function, so it withdrew. The Yenan radio, proclaiming that attacks on its main cities would launch full-scale civil war reported that one government plane "dislurbed" Yenan Mon- day, und Ihat six civilians were killed ami J7 wounded in KnJ- S'in AUK. .13 by government plnnos. Government publications ro- porUjd casualties in the northern In cards on the table gesture, this country already has inform- ed Moscow that it is flatly oppos- ed to Soviet demands for n voice in the military control of that highly important water link be- tween the Mediterranean and the Black Sen. Two Sland With Turkey Furthermore, diplomatic offici- als who reported this action said Great Britain will take the same step, if she hasn't one so. Thus the two big western pow- ers are siding firmly with Tur- key, current guardian of the Dardanelles, upon whom Russia has served two highly unpalat- able demands: 3. That the Straits should be jointly defended by Turkish and Soviet forces, and 2. That future control policies should be laid down by agree- ment among the Black Sea pow- ers alone. Fciir KiiNsian Domination To the first demand this coun- try is said lo have objected on the ground that it virtually shooting down of an unarmed American transport plane yester- day and forcing another to land earlier. "They did nothing which was not m coordination wjth-our own and international said the spokesman, who declined to quoted by name. Tlie govern- ment itself refused official com- ment. Cannon Hear if A person who saw the second C-47 attacked yecterdny said the big transport went down spiral- ling in black smoke during an attack by two Yugoslav fighters Four or five cannon shots could be heard. Only two parachutes were seen to open from the plane, which carried five crewmen. No passengers, aboard. or cargo was between Fifteenth arid Sixteenth, The homo of O, A. Bay less, 531 west Twenty-third, was struck by lightning tmrl n cluster of shingles, sprayed into the yard but the bolt failed to set'.fire to the house. Lightning damaged the home of W. M. Massengale, entering the living room. day any announcement of what "ie ceilings will be. The three-man board stayed nnrd -lit work on its job as 'the deadline approached. .Late last evening it still was collecting in- formation on what has happened to prices on the items congress specifically deconlrolle. As it prepared to resume dis- cussions this the board reportedly has cleared away ail Kill j _ A_ i _ J Tulsa Pilots Look For Air Veferan W. R. Pleasant Unrepaired On Return Flight TULSA, Okln., Aug. 20, Ten Pulsa pilots searched the between here and Hot r Ark., by air today for William R. Pleasant, 21-year-old air force veteran, unreorted i Monday afternoon the sun was'! few details. beaming again or. this area, run- i What the decisions may be re- ning'the temperature up to 92 degrees. Monday night the effect of the rain was felt in a minimum of 70 degrees, much cooler than for preceding nights, lorn on Broadway J-li.s first in "Panama movie was 'Whixlling In the 194J. A memorial service i.s ively scheduled here later this vec-k, followed by burial in .ouisvilli., Ky., hiK birthplace. His only survivor is his son, John, Jr., of Louisville. the season's and Sunday. normal 'Saturday TULSA, Aug. 20, keel shooters will hold their irst championship tourney In we years at Southern Hills 'ountry Club Saturday and Sun- ay. Temperatures Monday ranged from a high of 10.1 at Frederick" to a maximum of only 76 at Boise City m the extreme western part of the state.' consistently the state's hot spot during the recent heat wave, tied with Bart- lesvillc, Chandler and Sailisaw for an overnight low reading of 60 decrees. Heaviest rain was at Ardmore, where U.-18 Inches were recorded. Frederick's .35 inches was next, Lnwton had .26 inches. PARIS, Aug. Kentatives of Inbor parties of 17 nations, including the United Sta- tes, will meet here Aug. 26 nnd 27 to establish a common socialist policy toward Franco Spnin, thu party headquarters announced to- day. The'American socialist par- ty is lo be represented by Phil Heller, the announcement said. mained one of the mosl closely guarded secrets in Washington. Even, the two agencies most di- rectly and the agriculture department snid they had no inkling of the final word. Muni Decide On Subsidies In addition- to a decision on ceilings the board also must de- cide whether subsidies are to; be restored.. Should the. board rule for ceil- mgs but against revival of sub- sidies, or cut the previous rate of payment, restoring this Wife of Colonel Takes Own Life NEW YORK, Aug. Mrs. Genevieve Phelps, 45, wife of Col. Robert Phelps, former military governor of Frankfurt, died early today at Roosevelt hos- pital from a bullet wound police said was self-inflicted. Police said Mrs. Phelps, whose home is in Saginaw, shot herself in the left temple shortly before 10 a.m., yesterday in the Phelps suite nl the Hotel Wind-' sor, -with a small revolver- her husband had. brought home as a souvenir from Germany. Mrs. Pholps Hhol herself, police said, in the bedroom of the suite U'hiln her hti.sbiinj, hoi- Id-year-, old daughter, Mary Lou, and a' la-yenr-old son, John, wore hav- ing breakfast in the hotel dining room, Police said the colonel, was on terminal leave and the family hud arrived here Sunday from Sag- inow where Mrs. Phelps had been _ _, luuny, suffering trom a nervous condi- I tion looked forward II) an, unreported in return flight yesterday from Arkansas City. Pleasant was reported to hnve Hot sP'-inKs airport at last night to make the hour and forty minute flight to iulsii after transporting a pas- senger whom Detective Jack Scnmidt said was wanted by po- lice for questioning in a forgery case. Schmidt said that Pleasant, ap- parently unaware his passenger was wanted by police, took off from the north side'airport yes- terday afternoon as two police (Continued on Page 2 Column G) Outrageous, Says Acheson; Third U.S. Note to Yugoslavs WASHINGTON, Aug. of State Ache- son, in charge of the stale de- partment in the absence of Sec- retary Byrnes, today bluntly de- nounced u Yugoslav attack on an American plane os "an outra- geous performance." Acheson made this character- ization as the United States handed Ihe Yugoslav government a new and emphatic third disclosed in two days, Acheson took the u n'u s u a I course of permitting reporters at, his news conference lo quote him directly on the phrase "outra- geous performance" and lashed out at Yugoslav's treatment of planes in the area near Trieste by saying that it was not the type of action one would expect from friendly country. Nat Help ll'iit AiUtck The latest American noto Dins: "1.1 would be assumed that the authorities of Yugoslavia would wish to render a maximum of as sistancc und succor to aircraft a friendly nation when the lattei are forced by the hazards of nav- igation in bad woollier over dan- gerous mountain barriers to dev- It was not Immediately clear over what national territory the plane was a Hacked. The witnesses said large col- umn of black smoke arose from the Julian Alps where the trans- pprl came down, indicaling it ex- ploded. tujoslav Military Silent American embassy who called the earlier attack wicked, inexcusable and delib- erule, said they were investi- gating the new incident, but that Yugoslav military authorities de- clined to give any information. Bj GEORGE PALMER BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, _ Til n t 1 j" 20, fooked shal Tito himself today for planntion of an eye-witness me- 1 nt _ K count describing )y n large lo be a miss- ing American C-47 plane' was- shot down in flames by two Jugoslav fighter planes over Julian Alps yesterday. fJn Washington, Ihe U. S slate department, revealing a state of near war between Amor- can and Yugoslav troops at Jriesle, accused Yugoslav forces of making illegal into American occupation zone and of unprovoked uliucka on American soldiers. Britain Alio (The British foreign office in London said that it had pro- tested in the strongest terms a- gamst invasion of the allied zone nnd attacks on British und Amer- ican The transport was the second U. S. craft reported missing over Yugoslavia this month, on Ihe Vienna lo Udine, Italy, run of the European air transport service. The other, ako ,1 was forc- ed to land uifder gunfire on Aug. The eyewitnes, whose reliabil- ity is unquestioned, said the two fighters closed in on the trans- oort yesterday morning south- west of Klagenfurt, Austria, 14 miles north of the Yugoslav bor- der, (This dispatch did not state iate from their bearings over lory." course and seek Yugoslav terri- cars arrived to arrest the man. ct'att .seen fit without pro- would preclude 30 ceilings on uiOXl. meats, OPA officials said. By the same token, they added, plans to roll back milk prices to one cent a -quart-above June 30 levels would have to be abandoned. Aug. 2oT Commander B.-B. Kies, former- ly senior medical officer at the naval, ammunition depot at Mc- Aiester, has accepter! a position with the veterans administration. Recently released from active duty after six years of service, Kies will be n medical specialist for. evaluation of dis- abilities of veterans here. MOSCOW, the Soviet. Union's grain acreage- has been harvested, the Moscow press reported, today, und the mi- to an end Tulsa authorities wired ahead! however, nnd the passenger was arrested when Pleasant landed nt Hot Springs. Mrs. A. E. Kobe! of Kobcl's FJyinK Service said Pleasant uudied his course carefully be- fore taking olf. Landing at'night n the hilly and wooded country over which lie traveled would bo extremely difficult, Mrs. Kobe! "On the the note continued, "Yugoslav fighter air- vious warning to tnke aggressive action ngninsl such n United Stales transport plane, the iden- tification of which was clearly apparent from its markings .-ind hnve forced it to crash land after wounding one of its- passengers. "Subsequently, Yugoslav aulh- oties have detained the plane, its crew and passengers and refused to permit American consular of- said. However it was possible, ficers access to the plane or per- she stated, that the pilot brought i spnncl until specific representn- his plane down and was "walk- lions were made by the United ing out." ?lal9.s embassy to the latter cf- Pleasant was unrcporlcd this morning, pl.-irics piloted by Bill Bowers, C. H. Hoffman, Floyd Walts and six other private pilots began the search. LONDON, foreign office Aug. 20.- declined- comment to bread rationing in the autumn. ludn.v on 1.1 broadcast' by the Mos- cow radio asserting that Turkey hud mobilized men and U. S. Dcmnnil Renewed The; note said (hat "the embas- sy is instructed' to protest most emphatically against, this action and al.tiliido of the Yugoslav au- thorities, to renew the United Stales demand for immediate re- lease of the passengers and crew now able lo travel, and in con- clusion to request snge." The nature of this message was not disclosed, nnd a subse- quent broadcast said it was un- certain whether the message came from Bagdad or Beyrouth, Lebanon. tcsios, including Ihe right of in- nocent passage over Yugoslav territory (o United States air- craft when stress of weather nec- essitates such deviation from reg- ular routes." whether the attack occurred over Austria or Yugoslav territory. The area is near the zone "B" border in 1he region where Yugo- slavia .iuts northward to join It- aly and At Least Two 'Chutcd The witness said the transport was seen to "spiral to the ground persons in a column of black and that at Jeast two parachuted. Four or five shots wore heard from the ground near the Yugo- slav summer resort of Bltd. where Marshal Tito was reported to be vacationing, the witness ad- (Continued on Page 2 Column 6) TH' PESSIMIST iiT nob niMiu, Some fellers hold the'r others 're married. Gather Harp, who had neat litiK; nost egg saved after twenty years, wuz wiped out th' other day when lie had a couple teeth pulled.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication