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Ada Evening News: Sunday, August 18, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - August 18, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Of course we oren't wanting twisters like those that Saturday struck in Kansas and Minnesota, but we do have some changes we'd very much like to recommend to the state weatherman.  V * *|r Vet Jul\ I'aid t Im u tat ton  8407  Member %udit ltuir-.au of ((nutation  THE ADA EVENING NEWS  FINAL EDITION  4 rd War—No. 1(15  ADA, OKLAHOMA, SONDAY, At Ll ST IS, MHU  KIVI. CENTS Till; COPY  FINAL ADA RODEO SHOW THIS AFTERNOON  Russians Lose Vote To Keep Austrians From Giving Views  Conference Then Approves Soviet Suggestion Iron Be Invited to Present Views on Draft Treoty for Italy  Bv LOLIS NEVIN  PARIS Aug Ii (AP) The European peace conference,  t !.:ng (I >\vn Russian objections, voted 15 to 6 today to in-• te A .st! a to present its views on the draft treaty with Italy,  ‘    *    •    n    approved unanimously a Soviet suggestion that Iran  also be invited.  Championed by Britain and ■■§    |    ^    supported    by    the    United    States,  I lahtenina - h °  Aust, ; i;m  proposal provided  Meter Rule  'Right in Der Fuehrer's Face!'  City to Enforce Parking Met cr Regulations More Strictly os Use Becomes Familiar  ,p a  L  lent of the paiking at ions will be tighten-v notches when the over and the lodoo gone from Ada, Man B Dodos said Satur-  w e  s t  mg  n't  pa  [fig Lr things close eve on  vv e - a  v se< kept rkers. ti'.ey h.iVf* ticketed liber of these, and now I they do not leport col,vt in thief en SI.  ra n the driving public I islands the use of the I  rn     w __  mg f ; use* of  • wa,King some distance. This  * iangc ro.is a real hazard to %'hit ii n time of fire i uns and I. t be • in. na ted now  *  Twister Damages Airport, Hangar  Arther Airfield ot Wichita Hos Plane Destroyed, 11 Damaged  V. It'HITA  v  c.  - by  the Austrian  that the former enemy state be invited to explain its point of view en the Italian treaty “on the same terms as Albania, Mexico, Cuba and Egypt,”  All six Slav nations opposed tile move, which a Russian dele gate said was intended to air Austi la’s claim to the South Ty rob  Suggest Big Lour Meet  The debate prompted a suggestion that the Big Four bold meetings outside the plenary sessions to speed the work of the con former, which has not yet gotten down to the task for which it was summoned the drawing of recommendations to the foreign I    ministers' council on the treaties  at into use    Wed i    for Italy, F inland and the Balkan  I* * •’ h *4*    e I..*’'    na! nm ;  The conference wound up Its third week today, and impatience over delay has lx*en manifest a-mong the smaller nations. This morning Brooke Claxton of Canada said “it might be a good thing days, t    if some of the leaders of the Big  Four could meet in order to facilitate more rapid work.”  Russia Loses Vote Test *'    enforcement    I    he Russians this afternoon at  put    into effect*    organizational meetings of the   1     ;;' 3 y  sa >f* some    have    Bulgarians and Hungarians poll  ing n alleys to escape j tical and territorial commissions use of parking space < again tried to limit tho right to!  vote in commission only to conn tries which actually had been at war with former enemy states.  F ranee again objected, supported by Britain and the United States.  Voting with the Soviet Union against the Austrian proposal wen* White Russia, I* o land. Czechoslovakia, Uh Yugoslavia.  Soviet Delegate Vishmskv declared the proposal was Austria’s claim to the South Ty rol "which was rejected by the council of foreign ministers.”  He said that "if this is only a question of the South Tyrol, it j would seem to me the most prop *-r way would Fie to raise it be ; fore a commission If the conference wants to invite Austria it ; ran do it, Fiut the Soviet dele-i nation does not think it is neces-sury.”  Fair, Says American  Hector McNeil of the British I delegation asserted that failure to hear Austria on the future of the Halo Austrian frontier would he “discrimination” by the peace conference because it had established a policy of “permitting both sides to ho heard here.”  U. s. State Department Conn J seller Benjamin V. Cohen said the American viewpoint was that j “Austria should have the right to: in- present her views here. It seems the jto us that it would take less time to hear the views of Austria than to debate their light to be heard.”  Sooner Horse Pits Ten Finalists Grand Champ In Each Rodeo Event  For Big Prize Cash  Finale of Eleventh Ado Rodeo to Present Cowboys In Their Contests, Features That Hove Won Acclaim  These German women are laughing tit to kill—at none other than Charlie Chaplin burlesqueing their oncc-bolo\ed Adolf Hitler. I he t haplm film, “The drest Dictator,*' was tecenlly sprung by surprise on an audience ot some 400 Berliners, who thought they w'rre going to see "Kitty Foyle.” Experiment was conducted by the lnfoimation control division of Amel lean Military Government,  Owned Now by Texon; Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association Show, Roces Big Success  Many persons attending the rodeo the last few' days found out §why there is so much ado about I quarter horses, that breed that has evolved from the cow pony.  They found the Oklahoma Quarter Horse association show ’ and races an interesting place to Im*, for both the reining, cutting I and roping contests and races of | the afternoon and tin* halter class judging of the mornings.  They saw' last year’s grand champion. Chico, fail to reach the top and a two year old stallion take grand champion honors among the stallions and a I yeai old of that champion w in his class and indicate the next year he ll be in the big competition.  It was Red Star Joe, bred and raised on the ii A- X Ranch seven miles from Council Hill. that was selected Grand Champion St a I lion. A full brother won the year ling class but won t be eligible to take a whirl at grand  Report Reds, British I Danish Award Arms on Iran Border To Linscheid  This Ycor  A fast finale to a fast rodeo is scheduled for this afternoon at 2 o'clock, and fans who have a good idea of what is coming up will be there right on tune.  Today the competitive angle of the rodeo a great show with its features and fun will really dominate the program. for each event will have the ten top men remaining after four days of grueling contests.  Storm Hits Tourist (amp in Minnesota, Several Are Killed  Premier Worried Over Rumored Rut,ion Movements In North, British Decision to Move Troops Into Basra  By JOSEPH C. GOODWIN  TEHRAN, Aug. IT. (AP) An official foreign source who requested anonymity said today that cabled reports from the northern frontier Midi eat cd the Russians had massed be tween 15 and 25 divisions possibly as many as 115,000 men along the Araxes river boundary between Iran and Soviet Russia.   11  "        r    111   .....................  This    official,    who said tin  ports came bom “qualifi  Ukraine, and  Andrei Y I the object of j to bring up j  Dr. Linsdieid In Final Appeal For Help on Housing  t  Has . Aug IT .T> iii* was destroyed, ll ■ dan.aged and the n off the main hang-tw ;>‘er struck Arthur air-i the southwest edge of curing a violent thun-n late today E hard, one of the own-  * fitId, estimated damage HIO rni said the figure W t i $75,000.  ■ the planes were chained R: und. lh hard sa.d. but  • of th* wind mapped the looping the planes. Three irried 300 yards.  ■ f of the hangar was car's ’I U.<* air, landing on : lanes, demolishing one, tis away.  ed Grimes, working said he felt  the hangar £.e a w»- y .  must have lear go* >r.  : remember . p a n ; sa w  been blown out he said, “for I running I look-the roof sailing  V,  s V head It was at least 40  ' the damaged planes ned b* the field.  Wilson Airfield, east of a Di L B Putnam e*-n . '• when the light ire was landing crashed : the storm. Dr. Putnam ( was a bout nine feet from w. i when the wind drop  •a und the heel of the »und The bo in ba k abe w as est  : ght wing and plane struck the ship flipped over Damage to the im a ted at SHOO.  R \c» trouble: near SERIOUS OUTBREAK  SWEDESBORO, N. J. Aug 17. —Two hundred negroes and  v  P* - ms scuffled in a restaurant tonight, and New Jersey state p e were called into as-s.st !■#< al authorities as iostlers 8 n - cf men gathered on the  Byng School Will Enroll on Friday  Buses Run That Day, Classes Begin Sept. 2  Byng school will enroll Friday, August 30, with school to begin the following Monday, September 2.  Supt J. E Teague announces that til** buses will make their routes on Friday for the enroll-: merit  The teaching force includes League; Marvin Stokes, principal Nolan Wade, Bill Roller, Margaret Wood, FNtal inc Waters, Zuleka Burkhart, Veneta Bran- j  om. Lula Wood, Ouida Stokes, Janue Sue Ward and Bertha Frank Teague.  groups were quiet but ap-;  • red to tie “waiting for some j rig t happen.” the state police  d.  I ■    ’    hance    st    a:    ted    in    An  estaurant. a stall* police j Kl man said, after negroes i en I- :< y a section of the i es  -an* normally reserved for  iU patrons.  103 on Saturday  Hottest Day at End Of Hot Week for Ada  WEATHER  OKLAHOMA Fair and hot mth, scattered thunderstorms i rn ‘ so warm north Sunday: ■- w partly cloudy, scattered •    ■    • cr* s ut; Cast.  Over KHI degree weather pre sailed most of last week. reaching its hottest Saturday afternoon with 103 degrees.  Earlier there had been one 101 and three 102 degree readings. Friday s being j u 8 t one notch under Saturday’s.  Friday night didn’t help out much, cither, for it marked up another of the warmish 78 do-ftree minimums that happened along this week.  *  Read The News Classified Ads.  Dr. A. Linscheid makes a fi na! appeal for aid of • iii Zena here to help Hast Central college take rare of some housing need- for students for a time. as follows;  To the Householders of Ada Ladies and Gentlemen  The housing of students is the greatest p r o b I e rn confronting East Central State college. Although the Federal Public Housing Authority and the Veterans Administration have done and are doing all they can do to help us, it is certain that many more students are applying for admission to this College than this In Ititution can house. It will hav< to turn away many students; some of them veterans.  The college is crowding its dormitories full of students, just as far as is consistent with health standards; it has made additional rooms available in its dormitories.. The apartments built for us by tin* Public Housing Authority are all rented and the thirty five apartments now under construction will not he leady for oc cupaney until November IO. Veterans with families have applied for (-very one of them. All of this add up to the sentence. “The Col loge needs rooms for three types of students;”  1. Rooms in East Ada tor un married students, veterans and non-veterans, who plan to he here for the school year. These rooms  1  should be sufficiently close to the j college that occupants can get their meals in the college dining hall, unless the householder plans to board the roomers.  2. Apartments for the - school year for married students and their families.  3. Apartments for thirty-five veterans* families for two months, or perhaps a little longer, who will occupy the apartments now under construction when these are completed.  It should be remembered that; students (annot pay high prices for rooms. In general, $7-SI0 a month per student with two in j a room is about all that they can  !   pay.  The College w ill go forward if it, together with friends, can pro- i vide housing If it cannot do so. j it will go backward. If you can provide any one of the three types of accommodations named above, call the College Secretary, phone 3040.  Very sincerely,  A. Linscheid, President ♦  LAWTON. Okla., Aug. IT IM  Funeral services will bt* h Id here Monday for Rollie ll Allen, 40, prominent Lawton grocery man who died late yesterday. He had been critically ill for t h e past two weeks.  re-md-  itary observers * described 11k* troops a “typical lied army mountain units and added they wore deployed for 38 miles ca t of D/.huifa, border city 80 mile; north of Ta bi i/.  Tass Denies It  t The official Soviet agency Tass said yesterday it had been authorized to deny similar re ports, attributed to Hussein Ala. Iranian am bas sa dot to the United States.  (Ala said in Washington Tues day that he had received some reports that the Russians had J concentrated troops in the eau casus north of Iran, hut that his I information did not indicate their purpose. He added that they might he used to counter Bi di Ii pressure against Iran in the | south, or to bring pre sure on I Turkey in view of Russia’s proposals for a hand in direct control and defense of the Dardanelh-I (Ala said the British had j brought in mechanized Indian 'troops at Basra, Iraq, on the Iranian border near the Bi itish op crated oil fields, creating a serious situation involving Brit-ain, Iraq and Iran.)  The foreign informant estimated tho average strength of the Red army divisions at 5.000 men leach with “mechanized divisions i probably slightly smaller.”  Take Strategic Position Deployment of the Russian ti oops east (d D/hulfa would place them near tho head of rail j and highway lines into Azerbai .tan province, which the Russians evacuated last May.  I The American military attache Col. William T. Sexton, and three j aides left here last week for Tabriz en route to the northern frontier. They were arrested bv Aid haijan democrats in Tabriz last June lit and later released Premier Ahmed Qnvam is “greatly concerned” over the rumored Russian troop move mi nts in the hoi th and the Brit » Ii decision to move Indian troops into Basra, a highly placed diplomatic source said, a boatload of troops arrived at Basra today, I chi an newspapers reported.  modal. I to you my  i. of Den  -w  Allen Schools To Open September 2  Enrollment Set for That Date, Buses to Make Usual Schedules  Allen public schools will open j Monday, September 2, according I to Supt. Loyd R. Watson.  Enrollment of both Fugh schools and grade pupils will be on that Monday and buses will tun a usual that day.  Watson announces that he has a lull corps (*f teachers as of to I day. This includes 20 regular in struct ors and two veteran in struct ors for the Veterans Farm j Training program.  King Christion's Medal Of Liberation Received By College Head  On August 0. Dr. A Linschied, president ot East Central, receives the fallowing letter from the Dan h Embassy at Washington?  I he»<*bv have the honor and plea uro to inform you that on May fifth, UMH, the anniversary of the lib* ration of Denmark, His Majesty tin* King has most gi.i ck ai 1\ bestowed on you "Kong Chn 11.rn den Tiendes Friheds mcdaillc” (King Christian X’s Medal of I,(beration) as an appreciation of your contribution to Den ma 11-.    • am e dm mg the years  of Nazi occupation.  in fin v.ai ling tin should like to convey heat tv cong! ululation Pov I Bang Jensen,  Charge d Affairs a mark.  With the letter came a stiver medal fa Funned by the Imperial Court Jeweler at Copenhagen. Dr. Linscheid has frequently spoken of the remarkable prosperity Denmark had achieved during the period after she wait conquered by the Prussians in 1884 and the outbreak of World War II. her astonishing improve moots in rural education, and her oremplary conduct in leaving her German boundary entirely undefined. depending on the rectitude of tier actions for her sole deter) a*.  Some excerpts from Dr. Lindina! s speeches were printed rn national education magazines, and it is the opinion that thine dal was awarded him on tile , basis of these speeches.  Dr. Linscheid says, “I accept tin., medal gratefully as a mam festation of Denmark s friend ship “  McLish Schools To Open September 2  Enrollment to Be Friday, August BO, at 9 A. M.; Two New Faculty Member*  McLish public schools will open lot ( lass work on Sept 2, Supt J. R. McKee!, announces. Enrollment will bo held on F’n-dav. Align I 30, at 0:00 a iii Book list. w ill be handed out .at that : tune All students are urged to he present Friday morning so that enrollment can tx* as complete j » possible and classes begin promptly Monday morning.  Two new' faculty members wull he here tins year. Alva Henry will teach shop and Milton Arilloid will teach commercial work. Both departments are expanded this year. Good attendance last year made it possible to add one teacher this year, hence tin* ox panel sd schedule.  Other faculty members are: Supt J. N. McKee!; Amel Sales, jll S principal; Ethel Tuck. Mrs Dcuoth J a rn a i-, Mr? Alme Orv. Mrs Alma Sales, Mrs. Helen Pearce. Mrs. Bernice Stewart. Miss Louise McLaughlin, Miss Juanita Townsend. Mrs. Jean Heard and Mi Ila Clark.  +  OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug 17  I I’ Gov Kerr will leave Tuesday by airplane f<»i Minnesota to spend about ten days with his (ami)' on vacation, he said today.  Greater returns for amount in I vs ted. Ada News Want Ads.  MANKATO, Minn. Aug 17 . t/R) At least five persons were imam- J killed and more than 50 injured tonight in a tornado t h a t momentarily dipped from th#* sky to destroy a 22 catan tourist ramp in scenic Minnesota river valley, three miles southwest of Man k.tto  Deputy Sheriff Hem v Schwa I ckei t of Blue Earth court tv said earlv reports to hun indicated the death list may total 15  til#* five known dead were re potted by Fat Wold, ambulance driver, who made several trips j to the storm area to bi mg injured t«# hospitals.  Wold, one of the fn*-t to arrive I at tFie scene, said “Then* u#*i»* people sti#*wn all over tile place and the buildings were shattered  One of the dead was Identified by Sheriff F'rank Cord as Ron .*ld J. Wing of Mankato, about ^ 35 years old  Register Lout The tourist’s camp’s i #*gi dra lion ledger was lost in the slot to, but it w us believed about 40 p»*i sons were registered at th#* place , Striking at ti 45 pm, CST, the twister swept through til#* small cabins, three miles south of Man kato. reducing most of til#rn to Umbels Twenty fix*- antonio I biles belonging to cabin residents I were hurled onto Omaha railroad j ti arks nearby.  Don #!d W old, ambulance dr.  ; ver, and brothel of Ed Wold w ho reported til#- known dead, aft# j making a trip to carry injui#*d, | said Fie hadn’t e«*n “anything I like tins since I fought til#* (mu j mans m France.** Wold, a re cent I y returned war veteran said j “people were lying everywhere. The who!#* place is wrecked i Trees were stripped down to  ¥  their trunks.”  Road Grader Tossed On Tracks A short distance from th#* tour 1st cabin, a large highwav depart J merit road grader was picked up and deposited on the C hicago. Minneapolis St. Paul and Omaha 'tracks several yards away.  An approaching fi-giht train was flagged down, coming to a stop about a block from tie- lug  pionship honors until next year.  Red Star Joe is owned by Tom Mooney of Greenville, Tex., who two years ago bought the Fay Weimai ranch where a fine strain of quarter horses Ftad been de veloped bv' Boti Weimar There were 271 quarter horses at Hie show, coming from Mis soul i, Oklahoma and Texas in numbers touch higher than anno elation officials had expected.  I here were classes from I year olds on up to aged stallions and mal es ut the bait**! classes, and tile judging and races furnished several thousand people with many thrills over three days.  Work on Now Draft Plan Liberalizing Determent Policies  WASHINGTON, Aug 17 Pi A new draft plan based on lib erali/ed d«*f#*i rnent policies is in the making. selective service of finals disclosed today < )n#* ##f them told a reporter that the largest estimates milt cat#* tile draft can produce only 155,000 men 19 29 years of age by next March 31 .“even if the bottom of the barrel is sci aped’*  Maj. Gen. Willard S Paul, di rector of personnel, has said th#* ainiv needs 185,000  Liberalized rules would make even fewer than 155.000 men available. AFiout tile only way to increase tbo number substantially would Fie to raise tile ag#* I un it alane 29 years, one selective ser-vice official said.  He added, however, that this is for tile army to decide. The war department specified a few weeks ago it wanted its men under 29, Tile law- permits the drafting of men up to 44 In ad d it ion 18 year olds must register ; F>ut are not subject to t all.  Some announcement concern mg n#*w F  deferment policies is ex pectin:! next week, one official I vehicle  said. Nothing is expected to be I Nearby, an automobile was done for some time to increase wrapped around a pole, with im* the number of men subject to [ cupants of the machine unmjui  Some of the fastest, most capable cowboys in rodeo failed to make the finals this year here.  and those others who crowded into th#* Fug money will be facing tough going against ambitious lesser I flown rodeo hands  Beaming Fe a sunshine isn’t expected to keep the folks away — not judging from (Fie way they vv*-!«* bio mg tickets on a verv lot Saturday for the Sunday i how,  Every Move fount* Today  Today > contests ar#* for the major cash prizes thousands of dollars awaiting the skill and luck that ride with the winners. Kvf\r\ toss of a I. >..p must be ar i curate, every ■steer or calf tied fast F>ut *ii11 Iv the cowboy mu*t | work fast but n< t take long chain * . un 11 preceeding timet have b#-# n #*x > ptamalic speedy It s bo# ii a leg rodeo this year and affinals Saturday were watching the ticket sales w ,?h mn * \ »* to Hie total — calculating whether there was a rFiance ta pass Cheyenne's Frontier Day* liest outdoor rodeo attendance.  Alt Of Rodeo* Best Today All of if will I)#* there this af* J ter noon all of the color and ex-< dement of rodeo at us F>est. with added features coming from the Quarter Hor ** association in th# fashion of a Int of horse racing.  Those who haven't seen the Atta rial I * #* ,e« race have a treat earning, and those who have seen them at#* enthusiastic about the  speed of the  sktXle only  is to  wrest*  i n lei* ri bv But the  pi eclat#* i*  til** South  door Ro- i#  -Painting ponies,  d jockeys  re.,I way to ap-  rome out and see i Greatest Out*  Sreonrl Day Money Winners  Cdf Roping  I Jiggs Bui k. Comanche, Ok*  ta  2 Bu  I )kla .  Spi mg 4 Zeb  1 V Tex*  2 Dorsey an I F’uzzv la < ti#-1  H Good ! md Toot  . Tex. II Col ber I.  Krone  " Schw ai  Wood  Game  Wetumka. Reid. B t  teed, i Mar ' 4 met.  Ada PM Riding  /, Wit hita Falls,  Pontotoc, Okla. r, Chanute. Ok-  F 4 Fred War for d. Aha strrr Wrestling  1 \nd Curtis, FII Reno, Chit  2 Leonard Milligan* Nash, Ok-  3-Roy Ross. Sayre Ok la 4 I! I) Hum , Coalgate, Ok!a. Steer Roping  1 Arnee G.imbhn, Wilson. Ok .a  2 Everett Shaw, Stonewall  3 Ike Rude Buffalo Okla  call as the present supply is suf-  (  ficient for months.  Til#* recalculations of manpower. based on liberalized draft rules, were ordered on the Fi«*els of protests from education and science organizations that t Ii *• proposed rules will permit th#* drafting of some of tin* "most promising” young scientists of the country.  The navy announced it needs no draftees in the immediate future.  There has been a draft "Fioli-day" for two months. The next draft is in September when about 25,000 men will Fie taken.  P51 (rashes Just In Front of Train  CONCORD. Mass, Aug 17 ( P) Ari army Pal Mustang fight cr pilot, riving formation with another P5! and a B2® bomber at the New England air show, was killed tonight before 5,000 spectators in a crash on main line tracks of the Boston A Maine railroad just ahead of tin* road’s Chicago Boston “Minute Man"  An employe of the New Haven railroad who lives nearby flag ged down tFu* train before it leached the burning wreckage I and torn road Fled.  An army statement released at nearby Bedford air base, scene of tile four day --Flow concluding • tomorrow, said the cause of the crash tied not been deter mint'd  'Hii* pilot > name was withheld P# ruling notification of next of kin.  Rocky Mountains stretch from New Mexico to tile Arctic, Fiut ifs not far ti good auto repair  iSmnett Meaders.  ed.  Simms Stopped (old by This One  OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug IT. CU Mote Simms, garrulous du ut* I or of athletics at Oklahoma City university, foi th#* first time was speechless.  He received a lettei from Charles Johnson, sports editor of the Minneapolis Star Journal and president of tile football writers association of America, saying a survey of pre.vtbox conditions revealed Ct C I -, box "is too small, women and non workers are admitted, no public addice system, poor vision and no ti ans potation after tile game”  CH ll hasnt played a game in four years and doesn't even have a press Fiox  Traffic (barge Filed on (arney  Highway Patrolman t v Killian Thursday filed charges of '% Iola hon of the rules of tn«* road nom lier one’ against Jesse Carney,  ( arnev is acct# »*d of driving a 1940 Na-di sedan I#» tFu- left si ie of the center line of State High I way 99 at a point about  1  vt mile nortFi of the i tty limits w ithout | regard to traffic on Rte highway*.  TF)** complaint against Carney was filed in the inuit of Percy Armstrong, justice of the peace ♦  Membership in "The Royal Carder ef Whale Bangers” i* open to U S N.tvv anti submarine pa trol pilots, who, in answering a I "sub sighted report, have scored  4 -Ilgg* Wolf Ma  Roswell,  Not a  Comanche Ok!a  Ada; Bob Crosby  Bm k  rcun I.  N M (tie).  Hull Riding  fadable  GRAVEL TRIT KEES IN PAV BCU JST DEMANDS  SHA WX KF!  *P F fit # n g said today ti w ink on th#*  v  i epa11 prt• ti * t 7 i «- * i * pct v  mile,  The di iv t'l day leftism from the pit of Shawnee . v  driver is J.inc erans Most #>1  Okla., Aug 17.— iaval truck driver; ey will I cf us** t# ill aw nee Lax#* road until they are pair a rd of gravel p*»s  stopped work Fri to load os drivi 18 miles southwea spokesmen for th# ies Thompson, vet the drivers, no J  being paid oui#*, ow ll Th.* «Iriviol v j*.t v is 8 a mil# F>*»n  pe  ti # ants per yard tFi*-11 own ti u# Ka cts i horn tile custom cents plus rn IO cen  TH' PESSIMIST  Mf Moll Hlaalia, Jaw  8 18 it  4  a direct hit on a whale.  I  Wheeler dropped tong enough th’ t see tf it still it used to  » durn smart, Oountry’s rn   

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