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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 18, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Of course we aren't wonting twisters like those that Saturday struck in Kansas and Minnesota, but we do have some changes we'd very much like to recommend to the state weatherman. A .Sri Jutv I'iiltl Circulation 8407 Mnnhi-t; Audit Iturcnu of ClrrtiUtlon FHE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION J.'ird 105 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, AUGUSTUS, FIVE CENTS THE COPY FINAL ADA RODEO SHOW THIS AFTERNOON Russians Lose Vote To Keep Austrians From Giving Views Conference Then Approves Soviet Suggestion Iran Be Invited to Present Views on Draft Treaty for Italy B.v LOUIS NKVIN K PARIS, Aufj. Kuropaan peace conference, tjrr.mg clown Russian objections, voted 15 to 6 today lo in- ;te Austria to present its views on the dm ft Irefity with Italy, arid then approved iiininiiiiou.sly a Soviet suggestion thnt Iran a'iso be invitc-cl. _ Cliampioned by Britain and I.......i i i i Tightening Meter Rule City to Enforce Forking Meter More Strictly 01 Use Becomei Familiar Enforcement of the. parking M regulations will be tighten- er., up a few notches when the as over and the rodeo are gone from Ada. Man- Luke H. Dodds said Salur- u. n.e'.iTS went into use Wed- iv -.day and the police fotci1 has kept husy .seeing to" things M.d so hasn't kept close eye on n, >n- pay ing parkers. However, they have ticketed q-..'.f a miniber of these, and now tiie drivers, if they (lo not report city court in three clays, be lined Later, when the driving public better understands the use of the JIT. tors, more enforcement Mill be put into clfcct. Also. Doddx says, some have bt-i'ii parking in alleys lo escape payinc 'or use of narking xpiicts (i: walking some distance. This j.i danRcruus, a real hazard lo trjijfic- in time of fire runs and cliniinaled now. Twister Damages Airport, Hangar Arthcr Airfield ot Wichita Hat Plane Destroyed, 11 Damaged WICHITA. Aug. anpliine was destroyed, 11 s were damaged and the torn the mam hang- u: ;i5 a twister struck Arthur air- at the southwest edge o( Yi'irh.ta. during a violent thun- d; vs'.orm late today Lloyd Krhard. one of the own- i nt the field, estimated damage a: and said the figure grow to of the planes were chained ti- Ihe ground, Krhard said, but force of the wind snapped the ci.aiiis, looping the planes. Three carried HOO yards. The i oof of th'- hangar was riir- Inch in the air, landing on iv.i> an planes, demolishing one, yards away. V.'ilJn-d Grimes, working in- f.dc the hangar. he felt the j.'of Rive ,-iwf.y. "I ir.ust l-.ave been blown out iho -.-fa.- door." he said, "for 1 don't remember running. I look- ed up and saw the roof sailing ove: my head. Jt was at least 40 up of Ihe damaged planes v. owned the field. A; Wilson Airfield, east of V, K-l.it.i. Dr. L. 11. Putnam es- i.ipcd injury when the light plane he was landing crashed the storm. Dr. Putnam lie was about nine feet from crciuncl when the wind drop- pvd and the right wing and v.'.-.ecl of the plane struck the pi-ounri. The ship flipped over hack. Damage to the p.arn- was estimated at 'Right in Der Fuehrer's RAC SKKIOt'S l.: NKAK OmiHICAK SV.'EDESBORO. N. J.. Aug. 17, hundred negroes and v. nite persons scuffled in a res- tvjrant tonight, and New .Jersey police were called into as- sist iocnl autiiorities as restless croups of men gathered on the streets. The groups were quiet but ap- peared lo be "waiting for some- thinc to the state police said. T.'.e disturbance started in Au- dio.; icMuurant, a state police spokesman said, after negroes entered a section of the res- no'rmally reserved for i-itc gallons. supported by the United Stales, the Austrian proposal provided that the former enemy state be invited lo explain its point of. view on the Italian treaty "on the same terms us Albania, Mexico, Cubit and All six Slav nations opposed the move, which a Russian dele- gate said was intended lo air Austria's claim to the South Ty- rol. SiiKKi-.st Miff Meet Tin- debate prompted n sugges- tion lhat the Big Four hold meet- ings outside the plenary sessions lo speed Ihp work of Ihe con- ference, which has not yet gotten down lo the task for which it was drawing of recommendations to the foreign ministers' council on the treaties for Italy, Finland and lliu Balkan Tht' conference wound up Its third week today, and impatience over delay has been manifest a- mong the smaller nalions. This morning Brooke Clnxton of Can- ada said "it might be a good thine if some of the leaders of the Big Pour could meet in order lo facil- itate more rapid work." Kiis.sla Ijones Vole Test The Russians this afternoon at organisational meetings oE the Bulgarians and Hungarians poli- tical and territorial commissions iiRnin trii-d to limit 'the right to vole in commission only to coun- tries which actually had been at wrir with former enemy stoics. France again objected, supported by Britain and the United States. Voting with Ihe Soviet Union against Iho Ausli'ian proposal were White Russia, P o 1 a n d, Chechoslovakia, the Ukraine, and Yugoslavia. Soviet Delegate Andrei Y. Vishinsky declared Ihe object of. the proposal was to bring up Austria's claim lo the South Ty- rol "which was rejected by the council of foreign He said that "if this is only a question of Ihe South Tyrol, il would soem to me the most prop- er way would be lo niise ft be- fore a commission. If the con- ference wants to invite Austria it can do it, but the Soviet dele- gation does not think it is neces- sary." Fair, Says American Hector McNeil of the British delegation asserted that failure lo hear Austria on the the Halo-Austrian, frontier would be "discrimination" by Ihe peace conference because il had estab- lished a policy of "permitting both sides lo bo heard here." II. S. State. Department Coun- sellor Benjamin V. Cohen said the American viewpoint was lhat "Austria should have the right to present her views here. It seems to us that it would take less time to hear the views of Austria than to debate: their right to be heard." Byng School Will Enroll on Friday Buses Run That Day, Classes Begin Sept. 2 ByiiR school will enroll Friday, August 30, with school lo begin the following Monday, Septem- ber 2. Supl. J, E. Tcaftuc! announces thai, the buses will make their routes on Friday for the enroll- ment. The leaching force includes Teague; Marvin Slokes, princi- pal: Nolan Wade, Bill Koller, Margaret Wood, Eslaline Waters, Zulcka Burkhart, Veneta Bran- om, Lula Wood, Ouida Stokes, Janue Sue Ward and Bertha Frank Teugue. 103 on Saturday Hottest Day at End Of Hot Week for Ada These German women are Iriughlng.flt to none other than Charlie Chaplin burlesqueing their onec-bBlovcd Adolf Hitler, The Chaplin Him, "The Grcnt was recently sprung by surprise on an audience of some 400 Berliners, who thought they were going to see "Kilty Foyie." Experiment was conducted by the information control division of American Military Government. Report Reds, British Arms on Iran Border Premier Worried Over Rumored Russian Movements In North, British Decision to Move Troops Into Basra By JOSEPH C. GOODWIN TEHRAN, Aug. official foreign source who requested anonymity said from the OP them fronUet'-i indicated the Russians had massed be- tween 15 and 25 as many as along the Araxes river boundary between Iran and Soviet Russia. This official; .who said the re- iiil ports ciime from "qualified mil- Dr. Linscneid In itin'y the Final Appeal For Help on Housing iWEATHER i t. OKLAHOMA Fair and hot souin. scattered thunderstorms and not so warm north Sunday: Mirlly cloudy, scattered, southeast. Over-1 Of) degree weather pre- vailed most of last week, reach- ing its hottest Saturday after- noon with 103 degrees. Karlier there had been one 101 and three 102 degree .readings, Friday's being just one notch under Salurday'.i, Friday night didn't help out much, either, for il marked up another of the warmish 78 de- gree minimum.1; that happened along this week. Read The News Classified Ads. Dr. A. Linscheid makes a fi- nal appeal .for aid of citizens here to help .East Central college take care of some housing .needs for students for a time, as follows: To the Householders of A.cla Ladies and Gentlemen: The housing of students is the greatest problem confronting East Central Slate college. Al- though the Federal Public Hous- ing Authority and the Veterans Administration have done and arc doing all they can do to help us, it is certain that many more, students are applying for admis- sion to this College than this In- stitution can house. Jt will have to turn away many students; some o{ them veterans. The college is crowding its dormitories full of students, just as fa i1 as is consistent; with health standards; it has made additional rooms available in its dormitor- ies.. The apartments 'built for us by the Public Housing Authority are all rented and the thirty-five apartments now under construc- tion will not be ready for oc- cupancy until November 10. Vet- erans with [nrnilies have applied for every one of them. A.ll of this acid up to the sentence, "The Col- lege ncoils rooms for three types oC 1. Rooms .in East Ada for un- married students, veterans and non-veterans, who plan to be here for the school year. These rooms should be sufficiently close to the college that occupants can get their meals in the college dining hall, unless the householder plans to bourd the roomers. 2. Apartments for the- school year for married student.1; and their families. 3. Apartments for thirty-five vctermis' families for two mon- ths, or perhaps ti little longer, who will occupy the apartments now under construction when these are completed, It should be remembered that students cannot pay high prices for rooms. In general, a month per student with two ir. a room is about all that they can pay. The College.will go forward if it, together wilh friends, can pro- vide it cannot do so, it will go backward. 1.1! you can provide any one of the three types of accommodations named ubovc, call the College Secretary, phone 3040. Very .sincerely, A. Linscheid, President LAWTON, Okla., Aug. services will be held here Monday for Rollie H. Allen, 40, prominent Lawlon grocery- man who died late yesterday. He had been critically ill for the past two weeks. troops as "typical Ked) army mountain units" and added they 'were deployed for 31! miles oust Dzhulfa, border city DO miles north of Tabriz. Tass Denies It (The official Soviet agency TUSH isaid yesterday it had been authorized to deny similar re- ports, attributed to lIuMsein Ala, Iranian a m b a s d o r to the United Slates. said ih Washington Tues- day that he had received some reports, that the Russians had concentrated troops in the cau- casus north of; Iran, but thai, his information did not indicate their purpose. He added that they might be used lo counter British pressure south, or F.gair.st Iran in to bring pressur Danish Award To Linscheid King Christian's Medal Of Liberation Received By College Head On August 9, Dr. A. Linschied, president o.E East Central, receiv- ed, the following letter.J'rpmvithe Danish Embassy at'Washington: I. hereby have the honor- and plcasuru to. inform you that on. May fifth, JIJ'IU, the anniversary ol! Iho .liberation of Denmark, Ma.iu.Hly the King hus most gni- ciotisl.y bestowed on you "Kong Christian dan Ticndes Frihcds- madnille" (King Christian X's> .VTudul of Liberation) its an ap- preciation of your contribution to Denmark's cause during thu year? ol: Naiii occupation. In forwarding the mcdi.il, should like to convey to you my hearty congratulation. Bung-Jensen, Charge d'Aflluh'S a. i. of Don- mark, With the letter came ti silver medal fashioned by the Imperial Court Jeweler at Copenhagen. Dr. Linscheid hus frequently spoken of the remarkable pros- perity Denmark had achieved the period after "she was conquered by Prussians in Jliu4 and Ihe otilbreak of World War II, her astonishing improve- ments in rural education, and her Sooner Horse Pits Ten Finalists Grand Champ Owned Now by Texan; Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association Show, Races Big 'Success In Each Rodeo Event For Big Cash Turkey in view posals for a hand and defense ol! Iho Durclanellos. (Ala said the British had brought in mut'hnniHcd Indian troops al Basra, Iraq, on the Iran- Ian border near the British-op- erated oil fields, creating a se- rious situation involving Brit- ain. Iraq and Iran.) 1 The foreign informant estim- ated the average strength oi the Red army divisions at men each with "mechanized divisions probably slightly smaller." Take Strategic Position Deployment, of the .Russian troops oast til' Dxhulfu would place them near the head of rail nnd highway lines into Azerbai- jan which Ihe Russians evacuated lust 'May. The American military attache, Col. William T. Sexton, nnd three nicies left here last week for Ta- en route to this northern frontier. They were arrested by Azerbaijan democrats in Tabriz last June and later released. Premier Ahlnnd Qavam is "greatly concerned" over the rumored Hussion troop- move- ments in the; north and the B'ril- ish decision to njove Indian troops into Basra, a highly placed diplomatic source said, a boatload of troops arrived al Basra today, Tehran newspapers reported. Allen Schools To Open September 2 Enrollment Set for That Date, Buses to Make Usual Schedules Allen public schools will open Monday, September 2, according to Supt. Loyd R. Watson. Enrollment of. both high schools and grade pupils; will be on that Monday and buses will run JIK usual that day. Wi.itson firinouncc.s thai he has a full corps ol' teachers as of to- day. This includes 20 regular in- structors and two in- structors for the Veterans Farm Training program. on crempjiry conduct .in .leaving her I JJI I L. 1.1 J J j Russia's pro- German boundary entirely unde- in direct control fined, depending on. the rectitude for her solp nf her actions Cense. Some excerpts schoid's speeches de- Crom Dr. Lin- were .printed iri national education magazines, and it. is the opinion, that, the medal, was awarded him on the basis of these speeches. Dr. Linscheid says, "I accept this medal gratei'uily as a mani- festation of Denmark's friend- ship." Mdish Schools To Open September 2 Enrollment to Be Friday, August 30, at 9 A. M.; Two New Faculty Members McLish public schools will open for class work on Sept. 2, Supt. J. R. McKueJ. announces. Flnrolirncnt will be held on Fri- duy, August 30, at a.m. Book lists will be handed out ,M that time. All students ure urged lo be present: Friday morning so that enrollment can be as com- plete as possible nnd classes be- gin promptly Monday morning. Two new-faculty members will be here this year. Alya Henry wilt tench shop and Milton Ar- nold will teach commercial work. Both departments arc expanded i this year. Good attendance last year 'made it possible to add one teacher this year, hence the ex- panded schedule. Other .Faculty members arc: Supt. .7. N. Mckccl; Ancel Sales, H. S. principal; Ethel Tuck, Mrs. Dorothy Jumar, Mrs. Aline Ory. Mrs. Alma Sales, Mrs. Helen JPearce, Mrs. Bernice Stewart. Miss Louise McLaughliri, Miss Juanita Townsend, Mrs. Jean Heard nnd Mrs. Ha Clark. Many persons attending the rodeo the last .few days found out why there is so much ado about quarter horses, that breed that has evolved from the cowpony. They found the Oklahoma Quarter Horse association show and races an interesting place to be, for both the reining, cutting and roping contests and races of the a_flernoon and the halter class judging of the mornings. They saw last year's grand champion, Chico, fail to reach the top and a two-year old stallion take grand champion honors among the a l.-ycar old o-f lhat champion win his class nnd indicate tho next year he'll be in the big competition. It was Reel Star Joe, bred and raised on the H X Ranch seven miles from Council Hill, thut was selected Grand Champion Stal- lion. A full brother won the year- ling class but won't be eligible to take a whirl at grand cham- pionship honors until, next year. Red Star Joe is owned by Tom Mooncy of Greenville, Tex., who two years ago bought the Fay Weimar ranch where a fine strain of quarter horses hud been de- veloped by Bob Weimar, There were 271 quarter horses at the coming from Mis- souri, Oklahoma and Texas in numbers much higher than asso- ciation officials had expected. There were classes from 1-year olds on up to aged stallions and mares in the halter classes, and the judging and races furnished several thousand people with many thrills over three days. Work on New Draft Plan Liberalizing Determent Policies WASHINGTON, Aug. new draft plan based on lib- eralized deferment, policies is in the making, selective service of- ficials disclosed today. One of them told a reporter that the largest estimates indi-' cate the draft can produce only men 19-29 years of age by next March 31 if the bottom of the barrel is scraped." Gen. Willard S. Paul, di- rector ol personnel, has said the army needs Liberalized rules would muke even fewer than men available. About the only way to increase the number substantial- ly would be to raise the nge limit above 29 years, one selective ser- vice 'official said. He added, however, that this is for the army to decide. The war department specified a few weeks ago it wanted its men under 29. The law permits the drafting of men up to 44. In ad- dition 18-ycnr-olds must: register but are not subject to call. Some announcement concern- ing new deferment policies is ex- pected next week, one official said. Nothing is expected to be done for some time to increase the number of men subject to call as the present supply is suf- ficient for months. The recalculations of manpow- er, based on liberalized draft, rules, were ordered on the heels of protests from education a n d science organizations lhat the proposed rules will permit the drafting of some of the "most promising" young scientists of the country. The nnvy announced it needs no draftees in the immediate fu- ture. There has been a draft "holi-- day" for two months.' The next i draft is in September when about men will be taken. Finale of Eleventh Ada Rodeo to Present In Their Contcitt, Features That Hare Won Acclaim This Year A last finule to a fast rodeo is scheduled for this after- noon al. 2 o'clock, and fans who have a good idea of what is coming up. will be there right on time. Today the competitive nngle of the grent show with its features nnd renlly dominate the program, for each event will have the ten top men remaining after four days of grueling contests. Some of the fastest, most ca- pnble cowboys in rodeo failed to make the finals this year here, nnd thosu others who crowded into the big money will be facing lough going against ambitious lesser known rodeo hands. Beaming hot sunshine isn't ex- pected to keep the folks nol judging from Ihe why they were buying tickets on n very hot Saturday for the Sunday show. Kvcry Move Today Today's contests arc for the major cash of dollars awaiting the skill and luck that ride with the winners. Evf ry toss of n loop must be curalo, every steer or calf tied fast but cowboy must work fast, bill not tnkc long chaiici-s unless Storm Hits Tourist (amp in Minnesota. Several Are Killed MANKATO, Minn., Aug. least five persons were killed and more than 50 injured tonight in n tornado lhat mo- mentarily dipped from the sky to destroy a 22-cabin tourist camp in scenic Minnesota river valley, three miles southwest of Man- kato. Deputy Sheriff Henry Schwei- ekerl of Blue Karth county said uiirly reports lo him Inclieiited the death list may total 15. The five known dead were re- ported by Ed Wold, ambulnnce driver, who made Severn) trips to the storm area to bring injured to hospitals. Wold, one of the first lo arrive lit tbu scene, said "There were people strewn all over the plncc and the buildings were shatter- ed." One of the dead was identified by Sheriff Frank Cord as TCon- ald J. Wirig of Munknlo, nbuul 35 ycai-K old. Krister LiKit The tourist's caiiip'.i registra- tion ledger wus lost in the storm, but il. was believed about 40 per- sons were registered at Iho place. linve been exceptionally speedy. It's been n big rodeo this and of ficiuls Saturday were watching the ticket snles with eye to the whether there was chance lo pass Cheyenne's Frontier best outdoor rodeo attendance. AH Of Beit To4ar All of it will be there this af- ternoon, all of the color and ex- citement of rodeo at its best, with added features comijiK from Quarter Horse association in fiishion of bit of hornt Thouc who haven't seen the quarter horses race have a treat coming, and those who have them lira enthusiastic fiboul the speed of the sprinting poniex, ridden by skilled jockeys. Striking at p.m., CST, t.he But the only real wnv to it is to come out nnd cabins, three miles south of Mim- kato. reducing most, of them lo timbers. Twenty-five automo- biles belonging to cabin residents were hurled onto Omaha railroad tracks nearby. t Donald Wold, nmburnnce dri- ver, and brother of Kd Wolrl who reported the known dead, after nuiltinK n trip to curry injured, said ho hadn't seen "anylhiiiR like this since I fought the Ger- mans in France." Wold, a re- cently returned war veteran said "people were lying everywhere. The whole Trees were place is stripped the SouthweBl's door Hodco. Greatest Out- wrecked, down to i their trunks." Road Grader Tossed On Tracks A short distance from the tour- ist cabin, a large highway depart- ment road grader wus picked up and deposited on the Chicago, Minneapolis St. Paul and Omaha tracks several yards nway. An approaching fregiht train was flngKud down, coming to n stop about a block from the big vehicle. Nearby, an automobile was wrapped around a pole, with oc- cupants of the machine uninjur- ed. OKLAHOMA PITY, Autf. Gov. Kcrr. will leave Tues- day by airplane for Minnesota to spend about ten days with his family on vacation, he said today, Greater returns for amount, in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. P51 (rashes Just In Front of Train CONCORD, Mass., Aug. army P51 Mustang fight- er pilot, flying formation with another P51 and a B29 bomber at the New England air show, was killed tonight before spec- tators in a crash on main line tracks of the Boston Maine railroad just ahead of the road's Chicago-Boston "Minute Man." An employe of the New Haven railroad who lives nearby flag- ged down the train before it reached the burning wreckage and torn roadbed. An army statement released at nearby Bedford air base, scone of the four-day show concluding tomorrow, said .the cause of the crash had not been determined. Tht: pilot's name was withheld pending notification of next-of- kin.' Second Day Money Cilf Hoping Burk, Comnnche, Ok- la. 15.3. 2-Buck Gnodspccd. Walumka. Okln., and Toots Mansfield, Bijf Springs. Tex. 17.4 4-Zttb Colbert, Ada, Jil.4. Krone Rid 1- Vic Schwnrz, Wichita Texas. 2-Dor.scy Wood Pontotoc, Okla. and Kuzzy Garner, Chanute, Ok- la. F 4-Fred Warford, Ada. Steer Wrestling 1-Andy Curtis. El Reno. Oklt, 2-Leonard Milligan, Nash, Ok- la. 3-Roy Ross, Suyrc. Okla. D. I3inns, Conlgatc, Slecr llopinr 1-Ainye Gnmblin, Wilson, Okla. 2-Kverett Shaw, Stonewall. 3-Ikc Rude, Buffalo, Okla. Burk, Comanche, Okla.; Wolf Marcum. Ada: Bob Crosby, Hoswell, N. M. Hull Ridinr Nol available. Simms Stopped Cold by This One OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. 17. Sininis, gnrrulous dir- ector of alhlelics Ht Oklahoma City university, for the first time was speechless. He received a letter from Charles Johnson, sports editor of the Minneapolis Star-Journal and president of the football writers association of America, Senls PC1 survey of pro.ssbox conditions ro- r venled O. C. U.'s box "is loo1 'I he drivers cnim the custom- small, women and non-workers V.W ls ix'nla Plus J0 are admitted, no public address! mlh: system, poor vision and no trans GRAVEL TRUCKERS IN BOOST DEMANDS SHAWNEE, Okla.. Aug. Kravcl truck drivers said loday they will refuse to work on the Shuwnce hake road repair project until they nrc paid 7 rents per of Kravel per mile. The drivers stopped work Fri- day refusing to load or drive from the pils 16 miles southwest of Shawnee. Spokesmen for the drivers is James Thompson, vet- Most of the drivers, now per portotion after the Rume." OCU hasn't played n game in four doesn't even have a press box. r-- t I Rocky Mountains stretch from New Mexico to the Arctic, but it's not far to good auto Sinnctt-'Meaders. 8-18-lt Traffic Charge Filed on Carney Highway Patrolman Cy Killian Thursday filed eharwcs of 'viola- tion of the rules of the road num- ber one' against .Jesse Carney. Carney is accused of driving a Nash sedan to the left side of the center line of State High- way 99. al a point about mile north of the city limits without regard to traffic on the highway. The against Carney was fiied in the court of Percy Armstrong, justice of the peace. Membership in "The Royal Order of Whale Bangers" is open to U. S Navy anti-submarine pa- trol pilots, who, in answering a "sub-sighted" report, have scored a direct hit on a whale. TH' PESSIMIST Mrs. Lem Wheeler dropped by home Jong enough th' other day f see if it still looked like il used lo. If we're all so durn smart, how come lh' country'! in such a mess}   

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