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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 14, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 14, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Russio insists on ploying but apparently wonts to write the rules, be the pitcher and also do the umpiring chores, and the U. S. just isn't used to playing the game in such erjicc Nc( July Paid Circulation 8407 Mrrnhrr: Audit llure.'tll   HIP rodeo grounds also had pleasure in strolling Rodeo Sights and Scenes Arena Beautiful Scene Rooms Listed Quarter Horses Rayburn Plans to Attend Bob Crosby will be here as usual; working in the arena all during the show, flashing his well known grin at the folks and chatting between times with acquaintances. Sam Rayburn of Bonham, Tex., was scheduled to come along with the Bonham delegation of Rounduppcrs and other fans. In Washington, D. C., he's speaker of the nation's house of representatives, and in north Texas he's Congressman Rayburn, but here he is primarily a rodeo fan holidaying after strenuous months of a long, hard session of congress. Bob Crosby, most famous of all rodeo cowboys, is usual. Smilin' Bob has been a fixture at the Ada Rodeo for years, help- ing along in various ways, taking part in some of the roping con- tests despite the trail of injuries that he has accumulated during decades of the rough sport. Life Magazine recently devoted sev- eral pages to an account of Crosby's experiences and to the noted cowboy-rancher's ways and altitudes. Ada Was Noisy Meters Pul Spot Year Ago To Work Here -oo- the barns inspecting the horses entered in the show. They are here from several states and from many breeders and among them the- visitor will find Quarter Horses that rank at tne very top for the breed. Jubilation Swelled to Cres- cendo as People Realized War with Japs was Over There's ti lot of history sum- med up in the front pages of The Ada News for August 14 and 15 of 1945. The streamer of Aug. 14 an- nounced "NATION IMPATIENT- LY AWAITS JAP WORD Twelve Hours After Tokyo Said Message Was on Way to U. S." Other headlines said "JAP- ANESE WEEP BEFORE EMPE- ROR'S PALACE BECAUSE EFFORTS WERE NOT ENOUGH.'" while HEAVY RAIDS SMASH JAPAN Fleets of Planes Batter Jap Wai- Industries with Tons of Bombs. But came Wednesday, Aug. 15, and a bigger type streamer an- nounced ARRANGING FOR- MAL SURRENDER Mighty Forces Roll to Victorious Halt as Japan Gives Up. As for the nation's celebration, it was summed up in "There's Never Been a Celebration Like Mayor Guy Thrash proclaimed Aug. 15 and a holiday; jubila- tion in Ada became noisy and general, many went to theii Parking Meters Offer 12 Minutes for One Cent, Hour for Nickel Parking meters are now in op- eration in downtown Ada. Work- ers began installing the meters Tuesday night and planned to finish before noon Wednesday. At noon, the meters began their'task. All persons parking at that time will have to pay. The instructions cards for the meters failed to arrive but local officials had some printed to take their place until they do get here. Henry Kimmell has been trans- ferred to the police force from the the street department to watch meters. He will .duty Quarter horses constitute a breed in which color is of little consequence. Visitors to the Oklahoma Quarter Horse association show this week will see grays, palominos, roans, blacks, about anything. But they have quarter horse 'type' and some of the less impressive looking horses will be among the fastest in the afternoon race events, ------------------OO------------------ Jeff Good of Clovis, N. M., is here for the rodeo. That he is anything but an amateur is evident in arrangements for a Good-Bob Crosby steer roping match for in September. Tickets will be on sale at downtown headquarters until 6 p. m. today and through Saturday, then they will be taken to the rodeo grounds. There are lots of general admission seats and quite a number of reserve seats that will be avail- able for the daily influx of fans. ----------oo---------- Ada people responded so well with listing of rooms for rodeo visitors th.it those in charge finally said "enough." The holds have long been fully reserved for the week. at all times that the meters arc on. The instructions on the meters read: 1 cent for 12 minutes, 5 cents for one hour. The meters will be in. operation from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. on week days. 8 a.m. until 7 p.m. on "Saturdays, and Sundays will be exempted. OPA Puts Okay On Coffee Price Boost Immediate Increase Rang- ing from 10 to 1 3 Cents A Pound Authorised WASHINGTON, Aug. today inimc- retail price increases on roffc-f, ranging from 10 to 13 cents a pound. The increase results from: 1. Cancellation of nn import subsidy of 3 cents a pound. The subsidy w a s discontinued when the price control lapsed Jjly An inrrcasr of about 2 con Is n authorized for importers June This increase hud not bi-en passed on to retail levels. 3. A further increase of about 3 cents a pound in importers ceil- ings authorized today, as an in- ducement to increased coffee im- portation. The amount of the retail in- crease will vary depending upon of distribution of coffee OPA said. churches to pray in thanksgiving and praise for the end of the con- flict. Since that year-ago date hun- dreds of men have changed from uniform into civilian clothing, laying aside the garments and ac- tivities of war for the garb and pursuits of peace, settling rapidly into the life they'd left. The observance here, centering in tonight's recognition at the i-odco program, will be brief but heartfelt that the end-of-war camc when it did without drag- ging on longer. Quietly in Japan No Show of Force, But Cavalry Puts on Parade TOKYO, Aug. Day passed quietly in Japan. There- wan no show of force. There was the usual parade. In the imperial palace sibly liie most American march- ed-on bit of ground in bevcnln cavalry regiment of the -first cavalry division, which boasts that it first entered Man- ila and Tokyo, displayed snap and precision for its commander, Brie Gen. William Chase, Lt. Gen. Robert L. Eichelber- ger dedicated a new paved runway t' Ken Boen's Aulo Stolen and Found Valuable Saddle, Boots, Radio Ado Recovered; Boys Under Arrest Patrolmen Ott Ray and Jess Brinlee of the local police de- partment reported Wednesday morning that an automobile be- longing to Ken Boen, who is known to local rodeo fans for his 'Old Gray Mare' act, was stolen Tuesday night and recovered a short time later. The car, a 1942 maroon Ford tudor, had a saddle, pair oE boots, a radio, and numerous articles of clothing. After recovering the Some of the quarter horses have sizeable pedigrees back of them. Others are just winning recognition as being qualified for rating as quartet horses. They are here frgmrnany a famous One notable exhibit is that of the Flying W T-Trvvcji n nnVi Horse Ranch of at Vernon, Tex., Duard Wilson proclaiming iti as the "Home of the Famous Stud Dan Waggoner." Oakman community church people and Homer farm women's club are serving meals in the roomy north half of the-county building on the rodeo grounds. The arena is a beautiful spot flies in the cover- ed grandstand, American flags wave from dozens of arena posts, bright new red, white and blue paint makes the chutes and other wooden facilities attractive. Hundreds of folks were out at T the stands Tuesday night enjoy- ing the cool breeze and watching block' the rodeo stock being run through the arena, with some of the cowboys making practice lariat tosses. DDT Spray Truck To Relurn Friday Will Cover Spots Misted By Drive Recently City Manager Luke Dodds ported Wednesday morning that a DDT spray truck will work Ada Friday. The fuck is being brought to cover the spots miss- ed by the drive held a few weeks ago. After they finish with the They don't all stay on. The cowboy who takes a whirl at bronc at staying aboard a "Brimmer'' steer without a saddle, is in for a rough trip. The jolting, swirling, efforts of the animals to shake off the rider make for excitement for the spectators and the winners really earn their prize money. Particularly in the Brahma rides is the percentage of toss-offs high, for the rider has only a hand-hold on a rope to help him. planned drive, the truck will upray anything they time for. The route will cover Road; South Broadway; Bulgaria Asks Greek Lands Admits Alliance with Ger- many; Ukraine, Poland Fall Inline Backing Her By WILLIAM B. KING PARIS, Aug. 14, formally presented a claim to the Paris peace conference today for the present Greek territory of Western Thrace and was support- ed by the Soviet Ukraine dele- gate. Frankly admitting a "shameful allianco" with Germany during the war, Bulgarian Foreign Min- ister Gcorgi Koulishov neverthe- less, maintained that the Bulgar- ian" army .''did not fight on any front against the an'ti-Hitlerian coalition." He asked that his na- tion be accorded the status of an allied co-belligerent, the same as that sought yesterday by Ro- mania, another refeatcd German satellite. Western Thrace is a narrow strip of territory along the north- ern coast of the Aegean sea which gives Greece a common frontier with Turkey. D. Manulisky. chief of the Uk- crew have rame delegation, charged that Kings i Greek policy was "instigated east Ada; alley school between Some, of the visiting horsemen need only a bit of space they have their cots and small trunks and that's all they require to settle down near their horses. In the Aid ridge hotel, lobby are 13 beautiful IT. i mature 'metal _ horses mounted on black bases. auto, Boon examined it and Two of them arc gold, the others found that the radio, boots and i bronze. They will go to prize saddle wore missing. He' was not I winners at the association's show sure of anything else. The sad- die was valued at the boots at an dthe radio at All of the articles have been recover- crease of lO'.i cents a pound for processors of roasted coffee, cof- fee compounds, soluble coffee soluble coffee products. OPA said that wholesalers nnd retailers, including retail wagon route- sellers, may apply their regular percentage! markups to the new, higher cost of coffee. D UR A NT, Aii rs. H. S. Connell has received word of the death of her son. Curtis Connell, 24.   a three-hour fight, game rangers yesterday brought under control a fire believed to have been started by a spark from a truck exhaust. Robert.F. Crook, 24. Cache, re- ceived minor burns and 100 acres west of Lnke Quanah park in the Wichita mountains wildlife re- fuge were burned over before the blaze .was under control. Rangers said a spark from the exhauht on a truck driven by Crook ap- parently set his load of hay afire and then spread to the'surround- ing area. abroad" and protested Britain Firm On Palestine Cabinet Determined To Keep Course Despite Tense Situation in Holy Land LONDON, Aug. British cabinet heard reports from the chiefs of the army, air force and navy of a tense situa- tion in the Holy Land today and agreed, an authoritative source said, to stick to its present course "however much the position de- teriorates." The three armed services will continue lo take "whatever mea- sures are necessary" to imple- ment the government's decision to end unauthorized entry of Jewish refugees into the 'Holy Land, the informant said. Three Killed Tuesday Three persons were killed and seven wounded at Haifa yester- day when crowds stormed at British military cordons guard- ing the port while immi- grants were taken off their ships and put aboard troop transports for shipment to detention camp on the island of Cyprus. informants disclosed that the release of Jewish agency leaders (detained after the Brit- the session. Kerr said both men's successors will bo named in general election. Sheriff, Deputies Seize 229 Pints Koiier Confisca- tion of Whiskey, Rum And Gin in Tuesday Raid Sheriff Clyde Kaiser and his deputies reported confiscation of 229 pints of tax paid whiskey, rum and gin in a raid Tuesday night. Noble The raid was Brown and the made on liquor is now in the sheriff's safe await- ing .orders for disposition. County Attorney Tom D. Mc- Keown went before County Judge L. G. Long and charged Brown with unlawful possession of intoxicating liquor. The sheriff's office made an- the November other raid Saturday but no liquor I was found at the place raided. East Central Asks Aid of Ada People to Meet Housing Needs The men's dormitory at East Central has reservations for every room with one man above the normal room load and squad rooms in the basement which are filled to capacity with twenty-five men and in addition to this there are nearly fifty applications on file from single men'who need sleeping rooms close enough to the college so that they will be acces- sible to the college dining hall. All people who live within three or four blocks of East Central could render a real service to the G. I. who is seeking to get an education by calling'the secretary's office and list- ing each room which would be available as a sleeping place for boys. The dining hall in the college can take care of the meals of these men but the capacity for caring for additional Bleeping quarters has reached its limit. Please list sleeping rooms near the college for single men. These are the men who helped to win the war. We can show our appreciation by sharing a part of our ro'om with them while they pay us a fair rental during ihe time they are at- tending college. Yours sincerely, A. LINSCHEID President against her "demands for foreign j ish swoop of June 29) was being Balkan soil." Saying he support- discussed "at cabinet level." ed Bulgarian demands for an) Their release hus been dcscrib- Aegean outlet, Manliusky said he ed by Palestine Jewish leaders as prerequisite to their own parti- cipation in talks on the Holy Land's future with Britain. One source said; "There is a good precedent for releasing the Jewish agency leaders for nego- happened lo Gandhi in India." Hitler Policy Continues Declaring that the Hitler con- spiracy to destroy European Jew- ry still survived :n eastern Eu- rope, leaders of the .world Jewish congress in Paris declared form- nlly through their London office today that the .Jewish exndus from Europe.' was "n struggle for survival by remnants x x x who have been deserted by the civi- lized world." Zionist spokesmen loudly con- demned today British measures to halt illegal immigration to Pal- estine, where conditions were re- ported critical in Ihe wake of rioting in Mai fa yestordny during which three .Jews were killed by British soldiers. Mass Bandit Hunl Halted Last Night Bank Robbers May Have Escaped Wide Search favored a return to the Bulgarian frontiers as provided in the trea- ty oE Bucharest of 1913. This would give Bulgaria Western Thrace and the present Greek harbor of Alexandroupolis (Dede Poland Swings In Line Vicenty Rzymowsky, chief Po- lish delegate, also declared Bul- garia "deserves an indulgent peace." Greece swiftly dissented. Her i chief delegate, Premier Conslan- tin Tsaldaris, accused Bulgaria of international crimes and declared the draft treaty for the country which was allied to Germany in the last two wars was "too iifiht for a country which associated herself with the German aggres- sor." Koulishex acknowledged that Bulgaria (traditional Balkan friend of Russia) had declared war on Great Britain and the United States, but asserted: "The Bulgarian army was merely used as an occupation force and not one single soldier fought against Yugoslavia or Greece." Many Fought Germans Kulishev maintained that 00.0 Bulgarian soldiers were kill- ed fighting against the Germans in Serbia, Hungary, Austria and Macedonia, a fact which, he said, had been recognized by Soviet Prime Minister Stalin in an order of the day. This, he declared, "In some measure helped to repair the damage caused by the Hitlcrinn clique which had power in Bul- garia at the beginning of the war." For this reason, Kulishev ad- ded, "the Bulgarian people .find it difficult to understand why we are described in the peace treaty as 'ex-enemies'. GOODWIN TO McALESTER WASHINGTON, Aug. 14, Capt.'John F. Goodwin, south Mass., has been nam- ed commanding officer of the naval ammunition depot at Mc- Alester, Okla. Capt. E. L. "Woodside, now in command at McAlester will be retired Sept. 1. BARTLESVILLE, Aug. 101st birthday anniver- sary of Amos and Enos Reed, twin brothers who settled in Al- ANTLERS, Okla.. Aug. hunt for two bandits be- lieved hiding in the Kiamichi mountains after robbing the First National banks of Walters, Okla of nearly has been aban- doncd. i State Highway Patrol Chief J. M. Thaxton said the mass search was halted last night and all highway patrolmen except those regularly stationed in the area were withdrawn. He added that the FBI and slate bureau of investigation would keep checking devclop- Fast Action, Thrills Await First Nighters Monster Parade of noon Announces That Eleventh Ada Rodeo It Under Way No one can know for sure un- til tonight, but if the opening pro- grain of the Ada Rodeo packs the stands and bleachers with a 000 capacity crowd few would be surprised. The eleventh annual show swept into an impressive start Wednesday afternoon with a monster parade, with hundreds of riders and horses come from every direction, some from as far as Dallas. Tex. Thousands of people lined Mairt street to see the procession as it wended its colorful way through downtown Ada and so formally let the world know that the Ada Rodeo is under way. Many Cowboys Here CoXvboys, veterans of the arena nnd some who are just now breaking into the rodeo game, moved into Ada in force Wednes- day, many with their trained mounts, all of them ready to go after the big prize money that may go above irt all. Visitors streamed into Ada, too. and most of them early sought outHhc headquarters and tickets for one, two or more perform- ances. Each yo.ir more of the dyed-in- the-wool fans come for the entire five days of the rodeo. Fastest Show Vet Tonight's performance finds the arena nnd stands in the best condition they have ever been in arrangement, bright col- ors, everyone lo bo where the events can be seen plainly. The Grand Entry tonight is ex- pected to set-a new mark for number of riders. The show it- self features the best cowboy competition, new feature acts that make the and more exciting than in the past. So it's all out for the the greatest outdoor show of the midwest and southwest a fast program under the lights in the coolness of the open air. Brisfow Man Says He Was Held Up Tells Police Tall Man With Hat Pulled Down Took Hit Money Gene Peacock of Bristow re- ported lo police that a tall man with his hat pulled over his eyes held him up at the corner of Ren- nie and Thirteenth and made him give up his billfold. The tall man took and returned the bill- fold to Peacock. Police are look- ing for the culprit. Police report one> arrest for Tuesday. A disturbance com- plaint was filed against a man at a loral cafe. The single arrest failed to keep things from pop- ping around police headquarters. however. A 1934 Chevrolet pick-up, driven by Elmer Fulton, Ada, collided with a 1939 Chevrolet sedan, driven by Bob Williams of Fitx.hugh, at the intersection of Cherry and Fimrleemh. No char- ges were filed. Hugh J. Adams, Logan county attorney for more than eight years, has announced he will submit his resignation to county commissioners, effective Sept. 1. He will return to private law practice here. At the suggestion a Republican, the com- missioners approved the appoint- ment of Charles Allen. Jr.. a Democrat, to serve as assistant county attorney until Adams' resignation becomes effective. ments. The search started after the 'robbery last Thursday and gain- ed ever-increasing momentum as men believed 'to be the bandits were sighted from the south- western to the northeastern bor- ders of the stale. Tin; last report of the bandit pair came Monday from a farm wife near Antlers who reported a man, believed to be one of them, appeared at her home in TH' PESSIMIST IIr linl. Jr. 1 -rr vui_ju, UL J It I JJLtJJJtr lit len county, Kansas, in the pio- search of food and fled after fail- neer era, was celebrated here by ing to wrest a sack of potaties from her. a reunion of 50 of their descend- ants. It was the 60th successive year the anniversary has beer. I noted. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Adi News Want Ads, It's unfortunate, but a lot o' folks spend too much time stoopin' fer dollars an' too little time kneelin' fer God. Hot summer days wouldn't be so bad if it wuzn't fer th' fellers who smell like they needed a ncvr wash job.   

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