Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 11, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 11, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             When a feller goes into 'most any kind of of f ice now and the attendant finally says to him that "we'll get to you" in a few minutes, he is entitled to wonder just which way she means it. A i a K f Sri .1 uI v Ion 8407 Mrmbrr: Audi! Hun-.iu lit C'lri'ulullim PHE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION -13rd !t'J ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 11, 1946 FIVK CENTS THE COPY Ada Rodeo Ago in Is Ready With Sparkling Show, Fast Cowboy Competition, New Features And Quarter Horse Show and Racing Quarter Horses To Furnish Additional Thrills This Year Finest of Three States To Compete in Judging, Work- ing, Sprints Hero Si.iiiflhini' new h.-is been mlilrd to the Acln lioden- I Horse assot'ia- 1 r.ll Jiliaiif.e I It J.lluw Anrl what n ami what n i llnee upon ol Die finest quarter hor- m Oklahoma. Missouri in I'fimpetatinn with a M'U.'ini: clirniix us part of Sun- j (Jay ift'-rnnnn's final rudeo pro- with two stale champions' j.-it-ins eiit-li AM ioveis of horses will re- vi-i in the rhant'e to see ;uid in- nnd v.-ati-h in net ion those rcpresenlalives of ii The Program WIT.DNF.SDAY, Aug. 1 p.m., Jill Quarter Jlorscs must be on the grounds; p.m., Rodeo Parade: I! p.m., Rodeo. THURSDAY, Aug. Qunrlor Horse judging; p.m., Quarter Horse working cohlests and races; fl p.m., Rodeo, KIUDAY, Aug. Quarter Horse judging; p.m., Quarter Horse working conlcst.s and races; II p.m., Uoclco. SATUKDAY, Aug. a.m., Quarter Horse consignment sale; p.m., Quarter Horse working contests and races; !J p.m., Rodeo. SUNDAY, Aug. p.m., Hodeo and rnces. Binns to Picture Rodeo Undertaking Size, Ada's Part There's a lot more to a rodeo than seeing that the animals II. P. BINNS. Mnnagrr great breed of horses thai, has :'.s origin in the cow country nnd in the last few years icallv come into its own. has Hodeo officials make it plain that the sheriff's force, assisted leave the chutes on time and that the winners among the contesting I cowboys are paid off promptly i and the folks in the stands given a good show. j Take the Ada It bus grown so rapidly from a small start and now has be- come such a big affair, requiring so much attention to so many angles before and during the show that few people have much idea of the -amount of work and time it fill takes. Members of the Ada Kiwanis .club will have a chance at their Monday meeting to be 'brought up to date' on what modern ro- deo management requires, 11. D. Bimis, popular manager of the Ada rodeo and high rank- ing cowboy in rodeo circles, will be the principal speaker. Ho is scheduled lo ruvcul some- thing of the vast amount of work that starts months before Rodeo Week, of the Ihousands of dol- lars that have to be paid out be- fore the gates open for the first show, of where the money goes, of tlu! constant search for the best feature nets to make the show itself a faster, more thrill- ing entertainment. Representatives of various Adn Opens With Giant Parade Wednesday; Five Great Shows Everything Pointing to Rec- ord-Smashing Attendance And Exciting Events It's just around the corner now, that Ada Rodeo, and every- thing points to it being the larg- est held in n years of rodeo his- tory may even achieve next to top attendance ranking for outdoor rodeos 'all over.' The rodeo itself is Ihe chief nUruction wilh its ridirig, roping, bulldog- ging contests, Hodeo officials after weeks of Oil and Gas Prospects In County Wells Well Near Orphans Home Flows Oil, Test Just North Of City in Gas Sand Oil news o! the past week turns attention here to the noi'th, to prospects lor o gns well fit the north edge of the city nnd a sec- ond oil producer near .the Bap- tist Orphans Home six miles to the north. The McDonald and Snndcrs No. 1 Ben Starrott et al, mile west of the center oJ! 28-4-6, had set casing at feet in the top of a gas sand. The well is on the west side of the highway lust north of Ada. Drexel Sales No. 1 Parker, SW SE NE of 33-5-B, across the high-. way from the recently completed Orphans Home well, is reported cleaning out and flowing oil. The Home owns 130 acres north of the Parker well and nit of the royalty on that acreage. E. P. Laminar, Salina, Kansas, who drilled the well on the orphan- age land, is drilling the Sales well, also. hard work, say that, all's ready wilrlril to go forward into the five days w ror of entertainment that will outdo l SBtNF; the t'rcnl shows of other years. j1 wildcat west of Area Hotels Filled Francis, topped the'Hunlon at ainn thu SyJvnn Shalc attendance outlook is that almost every hotel within 100 miles of i.v state will cooperate to groups an: being invited by the i i-i- a "no open-gambling" linn j Kiv.'anis club In bo guests a'nd to l.'ie Wnailer Horse K I are; -ijnin with Hie Kiwnnians in gul- j ling better understanding of the 1 fiction, Ada Kodco background, its deal- leinmg. roping, cut- ings and also in win it ways Ada the .short-ilis- people and pitch in and given ......the show managers a 'lift1. Guard Enlistment Still Slow Here Office Open Daily With Information for Young Men Who Are Interested Kniislment in the National Guard is still going slow, but the office in the front part of the Vr'W hall is being kept open on regular schedule to enable veter- ans and non-veterans to join. dipt. Robert V. Barrett in then (la.Mies fur which tin hoist--, an- increasingly .T.l'U.V Ami Sulurdiiv nidtiiing at !i o'- fortv head Oklahoma'.-; li'.jaiter Ifuise studious and Mi.se., from some of held.-, in Uii; .'.late will I'e sold. T.'n.'if.Jiiy and Friday mornings ociock there will be Quarter HO.'M- judging- -with the fine I'lxnts nf the line animals being ci'rnptiird by the judges. Tfiiii-sdiiy. Friday and Saturday ftrrnoon.s at p. in. the CJuar- will ically put on a M.IIW with theic "winking" cuii- Miii races. I'rice for tulmis- .'iM! tn thc-.'.e .shows is in llud.Ilg tax. Judging JIICIKIIIK Classes Kobert V. bnrrctt I'lasM-s in the judging division i the new headquarters of tut- show are: Aged stallions, I buttery. Enlistment started Aug. old stallions, H-year old when "R" Day was declared j-tallifns. yearling stallions, stal- throughout the Unilcd Slates.. EARL McKENDREE, Secretary Ada has been reserved for the five clays. Local hotels got reser- vation requests as carlv as Jan- uary, and have had all rooms 'tajtun' for several months. Most hotels over the state have signs telling travelers to avoid Ada on the week of Aug. 12-18 as all available rooms will, be occu- pied by rodeo funs and perform- ers, Never before has the public- been so ex- plain that the signs are :a cour- tesy to help guests avoid incon- venience. Exciting: Feature There' arc exciting changes in Lite feature part of the program this year. Chester Byars, great- est trick roper of them nil, is lead and will be missed. But Ken Bowen and the Old Srny Mare act: will be there, the clowns will be at their funniest, trick riders will be risking life and limb. And the mule riding act prom- ses to be a sensation. Three cow- aoys tire assigned to each fiery ittle Spanish mule, nnd at the signal must snub the animal, and below feet in van. A couple of setbacks have been reported for the county; the Blackwell Oil and Gas company No. 1 Smith, SE SW NW of 29- 4-8, near Stcedman, was drilled to feet, in Cromwell sand, rind was dry; a well drilled by V, L, Crowell find others in NW NE NE of 8-5-6 was also dry in the Cromwell.' Two locations are the W. A. Delaney Jr., No. 1 JPayton in the NE' SE NW of east of Steedman, and the Anchor No. 2 Balthrop, NE NW SW of 15-4-6, north of Ada. Texas Co-Completes Gasser Texas Oil has completed a well in 18-4-5, north of Center, plug- ging back from to 081 feet and completing as a foot gasser, Norbla No. 1 Pnnnell, in 27-5-4, west extension the Bebee-field, acidized Viola lime from to feet, was reported clean- ing out and making about 15 bar- rels a day. C. L. Carlock js drilling in NW SW SE of 31-5-4, six miles west of Italian Premier In Protest Of Proposed Terms Of Peace STEER WRESTLING: Just about the most rugged of the tough contests to be seen hero during the Ada Rodeo Aug. 14-18. It's thrilling enough for a man to leave his running horse, then he has lo bring the steer to a halt, wrestle the animal down in prescribed) fashion. Some of the fastest bull- doggers in the country will be after the big money night after night while the thousands in the stands watch with excited delight. Bryant Dies Of Gun Wound Man Wounded Friday Morning by Negro Police- man Lives Four Hours Bullets from the gun of Dave Albert, negro policeman, fatally injured .Homer Bryant and a charge ot murder has been filed The official announcement WHS against the policeman. The case not made in time for local veter- Is Victory Day Brief But Heartfelt Recog- nition to Be Given at Ada Rodeo Thursday Night August 14, has been officially designated as "Victory Day" representing the anniver- sary of that year-ago day when the Japanese emperor ordered his forces to cease resistance. saddlc mount the rider and selection champions; "yea: old mares, yearling mares ilu' i.llv grand and re-1 uf ,.L.. All National Guard personnel, other than general officers, re- marcs. old mares, ccive on day's base pay for each authorized drill attended after the unit has received federal rec- ognition. Kales of pay are the same as those provided for the regular army by the Pay Adjustment Act of as amended. Current base pay rates arc as follows: First or Master Serge- ant, Tehchnical Sergeant, Staff Sergeant or Techni- cian Grade 3; Sergeant or Technician Grade 4, Cor- Technician Grade 5, serve And mare and foal, produce of EC I of sire and exhibitors' Working, flaring Classes The aftc-Mimm cumpt'tition will be a delight for the spectators. Light are entered in 2-year old 10 in toping, five in the contest, then follows a c-iiir.r.c contest 'open lu the v. ......_ Th-.-n c-i.n.e the raees, In j W.dO; Private iv.ii tin- heart of any'.spin-Is fan Private, Deal faster. Fur all field (raining, pcrson- the I )k laliiuna 2-year; nel will receive base and longe- fuliiiitv with II entries; Hie vil.y pay and authorized allowan- yard 2-year olds open wilh 7 ces provided for their grade. cnt: the yards all ages1--------------fc------------- 7 i-nliu-s; the '.WO yards open i CATTLE SALES HEAVY v.'.th G and the all-Palomino race rnnrc-A half of the beauti- TbLS.A' Okla., Aug. 10, fi.! blnnris f-nten-d. Tr.r. v.-hole slmw is a kind of 1'iiil; meet with Vt.fiOU in Ih.- iind w ,11, I "1ontl'' :t ''cvwilecl eiiliniK! when the Ok- vaids tc> .-.n! it nut with the Texas c Quaiti-r llnrse during trie Sunday afternoon rodeu per- fc-i :i.ant-c. ,iet him across the finish Jine- md these mules have never be- fore been ridden. will be six mules and 18 men in swirling action at the same time. A contest, for cutting out an- imals will be a feature this year replacing or.o of the older acts. This will show the uninitiated July sales of cattle at the Tulsa I slock yards totaled head, than double Hint, of the iWEATHER today. Sales of calves hogs :t, 125 and sheep Feasibility of night airmail was demonstrated by a night and day relay of flights from coast to coast begun Feb. 22, 1021, witii the trip being completed in hours time. and 21 minutes ol: elapsed Oklahoma Fair Sunday nnd Monday: little cooler Sunday Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Largest fresh water vessels south centra] and extreme south'- I afloat sail Great Lakes. For tliuhtly warmer in pan- smooth-sailing motoring, see Sin- Int-U-Mcadcrs. 8-11-11 what remarkable teamwork be- tween horse and rider can do in selecting and 'cutting' one ani- mal from a milling group. Because of popular demand, the Kiowa Indians will be back, with additional features for their colorful act. I'ararte To Be Dig Array And there's the parade Wed- nesday a f t e r n o o any- where from horses up. The Grand Opening night may have to mounts, with riding clubs from all over Oklahoma and North Texas talc- 'ng part. .The huge nrray o'f horses has posed a sixenblc problem for of- ficials in taking cure ol! all ol! the horses and the visiting riders. Ticket sales arc booming right along, but it takes a lot of "people to fill seats, so. many tickets arc left. As many as 90 reserve tickets have been pur- chased by one firm. All Animals Fresh Stock Race Riot Flares In Alabama Town Mobt Form Quickly After Fiit Fight, Many Negroes Are Injured ATHENS, Ala., Aug. A fist fight between two white war veterans and a negro touch- ed off rneo rioting in which be- tween 50 and 100, negroes were estimated to have been injured, some of them knocked down and trampled, here today. witr be heard by Percy Arm- strong, .justice of peace. The case is ..scheduled for 10 a. m. Tuesday. Witnesses include Harry Jessie Peters, Carrathers and Theodore Albert lold Police Chief Quin- nns" organisations to make exten- sive plans for observing the oc- casion, but a simple, effective rec- ognition of the anniversary has been worked out in cooperation with officials of the Ada Rodeo. After the Grand Entry at the rodeo Thursday night, before Ihe U-tLt he Bryant in j action starts in'.rodeo competition, sell defense because he didn't gilas Freeman, himself an ex- know whether or not Bryant was carrying a weapon. A second shot had to be fired to stop Bryant as he advanced to- ward the policeman. The incident occurred about 1.1 o'clock Friday morning in negro town and Bryant died at n local hospital about four hours later after his condition had been re- ported fair, tor a lime. Bryant had been arrested num- erous 'limes by both city and county officers. He entered a pica of not guiUy to a murder charge filed against him in 1039, but changed the plea to guilty after the char.ge was reduced to manslaughter in the first degree. Rosenau said old and crippled ne- groes were among many he saw knocked down and trampled by white mobs, estimated to have reached a total ot men at one time. "I expect at least 50 to .100 ne- groes were Rosonau re- ported. "The negroes were chas- ed off! Ihe streets by Ihe .mobs." He added that about 10 white men had been arrested. The judge said a semblance of order was restored about night- fall after law enforcement offi- cers from all over northern1 Ala- bama poured into this agricul- tural center, of some popu- lation. A local state guard com- pany was mobilized to help keep the peace. All. stores and' moving picture places closed at 6 p.m. white participants in Still Hot, Still Drought in Area It's been distressingly hot and it's a drought and no one knows when the rains will come. And until they do there's little com- His record shows that he was fort in the old remark that "jt's arrested once in Portland, Ore- I bound to rain some gori; in April of this year he was Friday contributed a 106-dc- Counly Court Judge D. L. i 'He WHS sentenced to 15 years in the state penitentiary, but was given a parole Dec. 24, 1942, nt- tcr serving a portion of three years of the term. serviceman, will step to the mi- crophone and deliver minule find n half: comment on the ui sion nnd tribute lo the nation's war dead. A gun salute will fol- low. Also, the American Legion post and the V.ITW are considering go- ing in together and preparing a float for the big parade of Wed- nesday, a float that will suitably observe the day. arrested by city police and charg- ed "with carrying a pistol. DISCIPLES OF CHRIST IN PLANS FOB UNITY MOVE O., Aug. International Convention of the Disciples of Christ in- structed its executive committee today to prepare plans looking toward unity with the congrega- tional Christian church and the Baptist church. The committee was directed to meet with representatives of the two other, denominations and up a plan of unity for sub- gree reading and Saturday closed superheated a milder 94-degree maximum. The sum- mer's thus-far high of 107 was recorded earlier in the week. WAR VETERAN KILLED IN TRUCK TURNOVER HOUSTON, Mo., Aug. Walter Collins, World War II veteran from Jasper, Ark., was killed and four others injured today when a truck bound from Jefferson City, Mo., ______ __ ___......_............. to Jasper overturned near here, left her baby in a physician's of- China Peace Hopes Fade Even Gen. Marshall and Dr. Stuart Find No Path Despite Negotiations NANKING, Aug. 10, general peace for China, appears impossible, even though all the Chinese desire it America's two top envoys to this divided nation announced today in :i gloomy and unprecedented statement. General Marshall, special presi- dential emissary, and Dr. John Leighton Stuart, new U. ,S. am- bassador. issued their stalemenl to correspondents against a back- ground of Hprcacling warfare be- tween Chinese communists and government troops and at a mo- ment when U. S. marines were battling train wreckers in north China. Despite this open pessimism, some observers here expressed belief that General Marshall would try one hist fling al. peace by appealing fur a coalition gov- ernment before abandoning his patient eight-month effort. Seems Convinced II. was generally believed, how- ever, thai Marshall already was convinced there no path lo peace through negotia- tions on the present though he has been negotiating all along with Generalissimo iaiiK Kai-Shek, head of the government, and with (Jen. Chou communist plenipoten- (Speculalion about an appeal for a coalition government there- (Continucd on Page Column 1) The injured were Raymond and Claud Collins, both Luigs Mother Is Torn Over Baby's Fale Wants Babe Born in Doc- tor's Office, Fears She Cannot Take Care of It DETROIT, Aug. slender, 29-year-old woman, who Mayor R. H. Richardson, Jr., aid he later freed the two white ion after members of the mob romised to Disciples of Christ claim approximtely Jean Pruitt, both of Jefferson City. Ages of the victims were not immediately available. returns for amount invested. Ada News Want The Nesvs Classified Ads. Plans for 38 Housing Units For Vets on Kerr Land Okayed fice 15 minutes after birth, today balanced a little girl's future against the persistent lug al her molher's heart. A policewoman in suburban Dearborn said Ford wants her feels it Mrs. Madeline child back but have "a better Talk Heard In Cold Silence Soyi Toe Much fe Fulfill; Molotov Wolki Out On Greek Delegate's Speech By JOSKIMI nVNAN PAK1S. Aug. 10. premier struck out al the propos- ed Italian peace treaty tod.ty ns "punitive" and beyond ills coun- try's caparitv In fulfill, and urR- L'd the peace conference to post- pone for a year settlement of tho Trieste and other frontier prob- lems. Tin; decision to Trieste, Premier Alcide Do. peri said, was "a bite into our very flesh." Pleading Italy's cause before an afternoon session which re- ceived his arguments in cold silence, DL> Gaspcri protested the deep slash in Italy's armaments, the bills for reparations, and the changes in the Italian frontier, particularly the Big Four deris- ion on Trieste and Venezia Giu- lia. He buttressed his request for a delay by reference to Italian, claims for damage against Ger- many, asking: "is this not anoth- er proof that no settlement in Kuropi: can be alt.lined before peace is made with Uyrncs Shakes llnntl There was no or oth- er demonstration by the confer- ence after De Gasperi's 41 -minute speech, but as he walked back up the center aisle U. S. Secretary of State Byrnes leaned out and shook hands with hini. The conference adjourned un- til Monday with a decision to de- fer discussions on the Italian plea until then. It also look no action after a morning's debate on ad- mission of Albania as a member. Soviet Foreign- Minister V. M. Molotov fijjHin walked from the room while the Greek delegate was .speaking, and the Yugoslav delegate charged that it was the policy of Ciiccce, bitter opponent of Albania, "to foment and start war in the Balkans.1' De Gasperi described the "French line" proposed as the frontier between Italy and Yugo- slavia as u "line of political ex- pediency" which left Ita- lians in Yugoslavia and Slavs on Italian soil. Offered To Accept 1919 Line lie recalled that he had offer- Jed to relinquish the natural frontier on the Alps and to fall back on the line traced by Presi- dent Wilson in He added Hint Italy approved with certain I rescrvationH the Ethnic line es- tablished by an allied committee of experts last spring. "But the Yugoslav delegates in- sisted, with ui gumonls still bas- ed on the idea of punishment, for total possession of Vcnena he said. The premier described the pro- posed free slate of Trieste as a mixture of Slav elements within a predominantly Italian popula- tion. lie asserted that the city's in- ternal labor and political strug- gles would prove "most serious" for the United Nations if the al- lies persisted in their intention to enclose opposing factions "with- in the fragile cage of an inter- national statute, with meager ra- tions and abundant polilical rights." Only Bill For New Trouble Declaring that altogether 000 Kalians are lo be severed' from their country by the con- templated border alterations, he asked the conference: "whal good will come of clinging to a solu- tion which only bids for n e w De Gaspcri branded as unfair jeopardizing the defense of Italian independence the treaty's economic- and military clauses. He said Italy had contributed its fleet, its manpower and shed blood for three years on the al- On Friday of last week finals plans for construction of 38 Vet- erans Emergency .Housing units were approved by the federal Rend The News Classified Ads. anils' used in1 the rodeo in will be new nl the game. How- ever, so that they can become ac- customed to artificial lighting, rodeo stock will be turned into the' arena several times-before the opening performance. Eugene F. Plauche, safety rep- resentative of the U.'S. Fidelity nnd Guaranty company, has ex- amined the new steel stands.and pronounced them not only entire- ly stout and safe but the most complete of the kind he has over seen, These 12-high stands have added room for many more spec- tators August. This is the culmination sev- eral months of effort by the City of Ada and the Veterans of Fore- ign Wars to ease the housing situ- ation for veterans in Ada. rThe buildings will be situated on the Kerr Estate which earlier residents know as the ".Kerr Or- which was developed years ago by W. S. Kerr, father of Gov. Robert. S. Kerr. It is a 10-acre tract one block west of Oak Avenue and between Twentieth and Twenty-first streets. the veterans have the use of the land Gov. Kerr and his brother Aubrey Kerr, A.da, replied, "We'll be glad to do anything we can to help the veterans got 11 place lo live." task now and is making good progress toward the goal. Hi.-lccl.ion On Nccil Eligibility of the veterans who will live In the apartments will bo based on several factors such Kcrrs Glad to Help When approached about letting Al one lime city was in as families living apart because clanger of losing the units because p.l: lack of. funds to use in prepar- ing a site on which the govern- ment could erect the six apart- ment buildings. The VFW put its membership work helping on this phase. The city's cost t.in preparing the site is estimated nt and after a government contribution of about the VFW will have to raise the veteran is living in Ada and cannot get a place for his family to be with him; cases where three or four families are living togeth- er in one house; families of vet- erans .woh were killed in War JJ and are in need of housing. Plans for the laying of neces- sary water and sewer lines, side- walks and other needful facili- ties to fit the apartments out for comfortable Jiving conditions have been submitted and approv- chance" if it is offered fur adop- tion without ever seeing its mother. "She whal she did." Mrs. Nellii Hitchcock uf the Dear- born police said after talking with Mrs. Ford in the hitter's cramped trailer home. "She'd ilikc to have the baby back but j she's afraid she couldn't lake care I of it." i Mrs. Ford wept quietly, Mrs. 1-Jitcheock said, as she told of her struggle to support three oilier children on her scant, earnings as n waitress in n Dearborn grill. The woman is divorced from her husband, the policewoman said, and does not know where he is. The dark-haired mother enter- ed the anteroom of Dr. H. L. Eil- enfeklt Thursday night, said only Hint she "wanted to see the doc- and patiently waited her lurn while 20 other patients pre- ceded her. Five minutes after entering the physician's office she gave birth to n five pound, five ounce girl. Mrs. Ford slipped out 15 min- (Cimtinucd on Page f) Column 1) TH' PESSIMIST i f eci' anci tlle ]ocal sponsors of the i ules laler, leaving Ihe baby in The has been working for j move hope lo have the units go- j Ihe office, according to Dr. Kilen- three weeks on thai fund-raising j ing up soon. LIIU tJJ Ifeldt. Hull Housewives ought t1 spend more time makin' a happy home an' less time tryin' figure out some other wom- an's age. One o' lh' hardest things in In' world is t' fumble fer th' check longer than th' other feller without auDcarin' is>   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication