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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 7, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 7, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Ltt't hove the government forget the Townsend plan and help parents of school children by furnishing each child four pairs of shoes per year and allowing a sum for school starting A% trait NK July Paid t'lrcul.illutl 8407 Mrmbfr: Audit Uurrail of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 96 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Orders Coming In, Tickets Are Going Oul Rodeo Looming Now Jutt Week Away; Roundup Tript Start Thursday Out-of-town fans' jiro planning to auc-nd the Ada RocU'O, AUK. M-38, which is Wednesday, Thursday. Friday, Saturday and Sunday of next week. Rodeo of- ficials report that several hun- dred tickets arc being sent out through the mail each day. Quarter horses from at least MX states are expected to enter the Quarter Horse Show here in r-onnection with the Ada Rodeo this year. The quarter horses will rare each afternoon of the rodeo with cash prices being offered winners. Roundupper.i Practice Members of the Ada Round- Up club are doing considerable practicing these days as prepara- tion is made for the coming out- door event. Cash prizes beinR offered to winners are the incentive for rodeo contestants from all sec- tions of the nation and the best in the nation to come to Ada for the eleventh annual showing. In every event, cowboys will be matching their skill" and strength against that of other contestants and the one who has luck and skill comes out in front. It is not unusual for a cowboy, who is good, to win close to 000 per year. Ken Bowen Returns There will bo additional con- tract performers hero this year. Returning will be Ken Bowen his Old Gray Mare act, which made such a big hit with spectators last year. The Ada Round-Up club starts a series of four booster trips Thursday. The trips will cover this entire section of the state. Accompanying the boosters will be a number of Ada High school band members. Harold Graham will be along to do the directing. State Whipping Up Its Heirens Case Youth Recnocti Slaying of Thret FARMER A RECOVERED: The freighter, American Farmer, is shown adrift in the Atlantic alter the vessel collided with another American freighter, about BOO miles off the coast of England recently A British sea captain charged that an American boarding party or- dered his men off the crippled freighter after the British had salvaged the ship, struck the British ensign, hosted an American flag, and made off with the ships, reported to be a salvage N 11.A. Ivadio-1 ID Axlell Takes Nomination In Missouri (NEA Several Changes In Public School Teacher Personnel There will be several changes in the teaching personnel of the Ada public schools for the fall term beginning in September, ac- cording to Supt. Rex O. Morrison. Gasoline Price Advance Here Reflects Boost at Refineries Gasoline prices in Ada jumped I crease was too much and there- These changes include: Howard Rice, principal from one to two cents per gallon last .week; the amount of jump apparently depended on the loca- tion of the service station. Service station operators on East Main were contacted and I reported they had decided to in- CHICAGO. Aug. The state moved today to wrap up its case against William Heirens by obtaining an indictment charging the 17-year old possessor of a dual personality with the murder of Mrs. Josephine Ross, one of the three killings he confessed. In unfoldine a detailed story of his incredible criminal career yesterday, he set forth how he knifed Mrs. Ross, it 43-year-old widow., in her apartmeiU'in June of 1945. although he had not been indicted for this murder. His confession solved the fiendish kidnaping. strangling and dismemberment of Suzanne Degnan, 6, on Jan. 7. and the shooting and stabbing of Miss Frances Brown, 33, a former WAVE, on Dec. 10. 1945. Within less than an hour after Wilbert Crowley, first assistant suite's attorney, announced wit- nesses would go before the grand jury, the jurors were reported to have named Heirens in a true bill formally accusing him of murdering Mrs. Ross. Crowley said testimony in- cluded that from police officials and Mrs. Mary Jane Blanchard, 21. one of Mrs. Ross' two daugh- ters. In his statement Heirens said he killed the woman but could not remember inflicting, the 11 knife wounds or covering the largest wound, in the neck, with adhesive tape. The dark-visaged university student, calmly and without hes- itation, for more than 14 hours yesterday related and roenacied in full details of the three brutal killings. Law enforcement offi- cials expressed amazement at the matter-of-fact relation of the crimes by the mild mannered University of Chicago sopho- more. Glenwood grade school, who has accepted a position at East Cen- tral State college with the Veter- ans Administration. Nicey Vickers, who was acting principal during the five years Mr. Rice was in army service, be- comes principal of Glenwood. Mrs. Lena Adair has resigned as Ada high school librarian. The place will be filled by Miss Jane Cupps, graduate of East Central college and for three years a stu- dent assistant in the college li- brary. Loyal "Sharkey" Nelson, -Ada junior high physical education di- rector, has resigned to become basketball coach at Shawnee high school. Paul Landrilh, who has been at Glenwood grade school, tiikes Nelson's place at Junior high. at' crease the price of ethyl gasoline from 20 to 22 cents per gallon. Stations located in the east half fore added one cent to the prices. So far, there has been no city- wide increase in the price of oil. The increase in the price of gasoline to the public was brought about not by the op'er- Trumon's Choice Ousts Slaughter, Faces Battle With Republican Now ST. LOUTS, Aug. ,7,  'eady to function. The United Nations has made a beginning to- ward assuming UNRRA's respon- sibilities but little more. Charges Filed On Driver of Truck Slamons Accused; C. A. Acker to Hospital After Truck Hit His Car Paul Slarnans was charged with reckless driving Tuesday by Highway Patrolman Cy Kiilian. _ He involved in. an accident Several new officers are at- that sent C. A. Acker to a local tending the meeting this year to; hospital where his condition is learn the functions of the organi- xation, as those new officers will be taking various offices in Jan- uary. The meetings are held as in- struction periods for all officers and such meetings are mended by the FBI. The convention will end Wed- nesday afternoon following a barbecue at the W. A. (Gus) De- laney Lazy D Ranch. A similar program was he.ld last year at Sheep Creek. Temperature Up To 105 Tuesday reported good. A complaint filed in 'the Percy Armstrong justice of peac ecourt stated that Slamans- was driving a 1939 Ford truck from an un-. known- point to a point on Main street of Stonewall where the accident occurred. Slamans is alleged to have been driving in a "reckless, imprudent and unsafe manner." He was further alleged to have operated the truck at a speed greater, than would enable the operator to stop within the assured clear dis- tance ahead. Bystanders who saw the acci- dent report that Mr. Acker was turning into the traffic when his automobile was struck by the Slamans truck. Acker was thrown from his car Tuesday the mercury in Ada th? skvrocketnrf nnst. and struck the paving. skyrocketed past Ihe 'century mark for the first time in some j days. The thermometer failed to slop when it reached 100, climb- ed five more degrees to 105 be- fore finally giving out. The re- flected heat from the downtown sidewalks made it seem more like 110. Pulling up the covers was in order early Wednesday even if the previous day had been the hottest this month. The temper- ature took a 30 degree drop to 75 degrees making it at least seem cool to Ada townspeople, after sweltering heat during the firsl part of the night., Newport Arch in Lincoln and Balkcrne Gate in Colchester are England's only two remaining Roman gates. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Ne-.v All-Time KANSAS CITY, Aug. A new all-time high price for cattle on the Kansas City market was paid yesterday for three car- loads of choice grainfed steers which brought a hundred pounds. The previous high was established July 29. Yesterday's price compared with a World War 1 peak of in December.. 1918. The OPA ceiling which expired June 30, was. WEATHER and hot to- night and Thursday; high tem- peratures Thursday 100-105. Kilgore, Sweeney To Battle Again West Virginia Has Same 'Finalists' for Senator As Six Years Ago CHARLESTON, w. Va., Aug. sen- atorial contest between CIO- backed Incumbent Harley M. Kilgore, Democrat, and Republi- can Thomas B. Sweeney, 43- year old former state senator, was forecast today on the basis of .apparently easy triumphs 'in the primary balloting. Kilgore and Sweeney opposed each other six years ago. With returns counted from of the state's precincts, Kilgore's unofficial total was 885 to for his opponent, J. Buhl Shahan of Eikins, former state purchasing director. Sweeney, a Wheeling insur- ance executive, held, a lead of votes to over his op- ponent, Mayor Claude R. Hill of Oak Hill, in returns from precincts. West Virginia's five Demo- cratic and one Republican cong- ressman were far in front, with more than half of the precincts in their' respective districts tab- ulated' in unofficial 'returns. Rep.'E. H. Hedrick, Democrat, sixth, and Rep. Hubert S. Ellis, Republican fourth, ran without primary opposition. the democratic nomination for U. S. Senator Frank P. congressman, today issued a Macon newspaper editor running I statement in which'he expressed Two representatives of a Now England concern were here Tues- day find'signified 1hoir willing- with the blessing of the president, appreciation of his superiors, but I ness to bring the plant, to Ada if and national democratic Chair-; did not mention the election res-] they can get such a building by man Robert E. Hannegan, over- whelmed his nearest opponent, B. Marvin Casteel St. Joseph. Briggs, who was appointed to Truman's old senate seat in Jan- uary, .1945. piled up votes in 3865 of 4528 precincts while Casteel got and Robert I. Young of St. Joseph The republican senatorial pri- mary also was one-sided with James P. Kem. Kansas City at- torney, overwhelming his four opaonents. In 3617 of 4528 precincts, Kem had to for his closest competitor, William Mc- Kiniey Thomas, St. Louis shoe factory employe. ults which gave Enos Axtell the nomination on the basis of un- official returns. "Yesterday's primary was but the opening skirmish in a battle that must be fought out within the democratic party to wrest control from non democratic he said. "Jf the party is to succeed in this fa.'i'o congression- al election and if we are to elect a democratic president in 1948, the alliance existing between the ClO-political action committee and the democratic national com- mittee must be speedily dissolv- "So far as I'm concerned, I feel milting simple majority "recom- mendations." The Netherlands and Australia spearheaded the fif-hl against the Russian posi- tion. The rules committee was to convene today to complete final details of procedure. No plenary session was .scheduled. Acceptance Assured The compromise on voting pro- cedure. as well as other rules sp- proved by the committee, must UVL-, several OkJnhoma j I00 ratified by the full cities. They do not want to I Plenary session, but acceptance a place larger than 25.000. ls since nil 21 nations If you know of any building )n .thf rules committee. that 'might be arranged to suit1 f of thu two-day their needs, call or see Mr. Mar- i ca'T'e ,at. lodav Sept. j. They will expect to erect or have creeled a building for the plant for n permanent home. The looked small go to New over Engenders have j Except for Slaughter, all the i have discharged my oath' oC of- remaining 12 incumbent con- jjce to the best of my ability. 1 gressmen won apparent renomi- nation. TASS TO MAKE GOOD ON SEC. BYRNES' CHALLENGE MOSCOW, Aug. said today it would deliver to So- viet newspapers and radio sta- tions in its next news cycle the full texts of speeches, by U. S. Secretary of State Byrnes and Russian Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov onr peace conference voting procedure. (Byrnes challenged Molotov in Paris yesterday to see that his statement replying to the Rus- sian's -attack of Monday was pub- lished in the press of the Soviet Union. Molotov said "we accept the am more than grateful to my sup- porters who expressed their be- lief in me on yesterday." ALL-SERVICE NET MEETS FORT SILL, Oklahoma, Aug. 7. Fourth .army tennis players from installations in five slates will start play in an all- service tournament here tomor- row. Entries have been received from Oklahoma, Texas, Arkan- sas, Louisiana and New Mexico. rejl Axtell Feels That Truman Is Pleased KANSAS CITY. Aug. Enos Axlell, winner of the bitter fifth district race for the Demo- cratic nomination for congress- man on the basis of unofficial ro- tfcrns, said today he felt thai President: Truman would be grat- ified at Ihe outcome. Axtell said he had received no word from the president, who en- dorsed Axtell in his effort to de- feat Rep. Roger C. Slaughter. _ Commenting on the election result, he said he didn't expect to churcb see sxich a turnout "especially in i after the tired, irritable delegates 1 finally ran out of arguments and voted on a series of four amend- ments and sub-amendments. The committee earlier reject- ed 11 to 0 a New Zcabnd amend- ment which would have estab- lished n simple majority as the form for all conference decis- ions. The bitter debate not only a set-back for the smnll powers, which had fought stubbornly for a simple majority on all matters, but also was a solid victory for the western powers over Soviet Russia and HIP eastern European nations. the south part: of the city. William Higgins. eight i than J time winner of the Fort Sill sing, les crown and Edward C. Jones, headquarters company, Third corps, Camp Polk, La., are pre-tourney singles favorites. t ,tha I "We got a few more out there he added. In 18G7, when Alaska was pur- chased the Coast Guard cutler "Lincoln" was the first U. S. ship in Alaskan wat.ors. CAMBRIDGE, England, Aug. 7. Four Americans have amed to the international inference's new commis- sion on international affairs. John Foster Dulles, of New York, was chosen vice-chairman of the commission, which was es- tablished yesterday as a means of making the protcstant and eastern orthodox churches a force in world affairs. POETIC LARCENY RACINE, Wis., Aug. 7, Burglars who broke into the Eighteenth street cash market found only 39 cents in the cash box. .They took the money and left a note in the register, which read: "Roses are red, violets are blue. "We didn't get no "Nuts to, you." Bituminous coal produced about kilowatt hours of electricity in power to lift the cubic .feet of water in Lake Superior .11 feet n Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST I. Hlnnk., Jr. PRESIDENT AND' DAUGHTER VOTE: "'If SlnuRhler is right, I am wrong." sniil Pnw. Truman, re- ferring to the 5th district congressional race in which he hopes to purge Rep. Kugrr Slaughter in fa- vor of Enos Axtell. Here daughter Margnret casts her first vote with her father in Democratic prj- mai'ips ;i1: TnrlpnpnHr.m'p maries at Independence, T Please don't rest your weight on our we've got too much weight up thcr' already. Kvi-n Hi' fi-lli.'i- who looks forward, .xnmclimo.i I u r n s nround .'in' looks hackwnrd these' hot nummer nfler- noonj.   

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