Ada Evening News, August 6, 1946

Ada Evening News

August 06, 1946

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Issue date: Tuesday, August 6, 1946

Pages available: 16

Previous edition: Monday, August 5, 1946

Next edition: Wednesday, August 7, 1946

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Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - August 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma —- b‘  .....  ^    '---*    »*» °'d at>Ut "»  .....-*    —    I*    -    A-    Ut    -    •—    w.        Monday    o.rtoin.y    ap    a    (.,,.    (o,    .    more A \eraff Nm iu!v raid Circulation 8407 Mf mn*-! \udit Bureau of Circulation 45rd Year—No. 95THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION ADA. OKLAHOMA. TUESDAY, AUGUST 6. IMC City Council Holds Second Regular Meet Discussions Range From Paving to Group Not Wonting to Be Token Into City rTt!6 d^co£d regular meeting ( the City Council was probably tr.e slowest of any previous meeting? tho:e was little action taken on si:} particular projects; how-c •• a number were discussed. Highlighting the meeting was a report by Acting City Manager Luke P> Dodds, who gave a res-Ur Y- °* .tbe various departments ‘ * he cite. ( ounoilmen commented that the report sounded better than expected. A paving project was discussed and ci= ti n is likely to be taken r* a meeting Thursday night or at fir. *thei meeting of the city group. Avenue Width Established The width of Francis avenue --on- -'Ism to the alley between Foul .ee nth and fifteenth was oiswussed and it was voted bv the ■un cl I men that the street should be rota nod as TO fort wide and ; ■* BO f * 4 ( tv ( Ie: k Ray Martin asked ie, tie v. ore y for some city employees hut the request Ie finitely by the Guam Hero Keeps His Promise More Shirts, Shorts For Shelves Soon Forecast Follows OPA Boost in Betoil Ceilings; Consumers Orgoniiotions Urged By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITH j WASHINGTON. Aug 6. CP—| A spokesman for retail clothing! merchants said wistfully today that higher textile prices may put $2.25 shirts and 79-cent shorts back on store shelves. “That’s our hope,” said Louis Rothschild, executive director of the national association of retail clothiers. He told a reporter that the average 16 percent increase FI VK CENTS THE COPY Rules Committee of Peace Conference Now in Tangle May Vacation Being Probed Reported to Hove Spent Time in Miomi With Gorsson Brothers «s:ris*»•»a* Spending, Release Materials M3y LGdVG By EUGENE B. DODSON By JACK BEEL WASHINGTON. Aug. 6. Senate w a r investigators sn id today to be pun, lung CP' — were WASHINGTON. Aug. 6 - PP) The government’s $1,600,000,000 public works program ground to a virtual halt today. Federal agencies under presidential edict set about choosing .'>(00.000.000 worth of construction in I that Rep. May cd in Miami (D-Ky) vacation - a tip to defer at Last uni ii spring cotton textile ceilings put into effect by OPA yesterday “undoubtedly will encourage greater production'' of cotton apparel. ‘‘Manufacturers will have an incentive to produce shirts to re- j mittee said the group has receiv- __    ,    Colling    the    step rn Miami Beach, Fla., with “comply with the president’s on trials of the Garsson mum- nnti-inflation budget’’ 1044* combine in March 01* April sion Director John R I re - f . .,    ..    yesterday clamped on a three An official of the Mead com- way moratorium that: tail at $2.25 and shorts at 79|cd information" indicating that letting'events anv agency fiom haven t had*1' —'L ---- 5WelLhd... K^!“cky. 1#.?'maker ™.ay construe.™ ounnq me next 56 blea c was coun- ...ny rad Inman George Tweed, who for nearly three years the "hind’s' ?uUs°n ™ ■Wl"'<' ,i'^n* ,ikc « hunted ai any of those long time.” Should Appear Soon in A group < -key be left o~p does ji * city i r it as parsed \ The pet pl persons asked that in the country. The t v, ant tn come into r an ordinance that >nut a month ago. reported that the f ’•> >es n t have additional bene*iis to offer. Mayor Frank Spence: E>ki*d that they make a - trier investigation, but the group wanted a prompt replv :r, the council. Tax Levy Is Obstacle ne entire situation was sum-p by one person who said that the property owners are v on :ed about the extra taxes tnat would be levied their Ti rued against It is a good city, but we like he country better,'* the speaker ■ or the croup said. A problem involving the park irs escaped . .    ,    ~      animal    in * ,    ,    ■    Promised to send an automobile to Antonio Astern one of the heroic natives who befriended him lie n-icntlv kept tile two-year-old promise. At left, above, Tweed stand1 on V-‘V beut°'iant (*>- 8j* and 11 S. Arner. of General Motors,’ stand on a San b rancisco dock, watching a new Chevrolet ad- sh.TSn Escaped Convict Is Shot and Captured William Mitchell, Wewoka, Token by Posse Near Atwood; Walked Away from Subprison July 25, Hid In Hilly Region a' have been at the | hotel in Miami Beach at s o m e period during that time with Murray and Henry Garsson The two brothers were gin ling lights of tin* Batavia and Uric Basin Metal Products companies and express permis- Up to now, Rotschild added, manufacturers have not been able to make a profit on these lower-priced items. He said they should begin tol other firms in the combine, re-appear in stores in about 301 Congress was in days.    April    I    to 12. 1944. OPA said the 16 percent textile Hi a speech to the house last increase will boost cotton cloth- July 8. May denied specifically mg pi ices six to eight percent and * hat he had received any travel jump the cost of household linens I expenses from the Cumberland Lumber company, an affiliate of contracts for any new may construction during the next Versailles days without his sum: J Provides that either civilian production Administrator John D. Small or Housing Expediter V\ ilson \\. Wyatt must recommend. and the reconversion di-rector approve, non - deferrable recess from federal construction to be started between Oct. I, 1946 and April I 1947. and 3. Requires the on the deferred list at least $700,-000,000 worth of construction, some of which may I** eliminated entirely. Military. Farm First Ari official familiar with th** moratorium plans told a reporter th** search for deferrable projects most likely will turn first to such „    .    military construction as ware ti aiy o houses and officers* clubs, some imports, and certain agricultural conservation and reclamation iii projects. .Another official predicted that careful study also will he given to flood control projects and to public highways. These officials emphasized however, that no specific propjets lo bi* postponed have yet been chosen. They pointed out that agencies hair more than three j nooks t*» review their program and submit revised estimates to Step I man Awarded Contracts Stand The reconversion director made it clear that th** moratorium does Yugoslavia Serves Notice Won't Be Bound by Less Than Two-Thirds Majority Votes By LYNN lit INZ! REING PARIS. Aug 6    . i* , ' rules committee of peace conference adj* tangle over procedure today and a British said the possibility raised that the enti blo** might leave the conference The committee bogged dew th#* Pans lined in a questions i pok es min had been Kus .nam ove t: e quest; *>r tv. * *uld he pm\ c matt* i conference A dinner re* upon wl simpli vote >\ ** lr, AV I n Yi mu] atte an i ii s m of third-rrrtmi be for* da via ut Ie* whet he major e i to th* * J n< I tw d; ATWOOD. Aug. 6.—(AP)—William Mitchell. 44 an es-'i Cf Oklah ‘ma Transportation caPC“d convict from Wewoka, was shot and captured by a ->e> et the corner of Main    nnssp    in    rncrctorf    bill    4~__1____a a t •    .    .' _    corner    of Main and Herm ie st the side door of the .-arris hotel was discussed, but no action was taken. Officials of Ire company* will be invited to toe next regular meeting of the city council at which time the em will be discussed fur- posse in rugged hill country near here today, Lieut. Arch Merriott of the state highway patrol reported. —    ............ —# Merriott p: obi mer. Hawkins Assisted In Capture Of Plan Now, Sign Up Mitchell Tuesday For One or All Of Booster Trips said was serving ten Mitchell, years for who rob* about 17 percent. Rothschild, however, expressed belief the OPA clothing price estimate is “on the conservative side.” While OPA was boosting textile prices to meet requirements of the new price control law. the agency's consumer advisory committee railed for caution in lifting ceilings from basic commodities. especially food. The committee urged government agencies, including the new price decontrol board, to take a “strong stand” against “premature” elimination of controls. Mant Local Organizations This advise topped a five-point anti-mflation program the committee offered yesterday. Other I recommendations: I. Creation of a the combine, adding that “I never used one penny of anybody's money except my ow n as travel expense or otherwise.” Nevertheless, the committee was understood to be preparing to Question May — when his health permits him to appear— about the reasons for and the expenses of the reported Florida trip at a period when war department witnesses have testified the house military committee chairman was exerting “special pressure” in behalf of the Garsson companies. ( ommittee records indicate that Mav also will be asked to explain his letters of April 12 and May 12, 194a to Gen Dwight D. Eisenhower concerning court igencies to put • (Continued on Page 2 Column 6) Oak Ridge Quiet on First Atom Bomb Explosion Anniversary n r*n Ru A But ted Yug* mg t!:** and her leave the succeed two-thirds vote. Bv rnes Vs. Molotov I wo st* Mon.. moi nine and tor noon, proved to be rough g . with 0 James F os I av ;.t s actu possibility t Slav satellites * conference un Irs. ii in getting a rule Underweight Hogs Crowd Markets As Feed Costs Soar Birthplace of Bomb About Half os Large, Changing Into Average American Town S. Sec-By rites : gn Minister V. hief antagonists, i Russia of at- * t* f A f p. 0    £    A    VI    *    f.    IP    * berv with fWarme    —    i    *'    .UI    a    strong    con-    partial    proceedings against Capt ,r    cour'!sumcrs    organization    “on    a    local.    *[°soph    Herman Garsson. In his CHICAGO. Aug. dollar corn and state and national basis” as'ari April 12 letter, May ‘indispensable part of the foun- Murray Garsson. the tv. walked away from the sub Pl Fro rn311 h*e n' ° fi lit?1"    .    I    parlor    the    foun-    *VlI‘1 ‘,v garsson. the captains this mmninff m *♦ 1 ap|,uie | ^a^lon .for effective government ^a^*lor. as “one of my warm perth^ moi nine. Merriott added, action in controlling inflation.” I sonal friends” mA"*’    2*.    Coordination    of    the    anti-in- flation fight by President Tru ! til,n : ne .dans v 4eo g lo biles h ne: SO-p;g th th. come for all •in do so to don some b. get into their auto-s " od go Booster-trippmg * * **** Ada and the Aria of Aug 14 IR **f! hoiy of the Roundup • Cill mg today on down • : • !.merits to line up \h »steis tiut they \mI1 u. ,** to see many civic > wh > may be available. if you can furnish a car ■ to go. see Mrs. .Tulia na ti an, at the Harris r call her at No. 170(1 so - un be listed for one or mi sa a *. iff s t booster trip is sot for August 8, and goes to Iphur. Davis. Wynnewood. Pauls Valley, Maysville, L.nasay, Chickasha, Blanchard. o: man. recumseh. Shawnee. Seminole and Konawa. i he second is Friday swinging : M Henryetta and around Lome M nr: v the trippers make a swing to Tishomingo, Ardmore. Duncan and back and on Tues-dav Durant, north Texas, Antlers Highway Patrolman Harvey Hawkins assisted in the capture of Willie Mitchell, who was captured early Tuesday near Calvin. T lie local trooper received a radio message Monday and complied with an order to help in th** extensive search for the escaped convict, who was serving IO years for robbery with fire-ai ms in Coal county. Raymond Rains, former chief of police here and now deputy warden at McAlester penitentiary, was in Ada Tuesday morning attending the sheriffs and peace officers convention. He said that lie had heard that Mitchell had been captured, but had received no official information from his office at that time. Rams stated that Mitchell walked away from the subprison at Stringtown July 25, and had been the object of a search since. Ada police kept in close contact with tic* search by radio conversations between McAlester morning, Mitchell had remained in moan tainous regions of Hughes, Coal and Pittsburg counties, existing on food taken from isolated farm homes. Farm Wife Gave Alarm Merriott said search for the morning j escaped convict centered in this I area after Mrs. John Yeager, a farm wife, reported Mitchell appeared at her farm home late yesterday and asked for food. Bloodhounds, highway patrolmen, sheriff’s deputies and guards from the* penitentiary were brought into tin* hunt. Bloodhounds picked up Mitchell s trail and followed it over two mountains until darkness halted the search. At dawn, possemen, who had camped at the end of the night trail, spotted smoke. Found Cooking Breakfast They surrounded the area from which the smoke came and closed in and found Mitchell near a small fire cooking breakfast. Merriott said the* convict grabbed a rifle he had stolen and started to run. Possemen opened fire and Mitchell halted. Two bullets The court martial found Cap   .... am Garsson guilty of refusing    i * should “take imme-1to obev an order in the field but to set UD advienrv I r**c°mmended clemency, a recommendation that Eisenhower cepted. man. who diate steps to set up advisory committees to represent the consume! view in all agencies charged with administrating the present (price control) aet. 3. Strengthened OPA enforcement of all price ceilings. 4. Speedy adoption of administrative policies “which will guarantee that commodities will be recontrolled when prices g i v e evidence of becoming inflation ary. The committee described this as the “minimum program* re quired to make the new price law work despite its “several major inadequacies.” Ada Was Hoi But Most of Stale Was Holler on Monday Bv EDGAR THOMPSON OAK RIDGE. Term . Aug. 6 — I (.1*1    The atomic age was a year i.    -T*    K°    today    and in this historic 6. d    -I u    o city    where    it was born the birth- possibiiitv of day passed virtual Iv unnoticed .    a«6    ma    ceding renewal later this There was no celeb: at on plan- described mu,nth,wcre se,on tod*y n5 respon- ned to observe the first anniver-sible for maiKeting of under- sary of the atomic bombing of weight hogs. Uncertainties over Hiroshima. Instead scientists future prices also were stripping j who a year ago were awaiting reffed lots of cattle, some of which ports on th** havoc wrought on were not being fed to fullest the Japanese city today are seek mg    ways    of transforming the D< pile ttic fact that hogs and awesome forces into peaceful ure ••attle are bringing around the for mankind. best prices in history, livestock    One by-product of the    cha in- observers said it wasn’t    profit-    reacting uranium    ovens    that able to put extra weight    on the    helped develop the    atomic bomb animals bv giving them    a corn    already has been diet. Corn is too precious a medic commodity.    disea*. Processors are bidding around This was an infinitesimally • 5—08 a bushel for old crop corn small unit of radioactive deliverable within IO days. The stance know n as Cai twin 14 former OPA ceiling was $1.46’ Bids for new crop corn harvested, are much $1.36 for shipment before Decein ber 15. One farmer sent 400 head of underweight hogs into the Chi- ac- ndI highway patrol headquarters ! struck him but the wounds were at Coalgate and hv.,.-.. Its Urn and boosting at the same tune. Mrs Smith says. She a so nas been informed that Den-t B-k Line * will furnish a bus * * an i that will go along to with the music. Negro Succumbs To Injuries in Fall Fell from Bridge, Loy Two Days Until Found minor, the patrol lieutenant add cd. Mitchell was returned to the penitentiary. g*e Mickey Owen Back From Mexican Loop Key BROWNSVILLE. Tex, Aug. 6. Owen. forme r ^ catcher who jumped to Mexican league, is in Browns-ing customs, Marco!Iv having driven ie corder from Mexico City Estimate Made On Vets for County VA Expects 4,899 of Them From War ll to Be In County by June I, 1947 Mosier Tiros fop Legion Moot Now Ada Out of Tournament, Tulsa and Altus to Decide Other Finals Entrant OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. 6. —Oklahoma City Mosier Tires    i *    .    - ,    --    ---- beat as the lath an K bestock market yesterday ican Legion state baseball tournament draws to a close tonight with a doubleheader scheduled. Hi t Ii e double elimination tournament finale, Tulsa Siegfried Insurers and the defend ins# i ,* V    sow*."now The sun took over quite defiVwahShTxirV? .fSIV tlashin< than^f.umal'1''* ' A^large* rn Ta 7 clouds andP showed had Things I lhL‘'ha"'P'°n.sh,p tilt ’ P‘ m‘ m packer agri'<*d- but added the sd their way for a while in early and-take af fait rotary of Stall and Soviet Fe M. Molotov the Byrnes accu tempting to dir once through the council of four leading foreign ministers, and Molotov I* plied that *r.** Big Four was an American idea. H<* accepted Byrnes’ challenges to have the American's remarks published in Russian newspapers' amid charges and c<ranter-charges of incon sistency. B; rn* s. replying to the Russian’s chi copious chal lent the Un marks were published viet Union .Molotov repeated h of inconsistent v. H * s. was speaking “in a <*• angry tone * and dec! almost alone, have to    tk agreed derisions’* of numstei ■ of the f fr< *n d M •d St n i o n s * ’ 'The R ar. •gate in th d B re for it* ased v ar to on P* md ti Rn > Unit* i State .area defer he foi pi- in rn. F: s ii t> Call- cd a “Radioisotope.“ or    ,*    ray not yet    emitting    form of stable    carbon ower at    Carbon    14 wa eat mai I •• * at oll    into til** t au es sible cure of cancel As for the town if **l dwindled in population I for trui p it hi He accepted By rn* to h. ive th** secret . rema P ess as published rn 'th Th* ■ exchange took pl; secon d week of argil W hell ':«*! flu* Comm It ti rf* om mi ■rid a * uh* that a Si nit itv or two third \(»t** will he required f of state ii e Russian ft the team    to    beat    as    the* 18th"an*    lf81’ li'<***u<K market yesterday,    wartime peak of about 75.000 nual    American    Legion    h“:    the ar'J’Jl‘u^ ^partment report-    persons to 43.000 Thee ar. ed. Although he had corn, and about 32.000 work* ; could have used it to add weight The arni’, maintains it: * * *»n t s *.! t*» the hogs, he preferred to s -ll    "f the 59.000 acre reservation but both corn and lings at present    there are many indications that prices,    Oak Ridge is taking shape the agriculture department av**: age American town said conference * > pats treatv ri mend a: >n« < a to the f rn in r-1 rs council of four I rial action, t haileages ^Iolotov’s Acrurift •reign lr £> in nation morning. The temperature got up to 98 degrees, a hot any time here. The undefeated Tires can take “alarmin* the pennant by stopping their alarmin£ opponent rn the last game. Hovv- ........ «yer’    .    tbe    Tires lose, a second during the afternoon. "* Ho we've r’i £mei    t>U' tuo teams vvi11 some relief came dutina the ear- Th t Wednesday night. Iv hours with a drop to 72 de n ° 7'^ Serded N°. 2 in the grees.    P l° de‘| meet, fought their way to the Lightning during the night in- TuU i    a 7 4 yK’to,'v over dirated clouds and perhaps some Mn ", m2ngS ,aSt ni«ht rain some distance south of AHaL.3    A    * Altus won its Jus from Purcell was not in terms meat supplies. considered of future Drop Pail Week In (rude Oil Output ae A tm R. L. (bant. a negro, died at a local hospital at 5 a m. Tuesday; he had received treatment for the past four days after being found in a semi-conscious state last Sa turd av. I he negro was suffering from shock and    exposure,    cerebral concussion and fracture of the Muskogee regional office of the left leg. which had maggots in ’ '    ‘    ' th** wound when he was found. Highway    patrolmen    reported _____  v,i    an    uui- that Grant apparently fell from cr wars in the county a year from to    a bridge near    the Ahloso    “Y” and now, bringing the county's    cst- bv    that 1— ----- - 4 '    ’    ***    1    ..... There will be 4.899 World War II veterans in Pontotoc county by June 30, 1947, according to survey released this week by the ca:    me    baseball    star    was    at    a    couple    of days later t    .'n' ,.»! ^K*'d c“sto"« <’f- The troopers* reports show that G    * '*ef0 h s thereabouts Grant struck some concrete un- M    derneath    the V Thea"urveymd?sdose!T?hat there H^esV^amfair V w,!l be 1.259 veterans of all oth- which “ded “l.fo mille I' Lowest temperature early Tuesday was 63 at Boise Citv south of Ada I    riIll,s    -w°n ,!s ,os~ TULSA. Okla. Aug 6 .R and those clouds may have help    p o ’    v    kame from Purcell    Ui    ude oil    production    averaged coo the breeze that cleared the “in th**    i    i    *    4,892.000 barrels daily in the heat out here well before sun- the aftom^ e • kames in week ending August 3. a decline rise    Ait...    r    n    s,esiion yesterday,    of    38,450    bands the    Oil    and The Associated Press reports I    Bcl erlv ^^H    Jh.i pl’^n City    Gas Journal repented todav from over the state indicate that    a Vo ii    while Purcell sent Ada cot by pretty well Monflav I 14 JO    W    *'    10    lnnin*    »••'*>> for the temperatures over most Ot the state ranged above the century mark. Highest reading was at Alva Posf-War (rime Here, Lions Told D. A. Bryce, special agent tailed arrived late yesterday. Ef-la?t night to contact him he was not found until a I mated total veteran population’to T    IT wi    ^ll>*    ,    agent    rn -    6.158.    1    puiauon    to    Ada    people    driving to the Falls (f r^ '!f the Oklahoma City of- Basis for the Veterans Admin-lm Baptist Encampment near , fe4 of ,the Federal Bureau of Inration estimate are f i c » v o c    to    ko through muddy A!?atold members of the stietches on Highway 12 between Add, L!ons club todav. “Don't Roff and Scullin where the bmk there will be a post-war vested Read Ada N et urns for amount in- ews Want Ads. bridge where he was found. Tho distance from the bridge to the place he fell measured 12 feet. Sheriff Clyde Kaiser and Trooper Cv Killian filed a report on the incident Tuesday morn-! state bv next June is set at 276.- Veterans of other wars mg. WEATHER Picker Man Killed Oklahoma ght and Generally fair IO MI.\M I. Okla., Aug. 6    (/P)    A retired Picker, Okla.. zinc mill operator. Marion Francis Shoemaker, 69, died of injuries in a hospital here after a truck in SM ajSS1"    s^ng    overturned P.    UWeane.W -feJr"-, supplied by Selective Service to- VA*serccnirha. office    !.),ack‘°D K ^    ^1    *1^    ZZ    For ton, D. C.    **    leuor^lnk of the highway sur-1 flrst time history the 17- The estimated number of World a<rT-; r n #    /    !    *'(dds b‘ad    ad other age War II veterans in the on tho    too. for a time alongl grJVpSrln er,m° °76    route,    but did not come far ,, h?deial officer and nation- 337. Veterans of other”' war's enou*h to_ ^a^h Ada.    aIiV famf>^ pistol numbering 74.917 will bung the STATE ROAD COMMISSION state s estimated total veteran RECEIVES $1,600 UUU population to 351.254 “    *    -    OKLAHOMA    CITY Aue 6 PHILADFIPI,;i/n5r>* r    highway comni.v rii IL, ADOLPH I A. Aug. 6.-<hP)    sion    received $1,600,000    from the aHelnhhf r V lliebt for Phl1-    first    apportionment    of    the adelphia firemen.    ont    ficch.i voat. ni«Mht jla/ms beUv;een mid-    tax    commission night and five ami. kept them    terdav. Altogether, the tax c«i omission i , .    -    expert also spoke bi lefly of sonic* activities during the war while stationed at El Paso. during w hich time, he declared, he gained a knowledge of Mexico and admiration for the Mexican people and leaders. Texas accounted for most of the week’s decline by dropping 31.300 barrels to 2,196,250. Kansas was down 6.300 to 264.150; Okla-homa off 2,550 to 381.100; the Rocky Mountain area of Colorado. Montana and Wyoming was off 850 to 169.200. ! ^California_ output increased 4.-(50 to 877,500: eastern area up 350 to 61.950; Illinois gamed 200 to 210.000; Arkansas added 50 to 78.950; Louisiana up 800 to 392 -300; and New’ Mexico gamed 2 -700 to 100,850. Three Arrests On j Monday by Police Peace Officers Of Sfafe Meet Here Two-Doy Convention Expected to Hove More Then 200 Officers in Attendance Members of the Oklahoma Sheriff and Peace Officei ; association started gathering in Ada tuesday morning for Riy annual summer meeting of th** organi zat ion. Registration started at 9 a rn and meetings \wn- scheduled to start cully in the afternoon with more than 200 officer from va;-lous cities over th** state **\i>* «* ted to attend. Accompanying th** officers to the Ada affair were members of the F BI. who are stationed in O k I a h o rn a and surrounding states. D. A (Jelly) Bryce. FBI agent in charge of Oklahoma, will be one of the principal speakers on the program. Those attending th** affair will be entertained tonight (Tuesday) at a dance rn the bail room of the Aldridge hotel. The men will be in conference most of the day Wednesday and the conference w ill be concluded with a barbecue at the Lazy D ranch. T tov t**rd Ai J ti i ta ti enc* , w I UP *f in* -ti a ecu f f\f* c d ii bv F Min pr OI L Mackenzie King of that the foreign minister meet concurrently with for enc® t- > speed the v. peace treaties for Bv* count: :« ' Interrupting debate in committee or two- rh rds r . “In th** a Lee pres repre en ta tack again ed rn th** long** him mg Staten: ii., ri. .. Byrnes rti&g a .ter W. Car. acla beat the riL ne Bv Unite ss. Th I • n b h n pul s I -t ti Admire. Respect Soviet Petiole “VV hen th** S.*v . • I. , i ;*^ A t<» th#* wall, the Unit piormsed aid an i v>. -• SUI Continued on lh TH' PESSIMIST H# r.b ti lank*. hopping and discovery that sec en out of the eight were false Isierlf were"blamed*    Prank"    j    j^3^venue    ^    —    •    ? p * s-the Oklahoma announced yes- apportioned $10,229,527    :    e    gen Bread Costs More Now OKLAHOMA CITV. Aug 6 - (/Pi Bread was one cent a loaf I higher in Oklahoma today The Stat** Bakers Association announced the increase is in a* col dance v uh the new reding set I la.>t week bv the OPA Police officers made three ar rests Monday, the first of the Week. Two persons who were ai rested f*>: disturbance each posted I o appearance bonds to appear in court Wednesday One person signed a $20 stay bond. No accidents or other misdemeanors were reported although taere was a false murder alarm that had th** police on their t«»«• 7 for a shore while Monday night ♦ Better returns for amount in I vested. Ada News Want Ads. Aug in fie gain v a th: 6 V i idinj but ti.* ound up he did I PHILADELPHIA Philadelphian ti "qui/, hid" t: md it ; cops know him nm Paul Rid**!. 5 too ride la ? night and the p dice station i week. when hi* overwhelmed officers with questions as they sought to learn his identity for nearly 20 hours. Sergeant Car on Bv id didn t bother with questions this time, lust called Paul gramimothi* Mi • Helen Flow (•ad got hun. c .ai.** pa ri*.* a *1 ti undi •ii around ilium ;

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