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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 5, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 5, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             It appears that President Truman has about as much trouble working with the millions of dollars involved in the federal budget as housewives have trying to make hubby's salary pay all. Avrra jr .Set .fitly Paid Circulation 8407 Mrmfcer; Audit llureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS HOME EDITION 43rd 94 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Truman Keeps Silent About Kansas Voting With President's Political Prestige involved, Voters Will Write Verdict Tues- day Bv KRNEST B. VACCARO KANSAS CITY, Mo., Aug. 5, President Truman, rhampion of tint- candidate, watched silcnt- iv from the sideline.1! at neighbor- ing Independence today as Kan- t's; Citv's democratic congression- al candidates struck tlic final blows of a turbulent campaign. Complaints and eountor-com- of excessive spending and denials marked the climax of the race. With the president's political prestige involved, the district voters will write the verdict tomorrow. Although he has endorsed Enos A. Axtell to unseat Representa- tive Roger C. Slaughter. Mr. Tru- man has remained aloof from the hostilities since his arrival in Jackson county Saturday, main- taining both his silence and his distance from Kansas City. Home To Vote He came home to vote in the fourth district tvith Mrs. Truman and their daughter Margaret, now 22. who will cast her first ballot tomorrow. Jerome Walsh, the third candi- date in the three-way fifth dis- t.-ict race, telegranlu-d an appeal !ast night to Speaker Rayburn of the V. S. house of representatives for a invosligntiin campaign spending by bolh Slaughter and Axlel lie said it amounted to tiie "makings of a national scandal." The reaction came auicklv. Ax- flatly denying Walsh's as- M-rtions, the proposed investigation, snyinc his expendi- tures were well within the legal U. S. To Support Palestine Issue May Go i-5 _ TO U.N. Group British Proposal TRAIN WRECK IN.NEW JERSEY: One locomotive fireman was killed'and 50 persons'injured and burned when a Central Railway of New Jersey commuters' train crashed into another train of the same road at a midtpwn station in Bayonne, New Jersey. This general scene shows the locomo- tive on which the boiler exploded causing most of the Telephoto) limits. Slaughter, calling Walsh's statement insofar as he is concerned, added he would like to see nn investigation of the CIO-political action committee's sofnding in this and other cam- paigns. Makes Address In a Sunday afternoon radio address. Slaughter, who incurred the president's ire because of what Mr. Tiiininn .said was his opposition to administration leg- islation, said the CIO-f'AC mark- ed him for "a purge" long ago. He did not name the president in the speech but declared "I maintain that the congress of the United States must he indepen- dent of the executive." "I denounce the practice of si'lectinc .Missouri candidates in Atlantic City, or New York or Washington." he continued. Tne campaign, ho said, "is be- ing directed not by Missouri dem- ocrats, but by com munis Is and fellow travelers from the east." National attention was center- ed on the contest when President Tru.-nan said he was against the of Slaughter and trial he had talked with James Prndej-gast. political organization leader here, in behalf of Axtell. 'Consumers' Meet, Form Organization Next Meeting of Group Is Scheduled for Friday Night In County Court Room Saturday night saw the incep- tion of the Adu Consumer's League. This league is designed to inquire into the whys and wherefores of the present high cost of living and it's members tire all Ada citizens. The first meeting, held in the headquarters of the I. O. O. F., found League members pledging themselves to a through investi- gation of price differences and the instituting of a committee to investigate unfair rent scales in Ada. The first of many petitions re- questing the Chamber of Com- Senate War Investigators Busy Pursuing New Leads Finishing Touches Put on What Was to Be Final Report; Committee Interested in Questioning Rep. May By JOHN W. HENDERSON WASHINGTON, Aug. war investiga- busy pursuing new the finishing touches today on what originally -had been intended as a final report. Meanwhile members indicated renewed interest in when they might be able to question Rep. May (D.-Ky.) who left his sick- bed here unexpectedly last week for. a rest at his Prestonburg home. Chairman Mead (D.-N.Y.) who remained in the capital for a series of conferences despite last week's congressional adjourn- ment, said a comprehensive re- sume of the committee's work to public-minded citizens for signatures of nil residents of Ada -Newest 'Proposal" He told reporters the current the committee's work, at Reports by rovjng reporters; least tor this session, but that re- wore read regarding the seeming [cent developments pointed to discropcncius in the prices charg- many yet to come, ed by various merchants for iden- ,The newest proposal for the IHjiit Or Wronjr Asserting that Slaughter had opposed virtually all legislation advocated by his administration, the president told a news con- ference that if Slaughter is right, the president, is wrong. He has not seen accord- ing to Presidential Press Secre- tary Charles G. Ross, and has no plans to do so while here. Ross said the president was driving back to Grandvicw, Mo., 1< miles away, this morning, for anotner visit with his 03-year-old mother. Mrs. Martha E. Truman, and his sister. Miss Mary Jane Truman. He made such a visit yesterdav, D lay ing a "couole of 'tunes" on the oiano for his mother, before rrturmng to Independence for it oirtnday dinner for his mother- in-law. Mrs. David K. Wallace, o-.. and a few handshakes with neighbors and their children who came by the summer White .douse. Rainfall Totals .19 Inch Here Sunday's weather in Ada was mn.-e on the pleasant side than it nas been in over a month. Scat- tered showers kept the mercury 'rom Rover 9H degrees while allowing it to drop to 72. The rainfall for Saturday and Sunday totaled .19 inches, it was tnp time that Ada had had rain since July 2 and was a welcome relief. TL'LSA Okla.. Aug. 5, E. Doughtcrly. 65. division super- intendent of production for the Sinclair Prairie Oil company, died last night in a hospital. Ho had been in ill health for 18 months. lical items. The ladies present at the meeting were highly in- censed to find that one store charged 49 cents per pound for steak while another store a few doors clown, charged 54 cents per pound for the same grade and type of steak. The League is determined to be militant about such practices and hopes to find that more and more citizens of Ada will join them in their endeavor. The next meet- ing will be held in the County Court room Friday night, August 9, at p. m. The Consumers League of Ada wants YOU to join with them and make it a pcrmanentand live or- ganization to fight unfair prac- tices that endanger the welfare of the city of Ada. Police Investigate Weekend (rimes; One Car Stolen Police officials made three ar- rests Saturday .and none Sunday to make the weekend one of the quietest in Ada this summer. x One drunk was fined and another was still in jail Monday morning. A negro was arrested Saturday afternoon for drunken- ness, fighting and resisting an of- ficer and was still in jail Monday. No accidents were recorded for either Saturday or Sunday mak- ing it the first weekend in sever- al months that some sort of minor traffic accident hasn't occurred in Ada. The'M P Grocery at 321 West Twelfth was robbed Sunday morning, according to police. The persons who entered the store bored holes in the roof with a brace find bit and then kicked in the weakened portion. Slore offi- cials -did not know what was missing Monday morning but sev- eral rolls of coins were left- un- touched by the thieves. A 1.037 black Chevrolet sedan, owned by Kenneth Preble of Ne- odesha. Kan., was stolen from in front of an Ada cafe Sunday by a man who had been going with Preble and his family from Texas to the Kansas harvest. committee's consideration was a request by Senator Taylor (D.- Ida.) that it inquire into what Taylor termed ''depredations on Rodeo Time Drawing Near Additional Rodeo Stock Un- loaded at Fairgrounds Sunday Afternoon The sale of tickets to the Ada Rodeo is faster this year than it has ever been before and the of- fice opened a week earlier than usual. Earl McKendree, one of! the managers of the event, re- ports that there are still plenty of seats available. Members of the Ada Round-Up club start a series of booster trips Thursday and the caravan will the national treasury" by the na- be in every major town or city tion'jf railroads iri the form of i in southeastern Oklahoma before "sxcessive freight rates paid by the rodeo starts Aug. 14. the armed services." At the name time, Taylor call- It is nine more days until what may be the world's second largest ed on the bureau of the budget to j rodeo gets underway. It will be institute prompt steps through I come the largest outdoor rodeo in the department of justice for re- the world this year if five capac- covery of "overcharges." The Idaho senator said Attorney Gen- eral Clark two months ago 'had announced his willingness to act as soon as the bureau gave the word. Rate .Committee CYV WEATHER Oklahoma Fair panhandle; partly cloudy remainder of state tonight and Tuesday with scat- tered thunder-showers southeast and south central this afternoon and tonight; continued warm; highest temperatures Tuesday 95-100. JEWISH AOENCF REJECTS PLAN BY BRITISH, AMERICAN PARIS, Aug. 5, Jew- ish agency executive rejected to- day the .semi-partition recom- mended for .Palestine by British and American experts. A communique issued follow- ing a meeting of the group, lead- ing Zionist organization, said: "the Jewish agency executive re- gards the British proposals, bas- ed on the report of the commit- tee of six and us announced by Mr. (Herbert) Morrison in the house of commons, as unaccept- able as a basis for discussion." t. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Head Ada Newi Want.Ads., In writing Mead, Taylor called particular attenlion to the "rate committee" of the army, trans- portation corps, which he said was composed largely of officials of the carriers who were in uni- form during the war and who ne- gotiated rates "with their former and future employers." "There is a he add- ed, "whether the close connection which these men enjoyed with the carriers limited their zeal in representing the government." For the present Mead arranged to meet with Clark, Thomas B. McCabe, foreign liquidation commissioner, and internal rev- enue officials in separate confer-" ences concerning the committee's work. He wants to talk to McCabe, Mead said, concerning the com- ity crowds see the event. Another truck load of rodeo slock was unloaded Sunday af- ternoon at the Fairgrounds. The extra stock was purchased after Dick Truitt informed other man- agers of the rodeo that most of the top cowboys at Cheyenne, Wyo., this year are planning to participate in the Ada rodeo. More than round-up club members are expected to parti- cipate in the big parade and grand entry Wednesday, August 14. VEGAS, N. M.. Aug. 4, UP) Like1, Kim, Colo., captured first place in bareback and saddle bronc riding finals for top honors in the 8th annual cowboys' re- union w.hich closed tonight. The final results (finish.in or- der Bull Hill, Can- adian, Tex.; Jim Cobb, Pratt, Kans.; Jack Jackson, Woodward, Okla.; tied for Garner. Chanute, Okla.; and Richard Simms, Pastura. mittee's desire 'to have full re- Ca3f Lee, Fort ports on all sales of surplus prop- Sumner; Doug Poage. Oklaho- erty abroad, particularly as to ima citv' whether critical materials need- ed at home .are going to foreign governments. May Is Still 111 Mead told reporters he expects ed to hear Friday from May's physician as to when the chau--, man of the house military com- mittee will be able to submit to questioning. A family spokesman at Prestonburg described May as ill" 'quite ill. The Kentucky lawmaker is under subpoena by the senate committee to tell under oath of his wartime activities in behalf of the so-called Garsson muni- tions combine. One scheduled ap- pearance failed to materialize when May's doctor told the com- mittee a chronic heart condition had been aggravated, necessita- ting a week or ten d a y s' re st. That was 10 days ago. While the 'committee is in re- cess, members are subject to re- call in event of an and Mead has said such a recall would' be issued if May indicates a readiness to testify. L A T O N, Aug. 5. Charles L. Conwill, president emeritus of Cameron college, and Mrs. Conwill left 'Lawton today for1 California where they will make their home near Los An- geles. Conwill retired from active as- sociation with the college several weeks ago because of his health. He had been affiliated with the school-16 Oklahoma Youths Are in Washington w OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. Haylor H. Fisher. Jr.-, 19, of Shawnee and Joe Carmichael, 18, Hem-yetta, were in Washing- ton, today attending an American Legion sponsored Boys Nation. The two Oklahoma boys were accompanied by Charles B. Mim- rr.inger. Oklahoma Boys State director. The Oklahoma Boys State at Sulphur was cancelled because of the polio death of Helen Gough, daughter of the former superintendent of the school, for deaf there the week the session wns planned. The Oklahoma boys, along with 113 others from various states, will meet President Truman dur- ing the'week and will'be given an insight into the way the govern- ment runs. LT. GEN. McCAIN SPEAKS TO HENEYETTA LEGION HENRYETTA, Okla., Aug. Gen. Raymond S. Mc- Clain, 'Oklahoma City, in an ad- dress before the second district American Legion convention yes- terday, urged adoption of the o ii e-y e a r compulsory military plan. Prime Minister Attlee Will Ask Cabinet Whether. To Submit Issue to Assembly LONDON. Aug. 5, Minister Attlee will ask the Bri- tish cabinet Wednesday whether to submit the Palestine issue to the United Nations assembly, government sources said today. This became known a few hours after a Moscow broadcast declaring that attempts to solve the holy land problem without United Nations help "are leading nowhere." Moscow, in the first Russian comment upon the Bri- tish-American proposals for a semi-partition of Palestine, at- tacked the plan vigorously. The British in any event would refer the question to the United Nations only if President'Truman flatly rejected the partition pro- posals, the sources said. Bevin To Attend Foreign Secretary Ernest Bev- in. who has been ill since July 27, will attend the cabinet meetinsr. Colonial Secretary George Hall talked Friday with Dr. Chaim Weizmann, president of the world Zionist federation. As a result of these talks the cabinet will be asked to determine the basis on which world Jewry is to be rep- resented at any coming con- ferences concerning Palestine's future. Hall is expected to recommend that not only Palestine Jews but those representative of such in- ternational, bodies as the world Zioftist federation be invited to talks, due ta be held within the next six weeks in London. Such invitations would be ana- lagous to those sent by the foreign office to Arabs outside Palestine such as the seven mem- ber-states of the Arab league. Angles Studied Tiie cabinet will consider also releasing from detention all Jew- ish agency and trade union lead- ers not accused of terrorist, activ- ities: Palestine Jewish leaders have declared their particioation in any talks with the British country's fu- ture is conditional on these re- leases. The whole question of illegal immigration oj Jews from central and southern France into Pales- tine is being considered by Bri- tish departmental chiefs. T h e government is investigating a reported "pipeline" said to ex- tend from Germany, through Austria and Italy, across the I Mediterranean to Palestine to car- ry Jewish displaced- persons into the Holy. Land. 7- Illegal immigrant ships pres- ently' being intercepted are al- lowed to discharge their passen- gers, whose numbers are credited to Jewry's monthly auota of 1.- 500 .immigration certificates. But it is "more than one source said, that an interim policy will be laid down by the British government to control the current influx until a long-term firm policy is evolved. Winston Churchill, war-time prime minister, declared a few days ago that Britain should sur- render her mandate and put the Palestine problem up to the Unit- ed Nations unless a plan for the country evolved on which the United. States and Britain could cooperate. v Attlee's move came amid new tension in the Holy Land as a result of a broadcast by the ille- gal Irgun Zvan Leumi resistance group in Palestine' threatening "new and blows against our British The .broadcast said if the Bri- tish again imposed a curfew, as they did in Tel Aviv last wc'ek when an intensive search was carried out by troops for terrorists and arms, "the resi- dents will receive orders to go into the streets at curfew time and if the' British start shooting, there'll be British victims too." Marines Stay In North China Commander of Seventh Fleet Gives First Identifica- tion of Attackers By SPENCER MOOSA SHANGHAI, Aug. American marines in north China are remaining there at their full current strength and "when we are attacked we are going to shoot Adm. Charles M. Cooke, Jr., commander of the U.S. Seventh fleet, told a news conference today as he discussed the July 29 ambushing of a ma- rine convoy near Peiping. He identified the attackers, who killed the four marines, as Chinese communists. It the first official identification of them. In Nanking, the pro-govern- ment newspaper Ta Kang Pao yesterday that "the hottest rumor here is that President Tru- man has instructed General Mar- shall to prepare plans for with- drawal of U. S. forces from China" to avoid another such in- cident. Washington sources said they knew of no basis for such a re- port; and in Independence, Mo., where President Truman was va- cationing. Presidential Secretary Charles G. Ross said he knew of no order, for withdrawal. There have been some reduc- tions in marine personnel in China in the past, Admiral Cooke told newsmen, but "there are nine now in progress or Present marine strength in China is to men, he said. (Unofficial estimates at the peak, months ago, were Marines were sent to China to carry out the U.S. policy of re- patriating Japanese and to assist in the restoration of stabilized, -peaceful conditions, A d-m i r a 1 Cooke explained. Beoys Even in New York NEW YORK. Aug. 5. "Boys will be boys" is an adage trite but true even piano prodigies. Twelve-year-old Bela Szilagyi was the object of a police search until he turned up at home last night after a 24-hour which included a sightseeing trip to Chinatown, horror movies in Times Square, comic books and malted milks. His mother had told police that Bela, who made his debut in Car- negie Hall last May, was "not like other boys." "I can't imagine him running off to go swimming or see Coney Island or something like that. All he thinks about is music." Model Airplane Club to Be Formed Tuesday night, at p.m., the first meeting of the Ada Model Airplane club will be held at the Ada Youth Center, in the Con- vention hall. The purpose of this meeting is to organize a model airplane club for Ada. The club will be spon- sored by the Veterans of. Foreign Wars with Ivan Button in charge at the first meeting. i All model enthusiasts, whether it be airplanes or other types of i models, are invited to attend the initial meeting of the club. Read The News Classified Ads. Puerto Rico Feels Quake Weather Bureau Says Ma- jor Shock Felt or Trinidad, Damage Slight MIAMI, Fla., Aug. radio message from Ciudad Tru- jillo reported that a fresh tremor shook Die Dominican republic at a.m. (eat) today in the wake of yesterday'j violent earthquake in the Caribbean area. Pan American Airways in Miami said a message from its Ciudad Trujillo airport described the tremor as being "of slight in- tensity." No further details were given. Available reports indicated that yesterday's series of quakes apparently centered in the deep- est hole in the Atlantic ocean and was so intense that it knocked out a recording seismograph in St. Louis, more than miles away, but caused little 'surface damage. One report said five tremors hit Ciudad Trujillo, capital of the Dominican republic, yesterday, with one of the tremors lasting 45 seconds. Reports of n tidal wave lacked any confirmation here. CHJDAD TRUJILLO, Domini- can Republic, Aug. waves, set in motion by strong earth tremor.-, which were con- tinuing today, swept into a num- ber of coastal points of this Car- ibbean island at noon yesterday. The ports or Malanxas, Nagua and Puerto Plata were affected by high waters. There was no immediate re- port of any damage due to the waves. The tremors interrupted radio communications with the outside world for hours and in- terfered with the gathering of in- formation concerning the situa- tion at the stricken ports. The quake came as this oldest city .of the western hemisphere., celebrated the 450th anniversary of its establishment by Barto- Iqrne Columbus, the great navi- gator's brother. (Puerto Rico felt a fluctuation of several inches in the tide, but the effects were negligible. Dam- age in Son Juan was slight and no casualties were reported. The weather bureau there said a major shock was felt at Trini- (Slight tremors were felt in Curba. The Virgin islands had only a mild shock with no dam- age Oklahoma" City Woman Drowns OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. she was able to save her 6-year-old niece, Mrs. Elcena Leverieh, 16, Oklahoma City, drowned yesterday when she stepped into deep water while wading in Lightner Creek near here. When Mrs. Leverieh went into the deep water, her husband, Jack Leverieh, swam toward her and reached hij wife just as she thrust the child upward as she went down. He look the child to safety but when he returned, he was unable to find his wife who could not swim. The .body was found an hour later by a fire department res- cue squad. HANOI, Indochina, Aug. forces ambushed a French convoy yesterday, kill- ing 12 soldiers'and wounding 41. The nine-hour fight was at the village of Bac Ninh, 39 miles northeast of Hanoi. Annamite casualties were not announced. China Joins Group to Help Break Tie-up Byrnes Promises to Support Council on Any Decisions Voted by Two-Thirds Of Conference By LYNN PARIS, Aug. The United States and China today threw their support behind a British compromise proposal to solve the deadlock in the Paris pence conference on voting pro- cedure. The British plan would permit the conference to make recom- mendations to the foreign minis- ters of Britain, France, Russia and the United States on the five peace treaties either by a two- thirds or a simple majority vote. A British spokesman explained thnl a proposal voted by two- thirds of the conference would be regarded by the four foreign ministers as n '.'firm recommen- dation" to be considered "very seriously." A'; recommendation voted by a siinnle majority would carry less weight. Byrnes Takes Floor Secretary of State Byrnes, tak- inc the floor in the rules com- mittee after a lone wrangle in which representatives of the smaller powers argued for a rule to permit recommendations by a simple majority, said lie had de- cided it was "the practical to do." to support the British .suggestion. Byrnes promised to support in the foreign ministers council any decision voted by two-thirds of the conference, even though had voted the other 'way .in the conference. He said there were 28 ques- tions on which the council was not. in agreement "some of them very important" anrl on which members of the council were not bound to vote together in the con- Terence. Jf the other members of the council would make tile same of- 'fer that he had, Byrnes said, "it will be the conference rather than the foreign ministers council which will write the treaties" on the questions on which the coun- cil is not in agreement. Answers Argument He thus sought to answer the argument of the smaller powers that as long as the four principal powers vote together there is lit- tle or no possibility of obtaining ii two-thirds vote in the confer- ence .1 gainst any decision of council. It was understood that the French and British delegations were ready to go along with Unifpd Slates in pledging support to the conference's two-thirds majority votes in the council. One imrjortant Question on which the foreign ministers are not agreed is the future adminis- 
                            

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