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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 4, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Here's another difference in the point of local teacher says it's a month until school and football, while the non-teacher comments that a month will bring football and school. Nrt July I'alcJ circulation 8407 Mrmbrr: Audit Mure an of t'lrctilittlnit THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd ADA, OKLAHOMA, 4, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY' City Council Votes to Accept Three Federal Advance-Survey Grants, May Return Two Others City Worker List Given Department Heads Named y City Manager Turn In of Their Employes Acting Cily Manager Luke 11. Podds has announced appoint- ments of various depiirlmenl heads for Die branches of citv employccs over to the city treas- urer in the form of a payroll, An ordinance fixing'the sal- aries to be received by 7-1 cily employees was passed at the Outspoken Meeting Ends with Vote Thot Provides for Planning on Three Projects; C of C Committee Asks Improvements The first meetings of the city conncC were.hardly warm as cornpnrccl to the open fire, slniiyht-forward and outspoken meeting Friday night when the councilmen accepted three federal advance-survey grants, but indicated that two of the first meeting of the already accepted grants will be returned unused. Throe meetings were for the possibilities of the federal grants to he discussed. They wen; accepted only after a rccommon- i dnlloii by a Chamber of Com- morce industrial committee. It was suggested lhat Ihc cily make advances for the proposed issues rather than accepting fed- eral grants and if Ihc grants were accepted the voting public should ready for Iho projects before uncil cnmilruclion is started and before' any commitments were made. One visitor left the impression wanting the things over- in one of the most lengthy dis- cussions yet held by the council- men. Following i? a list of appointees find the salaries to be paid: Actini; Manager I. u k r Duchls, City Treasurer Hay Martin iissisla.nl to the cily treasurer. Mrs. Joy Ligon, Mrs. Flossie Koberls, chief clerk of the water office. two clerks. Dorothy Tolliver and 13il- l.e Thornason, each. Police Dvpnrttneiil Quinton Blake, chief of police, 4200; Cecil Smith, assistant chief of police, J. M. Carter, J. W. Choale and Troy Tiptnn, desk serue.-ints. each; f r a n k Smith. Luther Davis, Arthur Ray, Brenlee T. J. Buss and J. H. Ramsey, patrolmen, each. Dave Alberts, negro patrolmen, Ed Haley chief of the fire de- partment, Vernon Vomit, assistant chief of the fire depart- ment. Wayne Vickers, Her- man Landrilh. Arthur Floyd, Archie Leach Dudley Young, T. H. Halev. Harvey Shipmnn and Bill Kllis each; Chester mechanic and fireman, Street Department Burrell Oliver, of Klmor J.' N. Fuller, I len- l.v Kimmel nnd Ira Jenkins, department employees Ocnp Klcppcr, superintendent the water department, Tollip Fowler. Joe Thompson, Jfick West, Koy Hose, Hill Wig- Yirl I.i.man. Jack Milligan H. L. (Dick) Akins, each. Dale West, superintendent of cemeteries. S150. Luther Cond- :on. superintendent of parks, John Massey. ail-port cleparl- ment superintendent, Hum- Kf-ed, K. H. Matherly and O. T. Hunt, disposal plant em- A. N. Franklin, mpervisor of thc incinerator and disposal plant, Man T.. Manuel, janitor at the Con- vention hall and pound man, Miss Hazel Whaley, libra- rian, Douglas Epperson and GIpria Wood, assistant librarians, S3 Mrs. Dale West, swimming cool! mako contacts" with young attendant per month; Mrs. who are qualified to en- Jack Tyree. swimming pool nt- t- thai Ihu public is council lo do some................. night lhat commissioners have not done during the pasl 10 years. May Divide 1'rojccls The council indicated lhat the city may not give every one of the projects to one man as two of the la.st three grants accepted have not been allocated to any particular person, A visitor said that there arc not enough citizens interested in the functions ot the council be- cause Iho number allonding reg- ular and called meetings is at a minimum. Tho slra'ghl forward talk real- ly started when City AUorney Mack Braly started asking direct questions lo bo answered briefly by George Tolor. Check on Coininllmcnlx Braly asked if thc city is legal- ly bound and Toler replied that he didn't know, but the situation can lie remedied by employing another person. "Legal or not, if Ihc city ac- cepts (hi; grants, the municipality is going lo have lo enter a con- tract with Toler or someone Enlistments Begin Coming in For National Guard Here Knlist.monl in thc local units ot the '15th Division reactivated as I lie Oklahoma National Guard division, is due lo pick up rapid- ly this week. f, There were 13 men signed up Friday and Saturday and more than that having already indi- cated that they will enlist as soon as they are able lo come lo the reeruilini! office. This office is in the front part of the VFW headquarters over the Corner Drug store. Tho officers arc taking 'turn about1 much of thc time staying in the office to fill out applications for thc men, so that Capt. Bob They Come Long Distances, Too, For Ada's Rodeo "Me and my wife and four kids Ye going to the rodeo this was thc comment of a fellow who lives about  f Nocona, Texas, and Earl of Ok- ahoma City: and two daughters, Mrs. E. L. McFarland and. Mrs. Lee Conner of McAlester. Mr. O'Neal was one of the best -cnown citizens of this part of the tate. He was born Feb. 12, 1868, t Gatewood, Mo., and came to his part of Oklahoma while still Union Valley Area Gets Hail, Rain Ado Swelters Saturday Under 1021 Degree Heat considered an Korea should be' opponent of the young man. Better returns for amount in- ested. Ada News Want Ads. For a small area around Union Valley the thunder and heavy cloud of Saturday afternoon meant something a heavy hail and small rainstorm. But the. remainder of the coun- ty sweltered through a -muggy afternoon which saw the govern- ment thermometer in Ada take off on a .flight up to 102 de- grees. The hail 'and rain fell so brisk- ly for a time southeast of Ada that motorists had to halt. their poned when Judge Summers'Ya'id automobiles because they could he had to attend to judicial mat- not see far enough head for safe ters in another pari of his dis- driving. The rain extended to Old v" Ahloso and fizzled out a little farther on. up the highway. Moscow decision. He stressed that the American delegation held tha't such an attitude denied the right of freedom of speech. Grateful For U. S. Port "The people, of south Korea (American zone) were keenly disappointed with the turn political continued the report, "'but they were grateful for American efforts in behalf of Korean independence." A deteriorating food situation for Korea was reported, due to poor prospects for the rice crop, substandard production, the growing number of people de- pendent on the government for supplies and the influx of Korean repatriates. I Collars a day." Gunman Admits He Is Ashamed of Work PHILADELPHIA, Aug. gunman who admitted he is "Pshamcd" of his predicted he would be took today from Maidiros Kalidjian, 66-year-old shore re- pairman. According to Kalidjian, the shabbily dressed negro pointed a pistol, backed him into a yard behind the shop and rifled his pockets while being told "you ought to be ashamed of yourself, holding up an old man like me who only makes two or three their own food products. LOVVREY NEW TRIAL BID UP FOR HEARING SOON TAHLEQUAH, Okla., Aug., 3, on an application tor a new trial for Vance J. Lowrey, 40, former Indian agency employe convicted of manslaugh- ter ir. the slay ing i of his pretty Butler, 27, will probably be held next week, Dis- trict Judge E. A. nounced today. Summers an- The hearing originally schedul- ed for late this week was post- Talk by the forecaster wasn't too encouraging, with its mention of partly cloudy and a few wide- ly scattered thunderstorms. trict, Lowrey was found guilty last Tuesday and the jui-y recom- mended a 25-year prison term. His first trial last May ended in a jury deadlock. plied. "I know I'll get caught. But there's nothing I can do about it I can't find a job. This is the only wav 1 know (o make a Then ho handed back a quar- ter and walked away. Read The News Classified Ads. NEW WAY TO ESCAPE HOLLYWOOD, Aug. 3, Police reported a new way loday to escape death-toss yourself over a cliff. Bradley Wayne, 24, taxi driver, told them three passengers, rob- bed, then bound and gagged him on a hillside road then announc- ed they were going to kill him, So he rolled over the edge of a 200-foot precipice. Fifty feet down, brush stopped his fall. Nearby residents, hearing his screams, called police who haul- ed him to safely with a rope. Better returns for amount in- vested. Ada -News Want Ads. majority." "If thc other big powers, in ad- dition ,lo their promises of free and complete discussion, are willing to accept a similar en- gagement, it seems to me the at- mosphere would suddenly clear and that our work here would get under way in hnppy circum- stances." Spaak said. No Nccil For .Suspicion "The big powers must not be suspicious of us. We are not here seeking to impose measures or opinions but to find the best for- mula for a just and sUible peace." Tho peace of the world, he de- clared, depended on "a good un- derstanding between the great powers and it is the duty of all lo contribute toward this under- standing." The Russians have insisted upon the two-thirds rule. Threa days ago Byrnes said he would support it. Dr. Herbert V. Evatt, Australian minister of external affairs and champion of the small nations, became the spearhead of opposition, favoring a simple majority. Dmitri Mar.uilsky. foreign minister and chief delegate of the Ukraine delegation, greeted with thunderous applause when he quoted Premier Stalin as say- ing "neither the nations nor the armies want any new war." Russian sources hero said Stal- in made tho statement in the last Red army day exercises. Manuilsky announced that his delegation would support four-power foreign ministers de- cision to internationalize Trieste, but he criticized it roundly, as- serting that thc Adriatic port should go to Yugoslavia. FREIGHT! CAR GRINDS OF7 BOTH OF MAN'S LEGS STILWELL. Okla., Aug., 3, Wi Center, 67. was seriously injured here today when a freight car under which he was crawling ground off both his legs. TH' PESSIMIST Nearly ever' married cou- ple longs fer th' peacefulness an' happiness o' married life. Most city fellers want t' live on n little m supervisory capacity, that is.   

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