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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 1, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Even the big 'uns slip up on their United Nations Assembly is to meet Sept. 23 and if the Paris peace conference isn't over the result will be a very awkward situation. Avttuft June raid Circulation 8310 Mtmbrr: Audit Murcau o( Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd !H ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 194B I IVK CKNTS TIIK'COPV Today Begins Enlistment In Stale Guard dispute involving states. The session-end Office Set Up Here, No- tional Guard Units Here Offer Attractive Setup "R" Day, rcornnizutinn clay for the National Guard, will geti started in a big way in Ada with I an enlistment office being set uplctnt lf> PC1< on employes piiy and employers payrolls next Row Involving Rich and Poor States Trips Hurrying Congress By ritANCIS M. LEMAY WASHINGTON, Aug., 1, ticc. This would give the court full rights -to settle a wide as- Racing toward final adjournment isortment of America's legal dis- hy nightfall tomorrow, the his-1putes with other nations. A two- toric 79th wrote thirds senate vote is necessary rules of war and charted a course to today over a rich and poor deadlock is over social security legislation. And, unless congress acts, it will, result in an increase of old age in.sunmcc taxes from one per January 1. Meanwhile, the lawmakers a flood of other last minute bills 11: to the White House. I GI Terminal Pay Passes These were the fast-moving session-end developments: 1. The GI termin- al pay bill wns put on President' in the front office of the VFW hall in the 100 Work east Main. Thursday. Aug. 1, is reorgani- zation day throughout the United Stater, according to C'npt. Kobert V. Sarrett, battery i-ommunder in Ada. The office for enlistment will be open from f) to 12 a. in., 1 to 5 p. in. and from 7 lo II p. m. at, any time during office hours, rnon interested in enlisting can obtain information from the of- ficer in charge. S.-irrett will be in charge of enlistments most of the day. The number of clays that enlist- ments will be accepted lit Ihe VFW office has not been set by officers of the unil to be aclivat- cd in Ada. Headquarters and Headquart- ers Battery, 171st Field Artillery Battalion, will be commanded by Lt. Col. Joe G. Ciilhey, who has announced that plans for Iho ac- tivation of the unit arc progress- ing. Officers have announced that a large number of ratings are available for qualified person- nel. All National Guard personnel except general officers receive one day's base pay for each auth- orised drill attended after the unit has received federal but nition. Rates of pay are the same as those provided for the regular nrmy by the Pav Adjust- ment Acl of IU42, as amended. Ada Rodeo Is News Now Over Widening Area as Ads Spread You don'l have to stay in Ada to learn that the Ada 'Rodoo is riearing its annual ''great show of rodeo competition and cnlertain- for the motion to carry. House action is not required, 3. An attempt to1 enact the an- ti-poll lax bill before congress quits failed yesterday when the senate refused to limit debate. Last Money Bill Up 4. The senate brought forward the last appropriation bill of the measure including more funds for the payments on the GI terminal pay 5. The senate war investigating committee continued its inquiry into war contracts. There were indications, however, it will take an extended summer recess. Along with a raft of minor Trim-inn's desk. It cleared both bills, Mr. Truman yesterday sign- 11 in senate, imcl house yesterday, j ed n measure authorizing the Senator Morse (K-Orcgon) j treasury to sell its unpledged moved in the senate for oc'ccp- silver nt 00.5 cents an ounce, and lance of compulsory jurisdiction to buy newly mined silver at the of the international court of jus-'same price. Mr. Truman used a silver pen to affix his signature. GOP Group Blocks Action -House democratic leaders re- sorted to extraordinary means to break the threat to adjournment deve- loped as a group of republicans launched a last ditch battle a- ganlst a senate provision of the social security bill that would give proportionately larger fed- eral grants to low income states for needy aged, blind, and depen- dent children. Both chambers have passed the security bill, freezing the security resurrected OP A and money for tax foi. anoiher at ono ITufmrtmlti I Vio lit foi.Minril _. r _ cent. The rise to two and one- hnlf-pcrcent would be automatic otherwise. Rep. Knutson (R-Minn) block- ed efforts to send the legislation; by the usual unanimous consent method, 'to a house-senate con- ference committee for an ironing out of Knutson said he would exhaust every means to remove the varia- ble grants provision from the bill. Council To Mee! Friday City Council Heart More Evidence, Argument On Propotcd Survey Grants As far as any business transac- tions taking place nt the thfrd meeting of the City Council there ment features. Cowboy Larson has been at over this area and in downtown sections now wear his colorful of cowboys in action. CoflllKCTION Wednesday's paper In .t story the forthcoming Ada Itmlco stated thnt a parade in which some 2000 horsemen would participate, w o u I il licit) Wednesday afternoon, August 1. It .should have read Wedncs- diy afternoon, August 14. pictures are in Tisho- Sulphur, We- Madill, Pauls Valley. M a y s v i 1 I e. Lindsay, Chic-kasha and after all. the Ada Hodeo has crime to be some- thing of an area affair, not just a local concern, with this part of Oklahoma increasingly p i- o u d thsit one of the greatest outdoor rocioos if. held here each year. Two automobiles are out on a four day Irip through southern and southeastern Oklahoma and north Texas now distributing ad- vertising for the show. The giimt 'steer' is over :il ing and learned the steps being taken on a number of questions before the group of city officials. Members of the Chamber of Commerce Industrial committee were present and look part in the discussion pcrlninlnp lo three advance grants amounting lo nl- mosl that hnve been of- fered the city, New Rained New Weil Has Bread Price Proved Self _ Decision Due There who! lit; r Home Well Mak- ing More Than 150 Barrels Daily Now The new oil well on the land of the Baptist Orphans Home six miles north of Ada is definitely a "good well." After being shot and cleaned out, the well is making more than 150 barrels of oil daily, says F. P. Lanahan, Salina, Kas., oil man Who drilled it, Last week surface pipe was set a well across the highway to e drilled for Drexel Sales, his No. 1 Parker, SW SE NE of 33-5-6. The orphans home owns, in all, 130 acres more of land most of which lies north of Iho Parker test, which will be watched with additional Interest because of the wns n question as to i possible effect it may haye on the the city would accept the funds being offered by the federal government. There was a question as lo whether the funds could be accepted in good faith, that bonds will be voted by thn citizens of Ada during the next four years. It was pointed put by one councilman thnl he didn't believe that the city would vote 000 worth of bonds within the next 10 years, to say nothing iiboul the four years mentioned i by the government. One citizen present said that he didn't think the city should ac- cept a dime of the advance grant unless the city expects to go jnto a proiecl. Other Services Available Such tv.ingo, Okcinah. Holdfnvill Chic-kasha and neighboring Irr- ntory today. And the tichfl urdcrs continue to pom iti. Th'.'rt' is no need tci woiry iibr.ul liny yet, however, for seats for live perform.-inces makes liO.OOO units, and Hint's a lot nf room. The box seats have been pretty well picked over and a number of regular fans are getting their favorite locations in the stands. Tennesseeans Vole On Sen. McKellar NASHVILLE. Tonn.. Aug. l._ n-P' Tonnessoiins voted today to say whether they'll return' 77- year-old Sen. K. D. McKellar, veteran of years in the senate and president pro tern of tho body, for umithcr six-year term. Kour opponents faced him in the Deinocnitie primary election, including .1 -ifi-yejir-rjl'd lawyer, Edward W.ird C.'irmaek, who came within a few thousand votes of unsealing Tennessee's lunior senatnr, Tom Stewart, four years .'igu. More than .'100.000 votes were expected to he cast. A plurality alone "lecc.ssnrv for nomina- tion and the Democratic noinina- WASHINGTON, Aug. tion is usually equivalent to dec- President Truman is Another citizen asserted that the services of the Oklahoma and U. S. Geological Surveys should be required before any agreement was made. Several of the peopln present were surprised to learn how some of the projects were being handl- ed. However, it was the first meeting that these people had til- tended. One official said thai tho nd- vance. grunt was one way of at- tacking an expected depression, lie. continued by reminding thnt some of thn projects for which advance -grants have been ap- proved were voted down in a bond election last year. George To lor, consulting cn- (Continued on Page 2, Col. 2) Thermometer Was Not Superheated The temperature in Ada Wed- nesday was identical lo the read- ing reported for Tuesday. A high of 94 degrees was registered by the government mercury and a low of 69 degrees was found for Wednesday night. The. Associated Press reports th.it sun-suffering Oklahomans were told Thursday they could expecl nothing but "fair and con- tinued warm weather, possibly excepting the northwest section institution's acreage. .The new producer was drilled feet. Byrnes In Touch About Palestine Situation 1, President Tru'mon said today that he had' been in touch with Secretary of State Byrnes at Paris -in connection with the Palestine situation. But in response to a news con- ference question whether he had been in consulation with British Prime Minister Atllcc, the presi- dent said no, (In1 London, the Evening Star reported Mr. Truman and Mr. Altlee had an important tele- phone conversation about Pales- tine Mr. Truman told reporters lie had no comment on the Palestine problem beyond what he had said in a statement yesterday. He announced then lhal he hud call- ed homo Ambassador Henry Grady and other members of the American cabinet committee in London for talks on the proposal lo set aside special Jewish and Arab zones in Palestine in pre- paration for admitting more Jews. On.Knottier foreign policy qiies- UOM, Mr, Truman said that the United Stales has nol made any inquiry respecting' published rc- porls of religious and racial per- secutions in Yugoslavia. -Told that the United States commercial .corporation had been accused in a dispatch from Tokyo of mishandling Japanese silk ex- porls, he said he had no com- menl. One qucslioncr asked 'for com- ment on a report published in the Honolulu Advertiser that Pearl Harbor is as vulnerable to- day as at the time of Ihc suc- cessful Japanese attack in because of the command setup. Mr. Truman also replied he had nothing to say about it, adding OPA Chief Advised by As- sistants to Favor Boost In Bread, Flour Prices By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITH WASHINGTON, Aug. government is trying lo reach a decision today on whe- ther to allow price increases of a penny a loaf on bread and about a cent a pound on flour. Top OPA and agricultue de- partment officials conferred on this as the new price decontrol board pushed plans to start pub- lic hearings by August 12 on this price ceilings be re- issue: Should stored August: 20 on meats, dniry products, grains, cotton seed and soy beans? Chairman L. Thompson announced soon as the board has decided this, it will, tackle .the qud'stibn of whether controls should go back on eggs, poultry, tobacco and petroleum. Ceilings cannot be re-invoked on these latter items before Aug- ust 20 in any event, nor there- after without bonrd. consent of the of the state, the forecast for I that he. had not been to'PearJ in this border stale. Most women iire capable of n-.akini; their own wny. says a professor. Hut most of them mar- ry to have their own Way. iWEATHER OKLAHOMA Parlly cloudy tonight and Friday; warmer southeast tonight; cooler nurlh- wert and north central Friday ttftrniuon. which was slightly lower tem- peratures Friday. Teinpernlurcs over the stale ranged from a high of 104 at i Alvii, to lows of at Waynoka nntl Burllcsville. __ tf Truman Studying Tidelandi Bill having the Ticlelancls bill studied before announcing a decision on .wheth- er he will sign or veto il, he told his news conference today. The measure, which has been passed by congress, would give Ihe stales clear lille lo off shore hinds, including oil reserves, within their 'borders. It provides a federal qtiil claim lo the lille. Mr. Trumiin, replying to a question, said he is 'having the Harbor. measure studied and would let the reporters know when he made his decision. Secretary of the interior Krug has said he would recommend a veto, Krug said it is a miillor for Ihc courts rather than congress, Eleven Killed In Navy Bomber Fall SAN DIEGO, Calif., Aug. least H service person- nel, one of them believed In be a woman, were killed today in the crash of navy privateer four-en- gine bomber four miles west of nearby Camp Kearny. The llth naval district reported that the plane, a land-based pa- trol bomber, crashed and burned four minutes after taking off from Camp Miramar marine air field cnrouto to Dallas. The craft carried a crew of five and six nrmy and navy pas- sengers. The navy said all Ihe passengers were officers. E, A. Turner, deputy coroner, said 11 bodies had been taken to As for the possibility of high- i er bread and flour prices, an of- ficial in a position to know told a reporter privately thai a boost in ceilings has been recommend- ed to OPA Chief Paul Porter by his aides. However, even if Porter con- curs, the approval of the agricul- ture department is required .to put increases on these food items effect. The recommendation submit- ted to Pouter is based on a tenta- tive decision against restorating the flour subsidy which lapsed July 1. In this decision OPA of- ficials took the stand that the subsidy could be paid again only if the decontrol board votes to restore ceilings on wheat. Porter and the agriculture de- partment must review this deci- sion too. The subsidy held down retail prices a cent a loaf on bread and about a cent a pound on flour. Since it lapsed there has been no upward adjustment of ceilings to compensate millers for loss of the government payments. ____________ fc, Emy Goering Now Poor and Shabby Hitchhikes to Nuernberg, Not Allowed to See Hui- bond in Jail There NUERNBERG, Germany, Aug. ajid shabby, the once haughty Emmy Goering walked and hitchhiked to Nuern- berg jail and pleaded tearfully to see the former reichsmarshal "just once more." She was turn- ed down. Mistress oC Goering's once vast fortune, Emmy has lived in vir- tual poverty at, nearby .Neuhaus and has not seen her husband since he surrendered. She walked fivo miles along a dusty road and begged n ride with a passing motorist for the other, 15 miles to the old court- house and jail in downtown Nu- ernberg the other day. Once ushered into offices of the principal prosecutors, Emmy abandoned her imperious de- meanor and humbly begged to visit "my man" who is cooped in a tiny cell only a hundred yards away. Attorneys told her it was "im- possible" and thnt the regula- lions imposed the day the Start After Shell Defect Information Senate Group Seeks Re- sponsibility for Shell Fail- ures That Killed Americans By JOHN W. HENDERSON WASHINGTON, Aug. The senate war investigating committee set out today on the back-trail of defective chemical mortar shells which killed Am- erican soldiers in the Battle of the Bulge. Concluding the first phase of its open hearings on war con- tracts, the committee announced it will give "high priority" to a separate "major investigation" seeking lo fix responsibility for failure of the shells and the res- ultant casualties. Maj. Gen, Alden H. Wuitt, chief of the warfare service, estimated In testimony last week that 10 or 12 soldiers were kilted by premature shell-bursts, but said he didn't think it was pos- sible to pin the blume on any one manufacturer. A later report re- vised the number of casualties upward to 29 killed and 83 in- ijured. Erie One of Contractors Erie Basin Metal. Products, Inc., j one firm in the Garsson combine war manufacturers under in- vestigation, held a big contract for the 4.2 shells. Waitt noted that other companies made tho an me size shell. Announcing the investigation in a statement, the committee made public a questionnaire it will circulate chiefly among for- mer military men having "first- hand knowledge of the facts." The announcement came after the committee's activilies had produced these other develop- ments: 1. James P. McGranery, assist- ant to the attorney general, testi- fied that tho three-year statute of limitations barred any action in connection with Iho payment from a Tacoma, Wash., defense contractor to Paul A. Ol- son, former secretary to Rep. Coffee Otherwise, he would have submitted the facts to a grand jury. 2. Coffee acknowledged there was "perhaps a question of eth- ics" involved in the case but de- nied that either he or Olson was "guil'ty of any crime." Mitchell General 3. Senator Mitchell. a committee member, raised in the senate a question as to the "technical competence" and "moral caliber" of General Wailt, whose testimony concerning the chemical shell failures, he said, contained "errors and contradic- tions." 4. Senator Magnuson (D- I Wash.) expressed the hope to the Of wnitinc re senate the committee would have 1, frlt lr Molotov Agrees To Idea Of Opening Conference To All Questions On Treaty Drafts Proposal Is From Greeks AMERICAN OFFICERS RELEASED HY RUSSIANS: Captain Harold Corbin, left, Newark, New Jersey, mid Lt. George Wyotl, Oklahoma City, arc both very happy about, thu whole They are shown at U. S. Military headquarters in Berlin after being freed by the Russians, who held them in several weeks, first as spies, then visitors." Nu hard- ships were endured, the pair House Plannng To Change GI Terminal Leave Pay lo Cash By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON, AUK., I, The GI lerminnl pay bill huacliad for President Truman's desk today as house inembers laid plans to get around its "payment in. bonds" provision early next year. The measure cleared both chamber of congress yesterday. Acting Insf. the house contended itself for the present with de- nouncing the senate inspired bond-payment plan. Members were, afraid !.o reject it lest Ihe legislation get lost in controversy during the closing days of the session. But the chamber loft no doubt regarding its future plans. From both sides of the aisle came de- mands that the new congress, convening next January, enact a I bill permitting holders of the lo cash them' immediately nnxi'defendants were segregated for trial were inviolate. M.USKOGEE, Aug. 1, Five new buses, recently bought s-n to by the. Muskogec city school sys- a San Diego mortuary and he wm be nlneevl in nnoratinn was checking lo determine if one ald0 bod'ils in the wreckage which was scat- tcrcd over a 200-yard area. wm be nlneevl in of schoo in the vehicles" io USe by Ihe separate schools. Greater returns for amount In- vested. Kcud Ada News Want Ads. termed the "arrogance" of Gen- eral Brehon Somervell, retired chief of the army service forces. Charge Discrimination Republican leader Joseph W. AAF Celebrating 39lh Birthday As World's Mightiest WASHINGTON, Aug. The Army Air Korties. which be.- with throe men .'iiuJ no air- eelobr.-jted its birth- day today with n flourish in keeping with its war :is the world's mightiest. Some 400 of the thousands of combat nircrafl left over from Magnuson contended Somcrvell i Martin, Jr., of Massachusetts had "squandered practically i joined demicratic members in of American money" criticii-.ir.fi the bond provision. in connection with the wartime Alaska highway and Canol pro- jects.' 5. The Erie Basin firm went be- fore the U. S. tax court to fight the government's effort to get a cash return of of alleged excessive profits made in 1043. The war department's war con- tracts price adjustment board claimed thnt the companies prof- its for one year amounted lo 150 times UN "tangible net worth." 0. Senator Ferguson (R-Mich.) urged thnt records nf the com- mittee be examined by any one preparing the government's de- fense to Erie's court petition. Truman Stays Out Of Tennessee Vote co-author of the furlough j requirements in .1 speed lest over ill IpnHpv of (hr. fiirhi !l nvc-milc course from I'ui-t My- Many at discrimination a- gain.st Cil'ii. since officers have been receiving their terminal pay in cnsh. Rep. Dwight L. Rogers CD- pay bill and leader of the fight, that brought it to its firs', vote- in the house last June II, an- nounced he would introduce on the -firslrlny nf the new congi-oss a bill to allow tin; bonds to be converted into wish iinmctliately. Tutal Cost Unknown No ono known exactly how much llm legislation will' cost. However, Rep. Thompson (D- Tex) who helped write the com- promise after the senate rejected the house straight cash plan, es- timated the sum at about V-J day tuned engines for sky re- views over many of the principal cities of the United Stales'. T h i r t. y superfortresses were ordered uiit from their Ok- innwa for another flight over the wartime Inrgi'l cities of T o I; y o, Yokohama. Hiroshima and Osaka this time without bombs. President Truman .ii.-cepted an invitation lo n dinner here at which General Carl Spaalx, air force commander, was host. A tel.egram from Orvillc Wright, the pioneer aviator who with his brother Wilbur built the nrniy's among by the air' forces. "Probably no military organization ever had a sm.'iller beginning or a more rap- id he.1 .snici. The air forces, then the aero- division of the corps, was ;i year old when Wright with LL Benjamin D. Fouloi.s (if the army MS :i passen- ger, successfully met Die army's first aircraft, stood out coiiRr.'i tula linns received 000.000. All enlisted personnel who i WASHINGTON, Aug. 1- have served at; any time since September 8, in the army, the navy, the const guard or the j marine corps would receive the -Asked whether he favored the paymenls pl.ovidcd they had ;ic- renommntwn of tm'louRh time at the time of their discharge. Payments would be at the rate of two and one-half days a month, less furlough time actual- lar President Tru- man replied today that he was not in Tennessee politics. Mr. Truman told his news con- i .u i cua- fcrence his only further reply ,y ,.eceivecl. But no one could be was, no comment iDaid fo u d much he My. or to Alexandria, and return. Then, with Lt. Frank P. Lahm as n pussenKc.'r. he set n world's enclurunee rei-onl of one hour Jintl in the air. It. wns the first IJ. S. military plane. They have ceased irying now to see how long plimcs can be kept aloft but. speed haw been stepped up to around miles an hour for tho new P-HO jet.-pro- pelled Lightning fighter. Tests are due lo start this month on a small experimental XS-1 craft at .Muroc nir base, Californin, which is expected ultimately to reach miles an hour nt feet. And the rocket era is just dawn- ing. had accrued. Mr. Truman steered clear of other political questions, even those relating 'to his home state of Missouri. Truman will fly to Inde- pendence, Mo., Saturday to vote in the Missouri Democratic pri- mary of next Tuesday. Asked what he had learned about the Missouri .political sit- uation, the president said not a word and then added no com- ment. In a previous news confer- ence he expressed opposition to the renomination of Rep. Slaugh- ter (D.-Mo.) represents the district adjoining his own. Two No Accidents Here Police officials Thursday morning reported two arrests for Wednesday. No accidents ,or other misde- j n'c'w cropRotin mcanors wore reported, making :t a little on the quiet side at po- Better returns for amount in- Upswing In Prices Paid Stale Farmers OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. period ended reflected sharp upswing in prices paid Oklahoma farmers for their principal crops. F e d e r n I Statistician K. D. Blood said that during two weeks of the poripd in which there was no price control corn prices climbed 21. cents a bushel, rye cents, barley 12 cents, wheat II cents, and grain sorghums 45 cents a hundredweight. Cotton also climbed four cents a pound to a high of cents. Chicken and egg prices remain- ed relatively stable, Blood said, and hay declined slightly as the hm-vesting and marketing of the ice headquarters. i veiled. Ada News Want Ads. Oklahoma (ily Gels District (AA Office FORT WOHTH. Tex., Aug. City is the loca- tion of one. of six district civil aeronautics administration offices established to handle de- tails of the now natioiuil airports building program. Regional. CAA Administrator li. E. Elliott announced here that W. O. K.-irpenko would be acting district engineer of Ihc Oklahoma City offiec which will .serve the Oklahoma district. The new district offices, Elliott, said, will undertake a detailed study in their districts of feasible airport sites which would come within the scope of the national airport program working in co- ordination with slate aviation of- ficials. Thereafter the.y will be- gin i-eeeivinj', applications from cities seeking to build airports with federal aid under provisions of the program and these will be checked in detail before they are submitted to Washington 'with recommendations. Uncle Sam estimates the area planted to cotton at 000 acres. Thai's soft pic-kin' fur u lot of. people. Con Be Decided by 'Simple Mojorify; Major Dcciliont On tatit ity A. i. PARIS. Aug. Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov HKi-eird todny lo :i CiriK-k proposal 1.) open the Paris peace confer- ence lo till "questions purtainins lo the draft of peace treaties." In supporting Inn Greek mo- lion, Molotov proposed that the rules of procedure of the confer- ence be amended to include the statement that: "Tho conference may place on its agenda at the request of any delegale any question pertaining lo the of peace treaties." The motion was made by Con- stantin Aghnidcs, Greek ambas- sador to London, who said that the conference should be thrown i open to any "connected" peace question not now on the agenda. Before Molotov spoke the motion wns opposed by Mosha Pljadi, Yugoslav official, and Dmitri Z, Mimuilsky, member of the Ukra- inian delegation, who said thu proposal was n 'disguised form' of bringing up disputed ques- tion of a simple majority as ,-igaiiiKt n two-thirds majority i-ulo for voting in the conference. The Gn.'ek proposal nsked thnt the decision of placing any new matter on the agenda be by a simple: majority Kvalt, Mnnnllsky Differ M.'inuilsky said nrticln 18 the United Nations charter re- quired n majority for voting. Dr. Herbert V. Evatt, Australian minister of external affairs and champion of the sim- ple majority proposal. Manuilsky's interpretation of the U. R. article wns faulty. "This is only a recommending body and 1 think it should con- sider everything and send it back lo the final four min- SJiid Kvntt. The adoption of tho two-third.t rule seemed assured, however, thus probnbly restricting the major derisions of the 21-nation body, to those matters on which the Hig Kour have been unable to agree. The debate on the question of opening the conference to va- rious ponce treaty questions oc- curred at a meeting of the rules committee. U. S. Secretary of Stale James F. Byrnes was ex- pected to inform the committee that, the United Slates gave qual- ified support to the two-thirds proposal. Atmosphere Harmonious Molotov's amendment permit- ting the conference, to discuss all questions pertaining to the peace treaties was adopted in a har- monious atmosphere. A Netherlands proposal that each country be admitted on an equal fooling to all conference committees was defeated, 11 to 9, in the first public roll call in 'ho rules rommiltoo. The United abstained. Russia, Y u o M I u v i n, Poland. the Ukrnino. White Russia. Kranee, Britain. India, Norway and New Zealand voted "nay." Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Ethiopia, Greece, the Netherlands, South Africa and Australia voted "yes." The British, in opposing the Dutch proposal, said the rights of. ever.y nation would be safeguard- ed by final consideration of every resolution on the general session floor. The French said having nil committees composed of dele- gates from all 21 nations would 1 too cumbersome. Meanwhile, an Australian source said that delegation might question Soviet Russia's claim to reparations as writlen into the present drafts. The Australian source said (Continued on Page 2, Col. 2) TH' PESSIMIST Th' feller who's sUirtin' on 'is vacation at o'clock in Hi' afternoon might as o' started early that mornin" as for Join' any work is concerned. If you can't say no, you .lost hnvu t' 'lh' conse- quences.   

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