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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 30, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 30, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Picking up a 'coffee check' at a restaurant is a casual matter, but it's proving not casual for Rep. Coffee that he picked up a check for services to a wartime defense industrialist. Ai f rij-p Net June I'.iUI Clrctilntlon 8310 Member: Audn Hurra.> of circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Agreemenl To Marines Fight Way Out of Big Allow Action Ambush Attack in North China On Major Bills Ronkin-Marcontonio Con- troversy Set Aside to Let Major Measures Come To Vote By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST 'WASHINGTON, July 30, i.-li- Rtps. Rankin (D-Miss) and Mar- cantonio (Amn Lab-NY) laid n- sise temporarily today their con- troversy over ;i contempt citation that had threatened to stop the house legislative machinery. Indications were they wouldn't renew it until the house has act- ed on several major bills await- :ne consideration. Rankin did not carry out his earlier threat to insist on imme- diate consideration of tho con- tempt action againsl George chairman of the nation- al federation for constitutionnl j-.ocrtics, New York. This made it oossible for the house to be- gin debate on a deficiency ap- propriation bill. Exchange Heated Remarks A brief but heated exchange occurred before Marcantonio and Rankin quit_ scrapping. Marcantonio assailed ns "a sham" what he said were, efforts to claim that his opposition to the contempt action was aimed a.: halting a bill to provide auto- mobiles for amputee veterans. Marcantonio forced numerous Quorum calls yesterday to block the contempt resolution. who is trying to play politics with these boys bet- ter the New Yorker said, referring to the legless veterans sitting in the gallery. Rankin countered with the as- sertion the issue is whether "communism or a free govern- ment under Christian civilization" shail prevail in this country. The contempt and proceedings, he s.aid. are aimed at "a group of i-orr.munists" and "subversive in- dividuals" and attempts to block tnem are ''dangerous to American security." Originated A Committee The contempt case originated with the house committee on un- American activities, of which I Rankin is acting chairman. Major legislation which had been backed up behind Marcan- filibustering tactic of de- manding quorum calls included: 1. A conference committee re- port providing a compromise- on the GI terminal leave pay bill. 2. The deficiency appropriation measure which included S2.500 OOC.OOO for the terminal leave pay ind for OPA. 3. Legislation authorizing the veterans administration to specially equipped au- tomobiles to legless war veter- ans. 4. A conference report on railroad reorganization le'gisla-, c. A conference report on a five-year federal- aid hospital construction pro- gram. There was a possibility too thai tne bill freezing social security taxes at their present level might ret caught in the jam. It has sassed the house and is scheduled for a sena'e vote today, but sen- ate changes could return it to tne house. Unless the measure passes social security taxes will .r-rr.D from one to two and one- r.alf tier cent on both employers and employes January _ Depends On Two Men Whether any of those measures. Bolivian President Hung The body of President Cualberto Villarroel hangs in the public square outside the Bolivian presidential palace, in La'Paz, Bo- livia, after the brief, but bloody revolt overthrew the government .IllKr 11 I A July New Price Board Meets to Take Up Former OPA Powers By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITH WASHINGTON, July of..the new price de- control board held a "get ac- quainted" meeting today prior to starting on the big job con- i gross assigned them. The three-man board is made up of Chairman Roy L. Thomp- son. Daniel W. Bell and George II. Mead. They met for an hour Gibson and Thompson said afterward tured of Fugitive Gives Up; Sat in Tree And Watched Searchers OKEMAH, Okla., July five days of freedom, during which -time he was so close IrfposKemen he "could hnve spit on Woodrow Gibson, 24, surrendered to Okfuskee county officers late yesterday and' was to be returned, today to the slate'penitentiary at' McAles- Four Yanks Killed And 19 Wounded In Convoy Attack Attackers Struck Suddenly, Wearing Uniforms of Chinese Communists By TOM MASTEBSON PEIPING, July hundred Chinese, some wearing the bluish green uniforms of communists, killed at least four U. S. marines and wounded 19 others with automatic weapons, rifles and grenades during a vio- lent four-hour attack on a truck convoy of 100 leathernecks, eye- witnesses related today. A search if being made for oth- er marines, believed to be still missing. The attackers, lying in ambush in cornfields 35 miles southeast of Peiping, would have wiped out the convoy had the marines not elected to jump back in the trucks and roar away under fire, the witnesses said. Chinese Red Blames Marines (In Nanking, Chou En-Lai, chief communist negotiator in ef- forts to settle China's fratricidal strife, expressed belief that the clash resulted from marine prov- ocation of communist forces dur- ing the last three weeks and add- ed that "communists have abso- lutely no intention of unleashing communists have a conflict." (He said been provoked by marine intru- sions into their areas.) Maj. Fred J. Frees, of Sioux Falls, S. D., who was with the convoy of replacements bound for Peiping from Tientsin, said Contractor Says He Paid For Services Made Deal with Rep. Cof- fee in 1941, Check Wasn't Campaign Contribution By JOHN W. HENDERSON WASHINGTON, July 30, Eivind Anderson, Tacoma, Wash., contractor, teslified today that he gave in 1941 to the secre- tary of Rep. John Coffee CD- Wash) "because of the service I expected to get" from Coffee in the capital. Anderson denied at the same time that he had paid for "in- fluence" or had any thought of making, a campaign contribution. Coffee has called the a campaign contribution. Anderson told the senate war investigating committee that he did not know whether Coffee re- ceived any of the money and had not interested himself in that question. "Didn't you Sen- ator Connally (D-Tex) of the committee, "that it was a viola- tion of law to give him a check for services of that Didn't Know Violated Law Anderson replied in the nega- tive. Anderson said the first time that he knew there was anything "irregular" about the transaction was late in 1944 when he was told that it was "against public policy to pay such money." "I did not know it was a crime to do what I he told the committee. Connally, labeling as "in- fluence" the services which An- derson said he had sought to pay for, declared thai "if you did lhat you were violating a criminal law." "You could be he U. S. Will Stand By Conference Decisions TROUBLE BUBBLES IN THE EAST the attack erupted "like an the witness, "and in my plosion." "They threw everything at us during the first hour of attack except the kitchen chimed in Sgt. James West, of Cincin- nati. Frees and West, both army ter. "it was just a get acquainted meeting." Thompson planned to confer and scores of minor bills, will be considered at all in '.he house between now and final adjourn- ment depends largely on Rankin and Marcantonio. The disputed resolution, asking tne house to recommend con- tempt action against George Mar shall. chairman of the nationa federation of constitutional l lib- New York, is ;i matter of privilege and takes prece- dence c.vt-r anything else in the house. Rankjn can call it up uny wilh Presidonl Truman during the afternoon and then get to- gether with his colleagues to be sworn in to office. Roy L. Thompson, designated as chairman by President Tru- man, planned as Ihe firsl step a "get acquainted" meeting with his new colleagues, Daniel W. Bell and George H. Mead. Taking over power lhat form- erly was OPA's exclusively, board is faced 'big assignment: A decision by August 20 wheth- er price ceilings should be restor- ed on meats, dairy products, grains, cotton seed, soybeans and hundreds of products made from those items. If the board fails to act by that time, ceilings automatically will be re-established. Before any decision on this, Ihe board is required to hold pub- lic hc'.-.rings so consumer groups ind industry representatives can their views. situation is   which swept through a downtown hotel early today kill- ed four firemen before it was brought under coritrol in a three- hour battle by a large concentra- tion of equipment and men. Greater relurns for amount inL Vested. Ada News Want Ads. opinion you ought to be indict- ed." Felt Government Obligated Anderson told the commitlee that "the purpose of giving this money was not to influence any- one in the war department or anyone in the government to give me something that the govern- ment was not obligated to give me under this contract." His reference was to Ihe award of a war deparlment hospital contract. Anderson testified that ar- rangements for turning over the check were made in a "lonesoine corridor" on the house side of the capitpl building. He related his version of a conversation, which occurred, he said, after a lunch which follow- ed a visi twhich he and Paul A. Olson, then Coffee's secretary, had made to the war department. He said he received "encourage- ment" there that he would be awarded a contract. Talk Brief And To Foint The conversation was "very Anderson said. He quoted Coffee as saying that "I understand from Paul that you will pay for us to represent you in Washington." Anderson testified he agreed, "I will be willing to pay .to have representation in Washington: That will be all right with me." Anderson said his answer ap- peared "gratifying to and quoted Coffee as saying "if you do that, you can depend up- on us to look after your in- terests." High officials of the war and justice department and a former senator were listed among pros- pective witnesses as the commit- tee turned temporarily from its probe into the Garsson Munitions combine. As it entered the new field of inquiry, the committee learned that President Truman had granted its request for authority to inspect income, excess profits and other tax returns. The body did not disclose whose returns are to be examined, beyond a statement by Chairman Mead (D- Ky) that they would be persons associated with the Garsson en- terprises. May Illness Sidetracks Probe That inquiry has been tempor- British officials, blow, up David Hotel, killing over 50. threaten direct action unless British subdue terrorists. ope for General oce mission dims ns undeclared civil war of Communists on. Notionalists jrowj in scope. "ENCH IN DO- CHINA forced Vichy regime lo cede to Siam is reclaimed by France, Icadmg to border clashes. Siam appeals to to settle the dispute. From to fhrcc million bellioui Hukbolohops defy Monilo govern- ment. Almost entire notionol guard used 1o rout them from moun- tain strongholds, arily sidetracked due to the ill- ness of Rep. May whom the committee is wailing lo ques- tion regarding his relations with the combine and its promoters, including Henry and Murray Garsson. May's physician has re- ported him suffering from a chronic heart condition, recently aggravated. Coffee entered the investiga- tion picture at his own request after Senator Bi-ewster (R-Me) submitted evidence that the Washington legislator received a check from a Tacoma de- fense contractor in 1941. Coffee Explains Check Coffee has acknowledged the Tel Aviv Residents Must Stay Inside, Away from Windows By CARTER L. DAVIDSON JERUSALEM, July 30, British troops placed the residents the all-Jewish city of the Aviv under virtual house arrest at dawn today as they opened a prolonged and deliber- ate roundup aimed at finding the persons who bombed the King David hotel in Jerusalem last week. The entire city was placed un- der a 22-hour-a-day curfew, with residents forbidden, under pain of being shot on sight, to leave their homes except during nn authorized two-hour period for purchasing food and other sup- plies. Recover 87 Bodies Lt. Gen. Sir Alan Cunningham, British high commissioner for the troubled Holy Land, said the British had "clear evidence of the existence of terrorists in Tel Aviv and that some if not all.of those who look part in the Jer- usalem crime from that town." Eighty-seven bodies have been recovered from the bombed hotel and 24 persons are missing. A high-ranking officer in Jer- usalem said the world's only all-Jewish city probably would 3e under the rigid curfew for several days while soldiers and Palestine police carried on the steady house-to-house search, which officials predicted would result in the arrest of to 000 men and women. Is Ghost Town Now Seven-Degree Drop In Temperature Is Welcomed Here The government thermometer at the Ada Greenhouse register- ed 98 degrees Monday, a pleas- ant relief from Saturday's J04 and Sunday's 105. Although it was still hot, the seven degree drop was appreci- ated generally. The Associated Press weather forecast says generally to- day, tonight and Wednesday with continued heat. Rain is forecast for the panhandle but none for Ada. Adans slept more rcstfullv Monday night with the mercury at 74 degrees than they did with Sunday's 80 and as a result many of them felt more like putting in a day's work Tuesday. BOVTSTATE CANCELLED OKLAHOMA CITY, July 30. State American Legion Commander Gnmville Scanlanc announced today the annual Le- gion sponsored Boys Stale sched- uled to start at Sulphur Satur- day had been cancelled because of the illness from polio of Helen Gough, daughter of the superin- tendent of the Oklahoma School for the deaf. The meeting was lo have been held at the school. Scanland suid he cancelled the The searchers also were believ- Slate afler conferring wilh Di- ed lo be seeking arms caches and clandestine radio transmitlers operated by such Jewish under- ground organizations as Irgun Zvai Leumi and the Stern gang, whose members, an army officer sajd, were the principal objects of the roundup. It was the second time month lhat Ihe city had been placed under rigid curfew reslri- tions. turning the normally bust- ling city into a ghost town. A month ago Jewish institutions in Tel Aviv were occupied and searched and the residents of the city were held under curfew for 24 hours. Under the terms of the present crufew the residents are not per- mitted to go near their windows nor on their balconies and must stay inside their homes despite the sweltering heat on the coastal plain. The Tel Aviv beach, usu- ally teeming with thousands seeking relief; from the heat, was deserted. JAPS BLAMED FOR SOME OF WORST ATROCITIES HANGED SINGAPORE, July Nine Japanese war criminals were hanged today at Changi jail while a number of formed allied prisoners of war, who had tesli- fforts constituent over a period of years. Meanwhile. Chairman Mead announced thut Ihe committee had added another investigation to its- growing list. This is an in- quiry into a report by Senator Ferguson (R-Mich) concerning the storage, "at great expense and over a. long period of of boxes in a war assets administratin warehouse in De- troit, when the contents were not known. a'Shiro nicknamed the The News Classified Ads. "Frog" and the "Undertaker" by prisoners who testified thut u y jftuiiui i wj.u LCSLJ Lieu mm they were responsible for some T of the worst atrocities in Burma f'ed ?mj wj L. E. Emanuel, Chickasha, de- partment sin-Bean, and Dr. Grady Mathews, state health director. -Ag ______j Adans Graduating From O.U. Tonight Oklahoma university Tuesday night graduated a large .summer class. Among those receiving de- grees were: ADA Edyth Louise Dand- ridge. B.A.; Doreen George, mas- ler of education; June Jeter, B.A. in library science; Patricia Ruth Jeter, B.A., nncl Sarah Elizabeth McOoary, master of education. Output of Mens Shirts to Gain NEW YORK, July M. J. Lovell, director of the Na- tional Association of shirt and pajamn manufacturers, said to- day outpul of nien's shirts could be expected to increase somewhat as a result of the 11. per cenl ad- vance in retail ceiling prices granted yesterday by the office of price administration. "If the order says, as reported, that the industry may base ils prices on curruni labor and ,thcl? not and Siam. The other seven were convicted of atrocities in the An- daman Islands. PICHER, Okla., July Newbury has been elect- ed superintendenl schools here, succeeding R. Bj Johnson, who resigned. nrjr ther increases." said. He added lhat elimination of Ihe maximum average price plan is a grealor incentive to the in- dustry than the new pricing, be- cause it permits use of matcrinls which shirt-makers were unable to use under the MAP. The price increase, he said, amounts to only about 5 per cent Read The News Classified Ads. at the manufacturing level. Byrnes Makes Open Pledge Even If Decision Against Ministers' Agreements; Meetings May Be Open PARIS, July S. Secretary of State Byrnes told the Paris peace conference today the United States would stand by the conferences' recommenda- tions in event it opposes by a two-thirds majority any of the peace treaties drafted by the for- eign ministers council. Byrnes spoke in the general assembly of the conference short- 1 ly after the rules committee had proposed unanimously that all committee meetings and general conference sessions bo thrown open to the press of the a step toward the Wilsonian ideal of a generation ago of "open covenants openly arrived at." Soviet Foreign Minister Molo- tov was not present in the hall when Byrnes made his speech, an answer to French President Bi- dault's inaugural address of yes- terday. The Russian delegation, which has insistcr upon unani- mity of the four principal powers on recommendations to the peace conference, was headed by the Vice Foreign Minister, Andrei Vishinsky at the moment. "The United Stales will stand by its agreements in the council of foreign Byrnes said. "But if the conference should, by a vote of the governments here represen- ted, make n contrary recommen- dation, the United Status will use its influence to secure the adop- tion of that recommendation by the council." Lesson On Democracy Beginning his short speech with an object lesson on democ- racy, Byrnas said: "Democracy cannot be imposed or taught at the point of a bay- onet. As terror inspires terror, so good will can inspire good will." The rules commiitce recom- mendation on freedom of the press to the peace conference was scheduled to be ncled upon by the general assembly later today. Secretary Byrnes had sponsored the move. Byrnes was loudly applauded when he said. "However difficult may be the paths of international cooperation, the United States is determined not to return to a policy of isolation." The secretary of slate said the United Slates insisted that "those who fought the war should make the peace." "1 hope thai Ihe delegates will feel free to express the views of their respective states on the pro- posed he added. "No nation, large or small, can be in- sensitive to world opinion." The committee vole on freedom of the press to all conference pro- ceedings was tanlamount to its acceptance by the general as- sembly. Since all 21 nations attending the conference are represented on the rules committee, the com- mittee vote was tanlamount to acceptance in the general assem- bly. Adoption will mean that all committee meetings, where de- tails of various clauses in indi- vidual treaties are to be debated, can be reported fully to the world. Five Major Committees There- are five committees in all, including the rules commit- tee. Tho others are llio economic commission for the Balkiins, the economic commission for Italy, the legal and draftinR committee ami Die credentials committees. In addition there is a subcom- jnission for each of Ihe five de- feated nations involved in the treaties, Italy, Romaniq, Hun- gary, Bulgaria and Finl.-ind. Byrnes led the fight for free- dom of information from the first. An American source i.iid (ContinuiM on Page 2, Column 3) TH' 1 PESSIMIST Ther' ain't but two ways f slop bootleggin' in a "dry" slate either has t.' legalize th' xnl. o' liquor er folks have t' quit drinkin' it. Another drawback t' hot summer feller's pants allus look like he wuz tixin' t' jump.   

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