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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 29, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 29, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             lots or he couldn't hove of the same time chairmaned an important wartime committee and seen to so many favors for so many different Arrianc NM .Hint I'nld flriMilnlloh 8310 ilrmlirr: Hurran ul Clri'iiliuluii THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION l.'ird 88 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JULY 29, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPV 21-NATION PEACE CONFERENCE CONVENES Heal Reaches 105 Degrees Here Sunday Ho Relief in Sight; Some Ronehcs Hove Already Had Big Failure Fires Ice Plants Doing Best Producing More Than 'Ca- pacity' But Demand Still Exceeds Supply WAS the huttrst day this year, thiil is. unless today thermometer an- other notch i.r two. Anil few win would lie .'.in prised i thai happens. Tin- mi n-ui-y n-gis-tercd de- c.-'.-o, higher than Saturday's then Inch in.-irl; of KM. Snndav low brought The niiiiiiiiiuii M decrees ;ind not until the hour.-, of nmrning was there foulness In permit nnv fitful sleep. Tarly Sunday I'romiso i-'adrd Sunday morning hiidn't been Thundi-r.'.lmwrry looking lo-.id1. find eoohni; Iliiil t'liiycd around until 1 I o'clock thai the day Wouldn't ;is bad us Saturday, bill Ihe nnil faded and the v..n b.-ai down with the ferocity the i. expecting linlil rains oine H'.'.v J ranch nraV Hickory about (ill acres burn- ed over liite last Week titnl l''l'ed i-iinch is reported to have ;in even wider spread brfoM- the fire was extinguished. DDT Sprn.vfr Called On fluxion's Kiineh sent to Olil.'i- l.t.ima City Saturday for 11 fiOO- callc.n Link, hiiviiiu found that the l.'id-ualloii (unit already avail- able didn't hold 'enough water for n pasture blaze that had ropuilcfl thiit one ranch I.Ji- fichlini: even put to their OUT sprayer to help :-ti'p :.pi fading Tiie iro .situation nere is 'slrin- and in manv oilier commun- ities severe shortages are report- despite day and night produc- of all plants in the area. Not only is there n drought in Ihe weather in Ponloloe county hut. now then- is a drought in re- tail ice, The three Ada ice plants have a ''capacity" of DO Ions of ice ;i dny and arc produc- ing 101 tons daily. One plunt sells no ico lit all over it's clock and the other two sell only a part of I heirs by this method. j The managers explain that Ada and the area Ada nerves isn't as hail off as a number of other southern Oklahoma communities, and say that (hero is enough ice tor essential uses. They ask the public to use on- ly what ice is necessary, to know that. Ihe supply is being spread on a prorata basis, (hat milk sup- plies are being taken care of ns an essential food source, and that regular customers commercial and each gelling their share. 'he Ten company lias a capacity of tons of ic'c daily is milking Of the iee produced, about tons arc sold over the dock, In three onc- one-half hour periods daily. The periods are morning, noon and night when ice is available. The other 17 tons of ico go on the trucks lo regular customers and one out of town delivery is made, to Stonewall. Southern Ico reports Hint it's machine has a maximum capacity of tons of ice daily and it is making HR. None of the South- Stonewall Girl Victim Of Car Crash One of Four Killed At Oklahoma City; Weekend Coiti 10 Lives in State Mascot of Seabees Admits He's 'Wolf Plucky Lod in Hosptal Stays Cheerful, Is 'Sorta Sweet' On Nurse July 20. Little Jimmy Carru-k, the mascot of the navy Sea- admits he may be "a' wolf" The Pittsburgh (Pa) youngster strapped to a lied in the Shriner's for crippled children, celebrated his ninth birthday yesk-rday by telling his mother j I he was "sol (a sweet on one of1'1 t.i" nurses here." Then he smiled happily. "But don't tell anyone: They'll lliink I'm a wolf" son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis hasn't been able uall; mice he was two years At thai time he was stricken wuh tuberculosis of the spine. The I' S navy didn't forget .limmir's birthday and neither ti.d the hospital. The Seabees. who named the vi'-.ingvter official mascot in ISM-I. M-nt him a lli-meh model of n tuji earner. The hospital Ktivo him "all the ice cream I if'uul eat." "The Seabecs are a grand nuneh of Mrs. Carrick and 1 can't say enouch for '.he Shriner? who heloed Jimmy into this hospital." "Jimmy's awfully happy here fna 1 ju-.t that IheV'll be (Continued on Page 2 Col, 1) Two Ada Racers To Be in Cushing Race For Experience Two Ada soap box racers will be loaded onto a truck Tuesday morning for a trip to Cushing to participate in a Soap Box Der- by race there, but the lociil rac- ers will not have a chance to take honors ns the owners will be for experience only. A racer owned by Perry Don McUroom and sponsored by Free- man-Thrash Motor company will race m Class A. U wns (he light blue job that took second place honors in Clmi.'i A in the Adii race. The racer was third in the enlire event, but had the second fastest heat time. The second plnco winner here is owned by l-Iarn-l Spoons and will race the second plueo winner at Cushing. His racer is spon- sored bv Bloke Coca-Cola. Spoons won Class B division hero and also hud the best designed racer, Cushing has 14 racers ready for the rfice there and preliminary and trial runs have been com- pleted. The official running of the race will be at p.m Tuesday. A number of Ada people have made plans to attend the Cush- ing race and a few of that num- ber are planning to attend the national event at. Akron, Ohio. ll.v Tile AK.snHMUid I'riiiss Ten persons died over the weekend in Okliihoma of injuries received in in traffic mishaps, one. in an air- plane crash and another when a shotgun was accidentally dis- charged. Many others were in hospitals. The highway pntrol reported i tin; traffic deaths brought the month's total lo 37, fourteen more than for the same period lost year and the year's mtirlc to ueain.il. at this time in JO-lfi, Qlliain PIII.I) Trawel, '12, Chiek- nslin, died in n Chicknshn hos- pllnl lout night of injuries receiv- ed when he was struck by a scooter. A .car carrying seven persons overturned on the outskirts of Oklahoma City early Sunday, killing four persons. Thu dead were; Carrie Elbert O'Neal, Jr., 21, Ivn McEwen, .18, and Marie Elizabeth Linclgren, 39, all of Oklahoma City, and Zorah Lee Gates, IS, Stonewall, Okla. (Zora Lee Gates was a daugh- ter of R. C, Gates. Slonewiill; fu- neral services will be held Tues- al. I I a.m. from Onlc Avenue Bap- I list church in Ada, burial in I'innedrito eornolory; other mirvlv- orn are three sisters, Mrs. Aretta Chronislor and Oxcttu May Gates of Fillstown and Mrs. Lucilc Gentry of Oklnhoma City; grand- Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Gates of Stonewall and Mr. and 'Mrs. G. P. Vineyard of Noconn, Tex. Driver May Die The driver of the car, James Ed word Nelson, 20, also of Okla- homa City, was in a critical con- dition in an Oklahoma Cily hos- pital. 'The two others escaped with minor hurts. Finis Marion Layton, 54, Ber- nice, Okln., was struck and killed two miles south of Grove Sunday when he stepped in front of an automobile. A truck-automobile collision near Slilwcll Saturday resulted in the death of Dun ThuVman De Vaughn, 30, Sallisaw city police- man. ,lone Hay, Stilwell, was critically injured and taken to a Prairie Grove, Ark., hospital Two others in the car suffered less serious Injuries. While playing in a driveway Saturday in Oklahoma City, two- year old Marsha Lee Reise Byrnes Leaves for Paris Conference President Tjumnn in his car, foreground, stops to pick up Secre- tory of State James Byrnes, Senator Tom Conally and Senator Arthur Vnndenberg who are descending the steps of the Stale Department in that order between a guard of honor. Truman will accompany them to the .National Airport ir. Washington, where Byrnes will leave by plane for the 21-nation conference in Paris (NEA daughter of Mrs. Imogene Reise' was struck and killed bv an fioln- mobije. and killed by an auto- lane Crash Kills One Brice Thompson, Song Leader, Dies Ada Man Devoted Most Of Lfc to Teaching, Encour- agement of Singing Miinelhing lor him, t.ru.-L -.aid. Tin- Minify fllV r-l.ickv iiml arrived a month certain thai iMirinc-rs' hospital will hi-ln him walk ai'.ain. "They other kids walk, sii why can't Ihey make me c.Ik'.'" "He's always had a simnv dis- position." Mrs. (.'an id; asserts. going In have lo remain on bod for rcvoral months yd T :iri Lie placed in a cast. Hut will be worth JiTly G.'irold 1 liilsliiu-. associate pro- Jcs.-or of education at the Uni- vcrMtv of Oklahoma, has been director of the university laboratory schools effective Sept. 1. The B.-htiols. including the nur- sery, kindergarten, olcmciilarv, j .limit.r an'1 senior high, will lie iirnvod In the north campus. icliirns for amotml Head Ada News Want WEATHER Oklahoma: Generally fair lo- nieht and Tuesday except scat- teiod thunder showers along fiiMiTii border tonight: not much change -n 'temperature: highest 100 most of state. L. B. (Brice) Thompson, who Itlied at his home. 729 South I Turner, Saturday, will be greatly 111 I d IlirougllOut PonlOloc counly bv singers and soiig-lov- people, .lie had priu-ticallv dedicated his life to the development of .singing and (caching of others in singing of religious songs. He has conducled schools In Okla- homa ,-md also in Tennessee, from which stale he moved with his family to Ada in .1920. Horn in Puiman counly, Ten- nessee, in he was married tu Miss M.-irthn Jtu-ed in .1097. i Kight children wore born lo jlht'iii, throe daughters and five I sons. All of liie children .'followed their father's path in boosting community singing pro- grams. Funeral services were held Monday at -I p. m. from the Ada Missionary Baptist church, with burial in Rosodale cemetery. i _ Oakman Community Meeting Wednesday There will be a mass meeting uf the Uakman church at the school lumse at fl p.m. Wednes- day, at which time a plan will be devised whereby the church building will be completed. There will be community sing- mi: with visiting from Ada and surrounding communi- ties. Oakman community residents are urged lo attend 'and others are welcome1. A 17-year-old Oklahoma Cily boy, William Fred Kelley, died Sunday of injuries suffered when his tented light plane crashed near Calvin in Hughes county. In a critical condition in a Hol'don- villo hospital W.MS his companion, Owen 1C, Kdmisten, 17, Oklahoma City. Amos Ray Shreiner, 44, Beth- any, was killed when his shot- gun accidentally discharged as he prepared to leave on n hunt- ing trip Saturday, Explosion'Blows Woman to Bits Husband Must Explain Warningt Againit Tamper- ing with Trunk f PORTLAND, July xi'iuiU trunk bucame'the 'cen- ter of investigation today of an explosion which blew Mrs. James W. Borclen lo bits while she alone In her home here. Cily Detective Bard Purcell re Dcrlcd Bowdcn, charged with il- legal Dossnssion explosives and hcfcl without bail, has denied owning explosives or any know- ledge of how his wife was killed Saturday night, Purcell said Iho explosion is have believed to have originated in a 'toot .looker" that Bowden's two daughters, Doris, 13, and Shirley. .17. told him was kept padlocked in the cellar. Both girls reported their fath- er repeatedly warned the family not lo lumper with Ihe trunk or try to open it, the detective said. Collon Meet Being Called Farmers May Be Asked To Hold Entire '46 Crop Off Market; Price Dropping Senate Plans Quick Action On Approving OPA Decon- trol Board So It Can Get On Big Job in Hurry By MARVIN L. ARBOVVSMITH WASHINGTON. July senate banking committee ATLANTA, July State agriculture Commissioner Tom Linde'r said today a meet- ___ ing would be held here next Men-11 o cl a y unanimously approved day to ask cotton farmers to with- President Truman's three nom- hold their entire J.IMG crop from the market. At the sumo time, Linder charged the department of agri- culture nr.d the department ol! slate were withholding export in- formation from the farmers in an i was it-Run Accident Saturday Night A hit and run naeldent occur- red Saturday night one and one half miles north of- Ada on SH R3 at about p.m. A car driven by Lester Myers of By- ars struck a ear driven by J. W. Law of Ada and did not stop but kcot going, patrolmen reported. Myers was later apprehended by Patrolmen Glenn Clark, and Harvey Hawkins and placed un- der arrest. effort, lo drive down the price of cotton. He also expressed the belief that the present OPA Jaw is un- constitutional, Thomas lo Take Part Linder said he and J. C. Mc- Donald, Texas commissioner of agriculture, had called the meel- ng and that Senator Thomas (D- chairman of the senate tgriculture committee, had igrced to be present. The Georgia commissioner added Hint senators, congressmen and commissioners of agriculture from all cotton growing states hnd 'been asked to 'attend." Linder said also that Thomus had agreed to summon represen- tatives from the departments of agriculture nnd stale before the senate committee to "explain why information vital to cotton has been withekl.' OPA Restoration Costs Farmers Hesl.oral.iori of OPA, said Lin- der, has cost Ihe cotton farmer to date. Since con- I gross passed the new law, he ex- plained, the price of cotton has dropped the legal maximum of .100 points on the cotton exchange each c'lny. This, he continued, means'" that the price per bale has dropped He added that, effective to- day the maximum fluctuation under the law becomes '200 points. This year's cotton crop is esti- mated at approximately bales. Jn'a telegram lo Thomas, Lin- der said he had information, that the departments of agriculture and state had a backlog of orders for colton in excess of bales and that the orders should be placed prior to August 1. Reckless Driving Charged to Myers inucs for the new price decontrol board, The commit tee's action sent to the senate for its consideration, possibly today but more likely tomorrow, these nominations: Roy L. Thompson, president of Reckless driving charges were filed against 'Lester -Myers Mon- day morning by County Attorney Tom D. Mc'Kpown after a com- plaint was signed by .Highway Patrolman Glenn Clurk. Myers is alleged to have driven a 1939 Ford from an unknown point to n point; about one mile north of Ada without clue regard to trnfflt! existing there, The case was filed in the Per- cy Armstrong .justice of court. the Federal Land Bank of New Orleans, as chairman of the de- control board; Daniel W. Boll, former treasury undersecretary, and George H, Mead, O., paper company executive, as members. Meanwhile, Mr. Truman ar- ranged lo confer (at p.m. eastern standard time) with Mend, Presidential Press Secre- tary Charles G. Ross told report- ers. Three Nominees Willing Ross added, in response to questions, that all throe nominees have told Mr. Truman they will accept the appointments, Thompson, president of the Federal Land Bank of New Or- leans, said he expected lo leave today for the capital "to get things lined up nncl ready to go at the earliest possible lime." The board's first big assign- ment is to decide by Au'gusl "20 whether meals, dairy products, grains, cotton seed, soybeans and hundreds of. products made from them should be placed back un- der price controls at that time. If it makes no decision, ceilings automatically will be restored. Under terms of the OPA revi- val act, the board must hold pub- lice hearings before it makes any ruling on thcas commodities. The purpose of this is lo obtain the views of consumer groups and in- dustry The revival law also bans res- toration before August 20 of ceil- ings on-eggs, poultry, tobacco and petroleum, After thnt, consent of. the board is required to re-estab- lish controls. The board also has sweeping jurisdiction over decontrol of all. other commodities, and it may restore ceilings on any item if it deems this necessary. Traffic Charges Filed on White 'Everybody' After Money Official Says That's the Way Probe Shows Wartime Spirit ll.v JOHN W. lll'NDI.ItSON WASHINGTON'. July General .Lindsay C. Warren told senate investigat- ors that "it has looked as if everybody and his brother were out to get the government during the lush war Warren made this statement to the senate war investigating committee. At the same time, he appealed for greater powers for the general accounting office as "the last bulwark for the protec- tion of taxpayers of this countr.V against unbridled and illegal ex- penditures of public funds." Some high officials of govern- ment, be said, accepted enter- liiinmenl, including cocktail par- ties, hotel bills and even travel from cinilracturs" while.- at. thf same drawing travel ex- pense and per diem (daily allow- ance) from the government." This practice, ho added, was "the rule rather than the excep- "It got so bad in the maritime commission, for War- ren said, "that: I called personally on Admiral Land (chairman) whose name was not mentioned in any of the also wrote him officially. He issued n n order condemning such prac- tices." Warren declared that legisla- lion government con- tract prautices during the war had greatly weakened the power of the general accounting office to prevent; extravagnnee or misuse of public funds. Denouncing "abuse of the vast- ly broadened authority given to the procurement agencies, all un- der the guise of war, as well as tho degeneration of moral stan- Warren declared that "cost-plus" procurement "is the greatest device ever invented for pumping out the Warren was called before the compiittoe, which has been in- vestigating war profits of a mid- western munitions combine, to give his advice to possible new anti-profits legislation. T-T. E. White been charged with violation of the rules of the road N'o. 5 by Highway Patrol- man Glenn Clark. The case was filed in Franklin Bourland justice of peace court. The violation is running to Ihe left of the center of an intersec- tion. The incident happened Friday night about, one-mile iiorlli of the eily limits. The complaint was signed by Patrolman Clark and filed by County Attorney Tom D. Me Kcown. Passenger ear and truck output for the first week in July was New Cases Of Folio estimated at p'assen- TULSA, Okla., July Kcr cars going to the guys who The number of poliomyelitis live next door. i cases at Hillcrest Memorial Hos- pital stood at 22 today after ad- Britain Accepting 'In Principal' U. 5. Unity Proposal WASHINGTON. July state department announ- ced today Britain has accepted "in principle" this government's proposal to unify occupation zones in Germany. The department's announce- ment reiterated the hope that Russia and France likewise will accept. Despite this hope, the expecta- tion among diplomats here is that the United States and Britain at once will work out details for unifying Ilieir own zones econ- omically, that Fr.ince probably will join promptly und thai Rus'- sia will refuse lo cooperate. The announcement which may mark n step in the hardening of the great power split in Germany came as Secret a r y of State Byrnes met with Prime Minis- ter Attlee and Foreign Minister Molotov and Bidault in the first day of the Paris peace confer- ence. The state department announ- cement said: "The deportment of stale has been informed that the British government has accepted in prin- ciple the offer of Secretary Byrn- es to join the United States of occupation in Germany with any other for the purpose of treating the so joined as an economic unit. "The department welcomes the announcement as a first step to- ward easing the heavy financial burden resting on the two occu- pying powers and relieving the distress which has resulted from Germany's being divided into four relatively watertight econo- mic compartments. "The department hopes that Ihe other occupying powers will j find it possible to give an equal- 1 ly favorable response to Secre- tary Byrnes' offer. Jn the judg- ment of this government the greatest general advantage would accrue from prompt measures to achieve the economic unity of Germany as prescribed by' the Potsdam agreement." Hungarians Are Unhappy Unofficial Delegation Knowi Newj of Peace Treaty Will Be Bad Newt By A. I. GOLDItlCRC. PARIS, July un- official delegation represent inn Hungary in Paris peace confer- ence circles waited unhnppily to- day for t.h< b.ul news it fclt'sure was conlained in the proposed ponce treaty draft for that coun- try. "We're here to at lend our own one member of Ihe del- egation said, "and it isn't a good .feeling." The group, headed by L.-isx.lo Faragu, economics expert, has not been given a copy of the pro- posed Hungarian treaty, but members have a prett.y good idea of what, will be demanded of how the western pow- ers are split with Russia over free navigation on Ihe Danube. The delegation is composed mainly of newsmen and informa- tion officials, prepared to argue unofficially outside the council halls until Foreign Minister Janos Gyongyosi nnd his aides are sum- moned from Budapest to attend the council sessions and hear the bad news officially. It v.-as Russia's announced al- titude on Chechoslovakia's treat- ment of Hungarian nationals in Slovakia which was proving most galling to members of the group. Russia has upheld Czechoslo- vakia in her announced desire lo deport nearly Hungar- ians. Hungary has protested against any such deportation. __._____.....4-_._.______ Barge-Ferry Crash Causes Heavy Loss Of Life in River U. S. to Urge Open Meetings Treaties for Satellite! To Be Rcleaied for Pub- lication Tuesday Hy A. I. GOLDBERG PARIS, July 21- nalion peace conference, conven- ed formally in Luxembourg pal- ace more than a year after the end of the second World War in Europe, was summoned by Presi- dent George BidauH of Prance today lo abolish "the plague of war." Addressing tin; 1.500 of the victorious allies on behalf )f the host nation, Didault plead- ed: "The long suffering peoples of the world today look to you. If we cannot get complete peace solutions. I hope that at least we will get reasonable ones." In an apparent reformer- to the United Stales and Russia. Bidault said that whatever blame could be attached to the failure to keep Ihe peace after the first World War, a "fundamental cause of that failure was that the two great, powers who had taken a de- cided part in the conquest of arms remained on the sidelines during the solution of. peace." Plain Men Look To Mectinf "The hopes of plain men turned toward us he said. concluding his 10-minutc, slow- ly spoken speech. J3idault wan then named provisional chairman of the conference on the motion of U. S. Secretary of State Jnmes K. Byrnes. Hidault's wordt were carried to a press gallery jnmncd for thp historic occasion nnd throughout the rambling plush building as lie summoned the delegates of the 21 victor nations to fashion peace for Italy, Romania. Hun- gary, Bulgaria a n d Finland. which Die foreign ministers of CARUTHERSVJLLK. Mo., July thc. States, Britain, Russia i rpt and r ranee can aoprove. muddy Mississippi river was searched today for the bodies of at least ten persons, possibly more, who were believ- ed to have perished in the colli- sion of a ferry boat nnd two oil laden barges near here. Thirteen other occupants of the ferry wore saved after the flat boat overturned, dumping at least five vehicles nncl their pas- sengers into the waters. The accident occurred :it p. m. last night 50 yards from the Missouri short ns 1hc ferry ncured completion of its crossing f.i'om the Tennessee side. The oilot of the ferry. Ed Hen- dricks, who was saved when he was tossed on a barge in the crash, was quoted as estimating that there were between 20 and 25 persons in the five or six cars on the flat boat. Other estimates ran as high ns 30. One survivor s.nid the ferry carried four automobiles and one pickup truck. The ferrv tug was demolished and sunk by Ihe impact of the two oil barges, Jinked together and pushed by two tugs in a single train. The ferry over- turned an floated down the river. The two barges, carrying 000 barrels of oil upstream from Jennings, La., bound for Mount. Vcrnon. Ind.. were Ihe Z-t! and the 7'Vod B. Zigler of the G. B. 
                            

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