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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 28, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 28, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             marchin9 about of Chinese forces, one begins to wonder how even in that big land they manage not to meet more often for some real combat Ncl .lutir I'nlil Ctu'llLilitHi 8310 Anclii Hun-all or In ul.illon THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION -13rd 87 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Well on Orphans Home Land Is Oiler Production Found by F. P. Lonohon on Farm .Owned By Baptist Orphans Home Six Mites North of Ada Past Week A story has 5- happened in Pontotoe 'conn- that is Ic-ivnu: everyhody h.'ip- over the outcome-.-even the _____ ___ _. v. ho sold the land and the l-'iith and works have provided with it. la place for the orphaned boys week ,-in oil drill-'and girls to live. i-d i-n Kind ln-lonmng to the Bap- What the well will do isn't ti.-t Orphans Home six miles known yet. When first drilled in nurtn of in the New community flo-.ved yil. P. Lan.'ihan. Salina. drilled the wi-ll, v.-as happv out. so that u lest of "production :t. that he had iieve'r may he made o.arly this week i. 1 I......... f Xt______ ri.ii w-i Bethel Kqs., bo asking a lot of one producer, but it will make the going- some- what easier for those who bv it flowed oil and was obviously a "good well." Late in the week it v.-as shot and is being cleaned seeing n ;.s bel.ii held the royalty under drilled company. Home Can I'sr Income The Orphans Home Manager. B A. liryc-e and the cluster of Baptist churches v.-hich support the home, are happy. kiHiwmi; that oil produc- ini-ans more funds for .some of the equipment badly needed tin- home where more than 3f) and KJI-K arc getting'a home sound Charley now of Cusli- v.'ho years agn .sold the It: the .'mine, two weeks ago lends here that he hoped tr.e '.veil would he a 'gusher' and if it bronchi enouiih funds New BiHhrl Baptist and Hie Ada Missionary Baptist church at 33p East Thir- teenth are. the nearest churches ol the Baptist General Assembly, most of whose churches are in smaller cities over the state. All Of Royalty Intact Having ail of Congress Is Finished On Session Work Debate Opens Monday On Treaties For Five Former Enemy Countries Formal Adjournment Fri- day; Saw, Helped Make History in War, Peace Periods By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON, July The 79th congress slapped "un- finished" labels on many of Pres- ident Truman's favorite legisla- tive proposals today and started heading homeward. The house today picked next Friday us the date for .formal and final adjournment but there was _. little expectation of anything President Truman today named more than formalities and non- I the men of "judgment and fair- controversial business after the i ness" who will form the .decon- week-end. Earlier there had been itrol board set up under the new talk of as early as Wed- price control act: Truman Names Price Board OPA Sweeps About Half Of All Foods Products From Price Control List By STERLING F. GREEN WASHINGTON, July Kll'mP -ill rif oo ly cl.-s VV CU- UUIJILUI clUL. jnc of thr nesday- The senate has yet to act Roy L. Thompson, chairman: .I1 on the resolution. HP is a smithcm Bargain Day in a Junk Yard he ulcl in th.it it was the biggest thing had dune. KvrrylMidy I'loasi-d And gene-rally who alx.ut the well is pleased of the- cheerful story, for royalty Ion many tracts of land in that neighborhood has been sold in i partial lots. But. Charley Stringer never would sell just a part of the roy- alty on the farm, setting a price for all of it when approached by royalty dealers, and as none of them took it he turned all of the royalty to the Orphans Home when the farm was purchased from him to provide additional room for the Home's cattle, pas- tures and other crop needs. Only a few clays ago a diagonal t be spent on a t- to the home inost worthy cause. It isn't likely that the well will furnisn c-nounh income to I'i- riunc-e the home, for that would not on Home to be a dry hole. Providence? Well, it isn't hard to wonder about it, the way ev- erything has fallen out just right. All of a Sudden If Dawns On Us We're Gripped by Drought Temperature Hits 104 Saturday, Pastures Drying Out, No Relief in Sight Until Roin Comej; Last Shower Wot July 2 V.'c- might as wt-U face U_wc're in a DROUGHT. on the resolution. Leaders foresaw possible dif- ficulty in mustering a quorum after today. Without the required number of members present, any man on the floor could block consideration of a measure. The house resolution, 'by Ma- j o r i y Leader McCormack (Mass.) was adopted by-a stand- ing vote of to 3, with Reps. Randolph Kopple- man (D.Conn.) and Grosser (D.- Ohio) observed standing in op- position. What with Headquarters Headquart- Suddenly it is serious, calling to mind the summers of 1934 and 1DHG. h fjimpaijjns find elections, the weather has been just part ol our intention, being marked off 'casually as mighty hot and "1 wish it would rain." F. A. Battery Will Be Activated Soon, Accept Enlistments Watch Fire Hazards I-rc-al built tic here last week until by :i o'clock Saturday af- ternoon the government thermo- meter was at 104 degrees and threatening to go higher." That K definitely the hottest day of the summer. A ]02-degi'ee read- for the previous Saturday had Battery. 111st Field Arlillcrv ''eld the mark until yesterday I'leasc be careful about fires, is the now being matte by ranchers and farm- ers. Dry jrrass on pastures is highly intlamniiihlc and those who build fires along creeks or elsewhere and care- lessly off and leave them with embers alive are en- daiiircriny many fields and pastures. One gust of wind IrissniK one live coal into a icld can start fires that u r n over ninny acres as lias liappcnoil 'in other drciiifihl yivn-s here. The last rainfall reported for Ada was on July 2 when .07 of an inch was recorded. That shower followed i-losu on rains "f I.fi and ,5.'i so that a 48-hour Battalion Oklahoma National Guard, will he activated in Ada week. Li. Joe O. Cathey commandiiii; officer of the bitttif- announce.; that plans are lapitlly fur the aeti- nf liu- unit to lie located Kiiiiert V. .Sarrott. ItiiiK f .-ni.er of the liatlcry locat- ei Ada i.irn.r the war. will c- the new headquarters Ba'.Ury. He will start accepting 1. All men in National Guard ae- jties ciiiila--l ('apt. Harrctl or A of arc available t -r du.f 1: letl iH-tsolinel. I'av Per tit-ill Guard peisonnel, r-v, ...i- of L'eiu-ral officers, re- c-: c one dayV pav for each :yed chill attended after tr.e unit has ree'-ived federal rec- ognition. Hates of pay are the provider! for the bv the pay Ad.just- Kii-sl ri i-nt Act l.ii-.e (IM-I- di ill Technical Stall Sergeant or or Tf Grade -I. Corporal or Technician Grade private. First Class, '_ Private. JL'.r.li. For all person- receive base and longevi- ty and allowances for their L-racle. I'a.vrull B.vred the above pas- sehe- paynill' of the B.itterv located in .-.1111.11111 to The o! tin- I'.aitalion Ik-ad- rs will x-eeivc per t.ini- c.-iielakcr whose pay produced 2.20 inches of rainfall. And do you remember the.- .furious windstorm that ac- companied the .53 of an inch? are suffering definite- v now. Prairie hoy yields are lighter tins yoar and some re- ports are of less alfalfa. Corn Hard Hit corn is hr-ing hard hit. corn was safe. Early hy- brid corn has made a good show- ing for itself this year and with J.3 varieties getting a trial, far- mers should know pretty well by next year which ones are most suited for this county. Water lliose is a suggestion from W. K. Pitt, weather observer and green- house operator. They are starting now to suffer and will continue mOre and more until it he Nil.VS. Until it it may well build tip to still higher tempera- tures than those of .Saturday be- fore rain comes, for the 'earth cools less overnights during such weather as Ponl.oloc county has Many Already Gone There had been some talk of quitting on a recess basis, so that the house leaders could call the members back. Many1' members already have left, and others arranged for de- parture over the week-end, on the longest vacation congress has .had sin'ce 393H when the 75th congress quit on June 16. Behind them lies a record of cooperation with two presidents D. Roosevelt and Harry S. T r u m a the weighty problems of war, and of fierce both on major domestic issues. Historic "Session Before them lie the November congressional elections which Republicans insist will give them control of the house of: repre- sentatives for the first, time since. Herbert Hoover was president. The Democrats express an oppo- site view. Probably no 'congress saw or helped make more history than the 79th. During its tenure the nation's only four-term president died, the shooting phase of the world's worst war came to an end, and the nation started on the long and thorny road back to a peacetime basis. Certainly few congresses ever treated so.coldly the legis- lative requests of a chief execu- tive. President Truman' got from congress just about half the things he requested in more than a dozen messages to the law- He is a southern banker and eco- nomics professor and has been president of the Federal Land Bank of 'New Orleans since 1938. George H. Mead. He'is a mid- dle western industrialist, organiz- er and board chairman of the Mead Pulp Paper Co. of Day- ton, O., he was chairman ol the industrial advisory board under the NRA and later an industry member of the war labor board and member of the advisory board of the office of war mobili- zation. Daniel W. Bell. A veteran treasury department official, he finally became acting director of the budget and treasury under- secretary, resigning to take a position with a Washington bank. Will Have Final Say These men, subject to senate confirmation, will have the final say on what items shall or shall not be under price ceilings and. they will be paid at the rale of a year. The decontrol board is charged with determining whether meat, dairy products and the other items conditionally exempt .from ceilings shall continue fre'e oi controls after Aug. 20. Mr. Truman, in his message to congress after signing the bill Thursday, had promised that the joard members would be "men in, whose.Judgment, and .fairness IHe corigress'and the couritry w'fff: have complete confidence." He told his news conference, that he aimed at an jury. Truitt More Rodeo Animals Stonewall Man Near Top in Steer Roping, Bulldogging At Cheyenne, Says Most of Cowboys There Coming To Ada Rodeo Earl McKendree, one of the managers of: the Ada Rodeo, WASHINGTON, July manager, Dick'Truitt, war profits ir.ve.sli inf 1-, 4__.-___j. _ _ I-j _ _ i' 1.111'npfi Ihnlr Rf-rllimv Inr New Leads In Profits Probe One Tip Is That Firm Paid For 'Influence' and Didn't Get Contract- (Continued on Page 2 Column 6) It Too Badly In Trouble With Police For Trying to Steal Flashlight At Store ONH KIM.KD, THREE A. 15-year old youngster was HUBT 1N COLLISION arrested Saturday afternoon by I STILL WELL, Okla July 27 lidi't- f i ft! 4 .j. .r_____ _ What Controls Are Dropped The OPA meanwhile gave in- dustry and consumers their first clear view of sweeping exemp- tions which removed about half of all foods, products from price control under the OPA revival Ceilings are knocked out, Price Administrator Paul Porter re-, vealed, on all items containing 2Q per cent or more by volume of .meat, poultry and eggs, dairy products, or cotton seed and soy bean derivatives. .The law bars ceilings on anything made "in substantial part" from these farm products and OPA decided 20 pel- cent is "substantial." This lifts the price lid from most mayonnaise, salad dressings, who informed him that he should start trying to obtain ad- ce' ditional rodeo stock as most of the nationally known perform- unpacked ers at Cheyenne, Wyo., are making plans in the big event in Ada. Many Veterans In College During Three Weeks Term Truitt said that some of the best rodeo stock in the country have been purchased, but there were not yet enough animals for the expected large number of performers. Dick In Money At Cheyenne Dick Truitt of Stonewall is in -OP) -sti ga- tors turned their scrutiny today on a reported sale of. Washington influence on war contracts to a firm that did not get the help it paid for. Another focus of Mead com- mittee interest was a story that superior officers had instructions to shield the son of a munitions manufacturer from harm during his war service. Members disclosed that these reports had been turned over to second place in the steer roping Itne staff of the war investigating division and is only four seconds i committee with instructions to out of first place at Cheyenne, determine the truth or falsity of A three weeks term of school i He is also .four seconds out '3o1-n reports. has opened at East Central State j first place in the college with some persons j division. enrolled. This intersession period will last until August 16, accord- ing to Qscar Parker, business manager, Harvey Faust, college registrar, reports that of the 215 that are enrolled, 94 are veterans. margarine and vegetable shorten- Courses offered in this 18-day ings; animal gelatin and ]arci-1 session include English, social canned chicken and powdered biology, education, his- eggs. butter cheese and ice tory- nome economics, and shop. cream: soy bean and soy flour and bread. C.OC. 1U .f ft-l food products i Classes meet six days the maximum work n bulldogeing! At the same lime Chairman Mead (D-NY) announced that Lindsay C. Warren, the comp- general. has been sum- ,__ ._. to a public hearing Mon- ing, for bulldogging, S15 for da-v to explore the possibilities bror.c riding and for bull rid- of checking on improper war Contestants entering the A. d a Rodeo will pay entry fees of I trollor for steer roping. for cnlf rop- moncd ins. If tho expected large number of contestants come to Ada. the purse in steer roping should be about McKondi-ee said Sat- profits through facilities of the general accounting office. Senator Ferguson (R-Mich) disclosed that a Dull-oil concern had been mentioned in tln> re- of the police force been having, and now that' pas- tures and fields arc- drying fast, sweeping over them pick Pl'iy; wimls "wt-opinu over them pick ,111.i.u.i, io >_-I-1..1-- Annual j Up of heat being re- rlfH'k'cl fl'onl "icm and add to the from the sun. after the manager of a down- town store reported that the boy had been caught shop-lifting. The youngster was taken to the police station where he was questioned by Police Chief Quin- ton Blake. According to- the report, 6[ a downtown store, the youngster had _ attempted to stea'l a flash youngster said that he have any money and "wanted a flashlight" so badly that he just took it from a counter. light. The didn't person was killed and three others injured, one critical- ly, in a truck-automobile colli- sion near here today. The highway patrol reported Dan Thurman De Vaughn, 30, Sallisaw city policeman, was kill- ed outright as the machines col- lided at the bottom of a grade. Critically. injured was Jene Ray, 16, Still well, who was taken to a Prairie Grove, Ark., hospital, her sister, Jinimie Ray, 14, and the driver of the car, Roy Trot- ter, 23, Sallisaw, suffered less serious hurts but also were in the hospital. i (person can j Truitt. in-day morning after talking with ported trans.-iclinn with a Wash- Inkc is five hours. Classes begin at a.m. and continue until late afternoon, Glynna Gaines, assistant li- brarian, has taken over the post as head librarian the re- mainder of the summer while Li- brarian Casper Duffer instructs his classes. Oscar Parker also reported that the work order on additional housing units was to be cleared this week and c-0 n s t r u c t: i o n lU-coril Crowds Tlii'.re Truitt reported that Cheyenne was having the largest crowds in the history of the show and ad- ded that he believed that the rodeo there could be used as a measuring stick for the Ada Rodeo. Ticket sales were good Satur- day morning, but rodeo .fans are. reminded that there are still plenty of first-class seats loft; however, the pales, in one week L.ll.: .-i.uu.-l [11 Ulll: ihould.be under way soon favorably with the sales the units on the campus have been completed and are being oc- cupied. The time has come for all the college buildings to' undergo their annual repair and paint job and work will get under way' as soon as possible. I inglon purveyor of "influence." Got Money. Kcni'KVil From another member of liu? who declined to bo quoted by name, it was learned that the committee had received a report that an individual had offered to obtain a war contract for a fee and had then rpnegcd on his part of the transaction af- ter getting the money. This member said that the con- tract was reported as not in- volving the companies in (.he Garsson munitions combine cur- Byrnes Says Peace Depends On Quick Removal of Frictions enii-.lnu: in the Field Ij.-itlalmn can be proud i-f trie World War 31 record. It participated in six ineludiiu; Sicily, Sal- Southern France, t-Trie-. A.nxio Rhinc-lar.ri and Central Germany. C'ol. Joe G. fat hey command- ed the unit in all of the above c-iimpaign.-. Sicily. Okia.. July '.4' Hi-ariim on a protest of an S800.00CI Pottawatumio county bond issue will be held in the district court of Keniv. th .lai-rett here. The was filed liv five county -...._ The News Cla.sbified Ads. IIKITON DKMANDS DEATH FOR 23 TOP NA2IS NUERNBERG, July British Prosecutor Sir Hartley W. Slum-cross demanded todav the death penalty fou 22 top Nazis as retribution for turning the world into a cauldron of death, persecu- tion and horror. JWEATHERJ Oklahoma: Generally fair nnd continued warm Sunday and Monday, high Sunday 100 to 108. By JQIIN M. HIGIITOWER Press niiilnmiilli: Hi'purl.er WASHINGTON, July of State Byrnes set out today for the peace confer- ence opening Monday in Paris, leaving behind for later broad- cast u statement that "the hope of avoiding some 'new and ter- rible war" depended on quick removal of frictions left over from the recent conflict. Senator Connally (D.-Tex.) drew the assignment to read Byrnes' statement over the NBC network six hours after the sec- retary left by plane with as- surances from President Truman that he has the support of: the entire country "in his efforts to get a just peace for the world." Uses President's Plane Byrnes left Washington airport in the president's own 'plane at p.m. On hand to see him off in addition to Mr. Truman were thes.other members of the cabinet, congressional leaders md Chief. Justice Vinson. A crowd estimated at witness- ed the departure! ceremonies which Connally opened by hail- ing Byrnes as a "great ambassa- dor of peace." Byrnes told the airport crowd "Not until these things arc ac- complished will the people them- selves begin to remember how precious peace really is and to make felt their universal deter- mination not to commit atomic he hoped that peace treaties for the secretary said. former German satellite states in Europe would be completed and signed at the end of the 21-na- tion conference. Before leaving Byrnes author- ized Connally to read his 700- word statement of NBC's "uni- versity of the air" series on Am- erican foreign policy. Names Essential Goals In this statement Byrnes call- ed for the earliest withdrawal of Allied occupation troops con- sistent with world security, set- "It seems to me that the hope of avoiding some new and ter- rible war greatly .depends upon how quickly we can remove the dangerous sources of friction left in the wake of the Jast war." May Be More Compromises Thus far progress in peace- making has been "the product of Byrnes said and he declared there is "no use to pretend that more compromises will not be necessary if we are to go the rest of the way." two weeks before the show Jast! under investigation by the but added that disputes, final decisions on rep- which the United States .is currently engaged in argument with max- imum progress in providing peo- ple everywhere with "more food and houses and clothing." .._ have reached and those I hope we will reach will be compromises in- tended to reconcile honest con- flicts of opinion and not to se- cure selfish advantage for our- pj-iccs include tax. The number of round-up clubs planning to participate in the big event here Aug. 14-18 and the number of: feature attractions are just two more of the reasons why the show .this year, will be the biggest ever held in Ada. Friday Continued (ops' Quiet Period Police officials Saturday morn- ing made their fifth arrest since Monday. A negro man was ar- rested for carrying a concealed 38 revolver. He posted a bond and will report to the sta- tion for his hearing Monday. Only one accident has been Garsson "Taken Care Of Committee members said the report did not say whose "influ- ence" the Washington man had purported to use in obtaining contracts, but declared that this Big Four Call Peace Meet Treoties Already Drafted For Axil Net Prepared for Germany By ROBERT C. WILSON PARIS, July lomats and a sprinkling of mili- tary experts from 21 nations will meet in the sprawling Luxem- bourg palace at 3 p.m. (8 a.m. CST) Monday to open debate on peace treaties to shape the fu- ture of inhabitants of five former enemy countries. Convoked by the United States, Russia. Britain, and France, the Paris peace conference offers 17 invited nations the chance to make recommendations but recommendations pacts with Italy, Romania, Finland, Hungary and Bulgaria. The treaties already have been, drafted by the foreign ministers of the four major powers. Among other details, the pacts would limit the former axis satel- lites to armies totaling men for all five, and would ex- act total reparations of more than Different to 1919 By comparison with the 1919 Versailles peace parley after World War One. the importance of the Paris conference it limited by two major factors: 1. Treaties already have boon prepared, whereas 27 years ago 32 nations participated actively in writing the original pacts. Fi- nal treaties will not be concluded here, but by the United States, Russia, Britain and France after this conference. 2. The treaty with major European adversaries of the not been prepar- ed and will not be discussed for- mally by the delegates ex- pected to attend. It will written at a subseqjientjjuterni- tional conference. Among the leading are U. S. Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, Soviet Foreign. Minister, V. M. Mololov; Primo Minister Clement Attlee, substi- tuting for the ailing British Fore- ign Secretary Ernest Bevin; French President and Foreign Minister Georges Bidault; Aus- tralian Minister of External Af- fairs H. V. Evalt; Czechoslovak Foreign Minister Jan Masaryk; New Zealand Finance Minister Walter Nash and Canadian Minister W. L. MacKcnzie King. Mplotov and Deputy Foreign Minister Anroi Vishinsky arrived n Paris this afternoon. Byrnes is expected tomorrow. Lt. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith. J. S. ambassador to Moscow, and. Gen. Georges Catroux, French imbassador to Russia, are among the military figures who will at- .end. Depends On Biff Pour Diplomatic informants say the inference, while in many res- K-cts a men- formality, "will bts is important as the Big Four want it in bo." They explained that this hinges on whether tin? four powers who drafted the treaties encourage, either openly or secretly, sug- gestions by the smaller nations, whether they agree later to in- corporate such recommendations into the treaties, and whether they might increase the confer- ence's scope by asking other na- tions to come.. The latter question, French sources said, may conic up on the first day when the conference is asked to rule on whether to sum- mon delegates from the five for- mer enemy countries and from other nations such as Egypt, Lux- Turkey. Albania, and Mexico, who have asked for ad- mission. Bidault will open the confer- ence Monday with a welcoming address. Important procedural ejuos- was one ol the things they would lions, on which French sources seek to bring out in the investiga-1------------------------------------------------ lion. (Continued on Page 2, Column 3) The second of the two new lines of inquiry resulted from a request by Senator Kilgore (D- It was based, the senator said, on a published statement by Joseph Garsson, formerly a cap- tain in tho chemical warfare ser- vice, that throughout his army career his commanding officers were under instructions to "lake care of Garsson." OKLAHOMA CITY. July Marsha Lee Reise, daughter of Mrs. Imogene a driveway. Mrs. Reise had left her daugh- ter with a friend while she was at work. (Continued on Page.2 Column 5) reported this week and one rob- j Reise, Oklahoma City, was killed bery. The police have been busy, j today when struck by an aulo- nevertheless, with several inves- mobile while she was'plaj'ing in tigations going on. The weekend may bring in several more ar- rests and in all probability there will be an accident involving a car backing as there have been for the past several weeks. Cecil Smith, who took time out to run a close race' with Clyde Kaiser i'or county sheriff, is back in city .police uniform. Rocky Mountains include no active volcanoes, and you'll find no among Sinnett-i cl'imb to 'the 'lop Wa.shinir-' Meaders customers. 7-UU-lt I ton Monument. BETHANY. Okla.. July accidental discharge of his shotgun instantly killed Amos Ray Schre.ine.i-, 4-1, Bethany, as he was leaving his home here on a hunting trip this afternoon. A baby crying for an hour uses u_p enough potential energy to Lem Wheeler says, as 'n average thing, 'is hats hold the'r shape pretty good fer th' first three er four years. When we see a feller with 'is billfold stuffed full o' foldin' money we allus won- der if th' little woBuut ain't beiu' held out OK   

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