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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 23, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             The pros and cons of candidates and issues have had it for weeks, today it is at the "for or against" stage in the ballot booths, and tomorrow it will be "in or out" for many candidates. Average .Net June Paid Circulation 8310 Mrmbrr; Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 8IJ ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COUNTY VOTING GETS OFF TO BIG START First City Council Meet Establishes New Municipal Enabling Ordancos Passed, Luke B. Doddi Named Acting City Manager, Lively Discussions Precede Decisions On Some Points as Ada Changes to Council-Managed Form The first meeting of the city council was much hotter Monday afternoon than the weather, but in the long run most of the points tinder discussion were settled. Starting at 12 noon, the meeting" continued without a break until p. m., at which time councilmen decided to have another meeting Wednesday at p. m. The former mayor, Luke B. Dodds, was appointed to the position of city manager on a temporary basis, which, ac- cording to officials of the council, will permit him to serve in that capacity not more than 90 days. Just a Timely Reminder Salaries Set For Workers Departments Established, Salary Scales Decided On For City at Present The ordinance fixing Ihe sal- 1 74 city employees about one of the most srics o brought lengthy discussions Monday that Spencer Selected Mayor On a motion by Councilman H. j J Huddleston, Councilman C. F. i Spencer was named acting chair- man and was later elected by ac- clamnalion as mayor of the new city form of government, which replaces the three-commissioner type. Huddleslon was elected vice- mayor and Ray Martin, who has been serving as commissioner of finance, was elected city cleric. Fourteen enabling ordinances were introduced and passed by the councilmen giving the new form of government the right to operate. Carry Emergency Clause has taken place in city govern- ment in vcars and apparently was a guide stic-k as to how all city The emergency clause in each matters w'ill be handled in thcjof the ordinances stated that "an future. i emergency is hereby declared to .rollowine is a list of positions exist because of -the change in and the salaries to be paid at the city charter. In the judgment proved the new compromise OPA revival bill. Mrs. James Byrnes, left, wife of the Secretary of Slate, and Mrs. Chester Nimitz, wife of Fleet Admiral Nimilz, can peaches at a Washington, D. C., community center as a timely reminder of Home Canning Week. Solons May Today Restore OPA's Life Showdown Votes Urged That Would Revive Price Controls at. Midnight Tonight By FRANCIS M. LE MAY WASHINGTON, July house today ap- present: City manager city treas- urer assistant to the city treasurer chief clerk of the water office two clerks of the water office S150 each. Chief of police S200. assistant chief of police S175, three desk sergeants SI50 each, six patrol- men until two are transferred to in-service training. thereafter four each, one patrolman S100 and six patrolmen, in-ser- vice training each. Fire Department Chief of the fire department S200, assistant chief of the fire department eight firemen each, one fireman Superintendent of streets seven employees each. Superintendent of the water department, per month un- til Aug. 1, 1946, and thereafter S200. A plumbing inspector eight water department em- ployees Superintendent of cemeteries S150. Superintendent of parks Der month until Aug. 1, 1046, and will s'.ead of a oart time job as it was under the old form of gov- ernment. Park Attendants Park attendant, until Aug. 1, 2946. S125. park attendant for four months each year swimming pool attendant for four months per year swimming pool attendant for four months per year Airport department superinten- dent S150, three disposal plant employees S150 each, supervisor of the incinerator and disposal plant per month until Aug. 1. 1946. and thereafter Incinerator helpers jani- tor of the city hall. per liion- ihe until Aug. 1, 194K, and there- after The pound man will be some other employee of the city who shall hold this job with-. _______ __.________? ou: additional salary. City at- (lerials or equipment, with "certain torney librarian two; exceptions; providing that surplus assistants to the librarian or obsolete supplies, materials or each and a janitor at SCO. Casual Labor thereafter as the job become a full-lime job in- of the council, the public peace, health or safety demands the passage of this ordinance as an emergency ordinance." The first ordinance, which is No. 771. file No. 1-1, provides that a separability clause for ordinan- ces to determine the effect'of the holding of a part of an ordinance invalid by a court or competent jurisdiction and declaring .an emergency. The ordinance was introduced by Huddleston. Spencer introduced the second ordinance file No. 1-2 providing that when the masculine gender is used in the ordinances of the city, it shall also mean the fern-1 inine unless the masculine alone is clearly indicated. On passage it becomes ordinance No. The lime of regular meetings of Ihe council and the place was each meeting was file No.1 1-3 and be- come ordinance No. 773. Departments Established An ordinance creating a police depdrtmenl, a fire department, a street department, a water depart- ment, a cemetery department, a park department; airport depart- ment, sanitation department and the offices of Ihe heads of the de- partments by various titles and certain other offices in the'depart- ment, also prescribing certain du- ties of the departments and de- claring the city attorney to be head of the department of law was introduced by Vernon Rob- erts and was made ordinance No. 774, file No. 1-4. Ordinance Na. 775, file No. 1-5, was passed requiring the 'city manager to he head of the sani- Search Debris For 50 Missing Jews, Arabs Join British In Resentment, Horror At Terror Bombing In Jerusalem By OSGOOD CABUTHERS JERUSALEM, July 23, police spokesman announced to- day the detention of about 20 Jews in connection with the ter- roristic; bombing. so that the measure, if finally approved, might go to the JKing David White House by night fall. The house earlier decisively rejected a move to strip' all price controls from the compromise bill, which would have the measure as a simple authority over rents. The plan was defeated first on a standing vote of 159 to 120, and then rejected on a formal roll call 220 to 135. The .action sent the measure, worked out in a senate- house conference, committee, to the senate for action there. The plan was to obtain senate action later this afternoon Outcome of Sheriff, Governor Races Vie for Top Interest In Climax of Stirring Campaigns County Producers Of Dairy Products Call Price Meeting Some Pontotoc county produc- ers, of dairy products are dissatis- fied with the prices that they have been receiving and are ask- ing that all producers of dairy products meet in the district court room Saturday at 1 p. m. A short meeting was held Mon- day morning. The men present discussed the policy of the Farm Bureau relative to milk, cream and other dairy products. County dairymen will be work- ing through the Federal Farm Bureau. Capitol Hill felt certain Mr. Truman would sign the measure even though (1) he vetoed the first congressional attempt to trim OPA's powers and (2) the new compromise bans price ceil- ings on major foods for at least tation department and acting head of other administrative depart- ments under certain circumstan- ces if qualified was introduced M. W. "Red" Walker. An ordinance requiring that the city manager also be the city pur- chasing agent, providing for com- petitive bidding on the purchase of. or contract for, supplies, ma- I Phil McLachlan, president of the county group, says that there has been an increase in the a- mount paid for dairy products, but dairymen have been receiv- ing less money since the raise in price than they did before they received the raise. In Pontotoc county there are about 70 members and it is hop- ed by present members that the number can be increased to about 200. The Federal Farm Bureau was equipment offered for sale, with __....._ certain exceptions was introduced The city manager is by Wuddleston and on passage be- ea to employ casual laborers and ?omo ordinance No. 776, file No. extra help in the various depart- ments and agencies of the city government at a wage ranging :'rom 75 cents per hour to per hour, depending upon the skill required and the to be performed. type of labor Officers and employees of the city will receive only one salary each. In ancther ordinance. for salaries of employees engaged in the collection and disposal of garbage and trash was prescribed while for maintenance and operation of equipment used in the collection and disposal of gar- bage and the disposal plant ex- c-lusive of salaries was given. Two truck drivers will receive. S133 each and four helpers will I Acting or substitute municipal receive S125 each. Out of the funds received for the collection and disposal of garbage and trash' the above! Jnc Bounty court was introduced amounts were appropriated for t.-ie fiscal year 1946-1947. includ- l-G. File No. 1-7 was introduced by Spencer providing that the city clerk shall have custody of cer- tain records, books and papers; prescribing certain duties of the city clerk relating to city, elec- tions. The file become ordinance No. 777. Municipal Judge Hensley introduced file No. 1-8, which become ordinance No. 778, requiring that the municipal judge and an acting or substitute municipal judge when appointed shall hold some other office or employment in the service of the city; providing that they shall re- ceive no additional salary or com- pensation as municipal judge or judge as the case may be. An ordinance providing for. ap- peal from the municipal court to 30 days. OPA Head Favors Signing Any congressional concern a- bput another veto was virtually dispelled yesterday when Paul Porter, OPA administrator, disclosed to newsmen that he had told the president the compro- mise is better than the bill Mr. Truman refused to sign in June. If OPA is reborn, the agency must determine immediately at persons The known dead mounted to 48. Military rescue crews who toil- ed in the debris of the hotel, the seat of British army headquart- ers and the secretariat of the Palestine government, reported that 41 bodies had been recover- ed and seven others located. Fifty persons were unaccounted for. Arab Language The police spokesman said that, although most of the party which planted milk cans of explosives wore Arab dress, all the evidence indicated they were young Jews. Eyewitnesses said the attackers spoke Hebrew. The spokesman said a search was "going on right now in the old city of Jerusa- lem.' A truck and a taxi, both stolen, which were abandoned by the attackers were searched for fingerprints and other possible clews. Workers moved 200 tons of de- Voffng Runs From Light 80 Average In Much ol Slate By The Associated Presi Balloting was heavy in Tulsa county as perfect weather spurred voters choosing democratic nom- inees for governor and other Ok- lahoma offices but jn other sec- tions of the slate :t ran from light to average. Main interest centered in the democratic gubernatorial race which found Dixie Gilrner, Tulsa county prosecutor, pitted against Roy J. Turner, Oklahoma City oil and cattleman. In contrast to the heavy vote in Tulsa county, that in Oklahoma county was reported lighter than in the July 2 primary. An index to the trend in Ok- lahoma county was seen in Ward One where the voting was off about one-third as compared to that on July 2 at the same hour. Both Gilmer and Turner made last minute pleas to the voters by radio as election day dawned. Hot In Rogers County Vinita, Pryor and Miami re- ported a light early vote, but Rog- ers county officials said the run- off total there promises to exceed that of the first primary. M u s k o g e e, Okmulgee and Creak counties reported voting was about the same as on July 2_ P a w h u s k a, Bartlesville and Stillwater reported a light .vote" in the forenoon, but precinct officials in these cities noted that balloting is usually heavier during the noon hour and in the hours after work. Pawnee Republicans Out Pawnee reported that nearly as many republicans as demo- crats were participating in the election there. I n northwestern Oklahoma, .however, Ponca City reported an j extremely light vote was being cast. And in southwestern Oklahoma, first reports from Law ton indicat- ed fairly heavy election activity with prospects of a balloting to- tal equalling that of the first pri- mary. Chickasha reported that electors had marked ballot there in the forenoon and election board Secretary C. A. Hardesty predicted the Gracly county would be about the same as in the first primary when Grady residents voted. what levels prices are to be en-1 bris under floodlights during, the forced pending full computation j night, and the officer in charge of the new and in many cases. said the job was less than half higher prices called for under the bill. These need not be an- nounced for 30 days. Showdown votes were set to- day, first in the house and then in the senate. The house was expected to act quickly, but there was some pos- sibility senate foes of the price agency might want to do a lot of talking in advance of a vote in that chamber. Taft Changes Over However Senator Taft (R- Ohio) announced he would sup- port the compromise. It was his pricing amendment in the vetoed bill that provoked the sharpest organized four years ago for the (Presidential criticism of that measure. The pricing formula later was modified. Some debate appeared likely in the house. Rep. Wolcott (R- a member of the 14-man senate-house conference commit- tae which wrote the comoromise bill, refused to support it. "I will not be a party to the almost inevitable confusion which will result from attempts to administer this Wolcott told reporters. The Michigan lawmaker voic- ed fears that some dairymen and other food producers might re- purpose of taking care of legisla-1 measure lion pertaining to agriculture. Reckless Driving Is Charge on Blevins Elmer Blevins was charged with reckless driving, in the Per- the amounts spent 1 to ed during the period July July 22. 1946. It is a simple and easy matter to remove nails from loose boards, and it is a good safety measure. During an electrical storm it is dangerous to under a lone tree or near wire fences. by Roberts and before becoming ordinance No. 779, it was file No. 1-9. Everything in the entire proce- dure had gone smoothly until this point and there had been little discussion, but things started pop- ping when salaries .for certain positions were discussed. Salary Discussion Warms I'p Manager Dodds told the coun- cil that per month was not (Continued on Page 2, Column 2) cy Armstrong justice of peace court, Monday morning after. Highway Patrolman Harvey Hawkins signed a complaint. Blevins is alleged to have driv- en a 1945 .Chevrolet truck from an unknown point to a point one mile south of the junction on Stale Highway No. 99 without due regard to traffic existing there. The defendant was arrested Sunday by Troopers Hawkins and Glenn Clark. STILLWATER, Okla., July 23, farmers in South Da- kota need 175 medium'sized com- bines with pickup attachment to complete the state's wheat har- ves, Shawnee Brown, Oklahoma A. and M.-college extension direc- tor, reported yesterday. Brown said he was notified of the need'for combines until the crop is" harvested. OKLAHOMA July 23, electric shock received as she attempted to cut off a washing machine, yesterday kill- to further con- said there was: fuse to submit trols. And he danger of a "famine" in- meats! and other foods because of un-1 certainties in the bill whether controls ever will be restored on these items. completed. Hospitals reported that 50 per- sons were still undergoing treat- ment for injuries and that dozens of others .had been treated for minor wounds. 12 Senior Officers Killed The Palestine government said the missing included 12 senior British officers of .the govern- ment secretariat. The names of British victims were being with- held pending notification of their News Party Tonight You Are Invited to Open- Air Party to Hear County, State Election Returns That's just, what you arc invited to do tonight. The regular Ada News Election Party will be held on North Broadway tonight, with the 100 block roped off from traffic so that 'citizens will have plenty of room. There will be a loudspeaker in use that will make announcement of election returns audible for some distance so that all can hear. Reports are due to start com- ing in early this time. Those who like to be out in the open on a cool evening with plenty of other folks around to visit with, or who like to let out a whoop 'n a holler when their candidates make a vote gain will finrl the News parly just the place to be. Stalion KADA and The News are cooperating, too, as before, to get broadcast announcements right along from the News office on the results of Pontotoc county voting. The News will also have a con- slant stream of bulletins from the Associated Press headquarters at Oklahoma City on how the votes are mounting over the state. Police Report No Arrests on Monday One Soldier Taken To Texas, Other Still Held Police department officials re- ported Tuesday morning that no arrests were made Monday. Pvt. Frank Krites was picked up by Texas police and returned to Wichita for trial, but his being removed was the only action tak- ing place. Another soldier who was arrested Wednesday of last week for being AWOL is still be- ing held pending word from his commanding general. A.da traffi.' had a perfect day without any accidents being re- ported. For the first day in quite a while no cnrs were involved in (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) Wilkes Accused Of Fiji-Feel Attack A case of assault and battery was filed against Warren Wilkes in the Percy Armstrong justice of peace court Monday. Wilkes is charged with having made an assault upon Marvin E. Quails, Jr., with his fists and feet and "did beat, bruise, wound and injure him." Witnesses in the case include R. H. Smith, Dud Jones, Johnnie Cornell, Walter Ferguson, Ray Thompson, Bert Dorsey and Embezzlement Case Is Filed in Ada A case of embezzlement ,was filed by County Attorney Toni D. McKeown in the Franklin Bour- land justice of peace court Mon- day morning after Bessie Brewer signed a complaint against James Neal. Brewer told the county atlorney that she entrusted in the posses- sion' of Neal a combination radio- ed Mrs. Katie Disch, 41. A fire I record player valued at department pulmotor squad fail-i He is alleged to have converted ed to revive her. I the radio-record plaj'er to his own [use and to have sold it to a pur- Read the Ada News Want Ads. chasine aeent. THEN SHE COLLAPSED PITTSBURGH, July .Mrs. Anna Witmer, 45-year-old grandmother, met up .with a masked robber as she walked down a 'flight of stairs at her home yesterday. With one blow, she knocked him clown the stairs. Then she glimpsed .a pistol he dropped, in his flighl with from the kitchen. She collapsed. Read the Ada News Want Ads. Oklahoma: Increasing cloudi- ness tonight; scattered thunder- showers southwest half of state, late tonight or Wednesday. Cool- er Wednesday, west and north to- nicht. Secretary Asked To Be 'Hazy' Testifies Freeman, Henry Garsson Wanted Her To Dodge One Admission WASHINGTON, July Jean Bates, former secretary in the Washington of- fice of a munitions combine, said today that Joseph Freeman and Henry Garsson had asked her to be "hazy" in testifying before the senate war investigating commit- tee. She testified that Freeman and Garsson, officials in the combine, had attempted to "play upon my sympathy" when she met their request with a refusal to "per- jure myself." They were particularly anxious she said, to prevent her from tell- ing the committee, under oath, that she had seen Albert Jacob- son, war department consultant, in the combine's Washington office. The conversation with her for- mer employers, she related, took place on. July same day she appeared before an executive session of the committee to tell what she knew about the affairs of the combine. She said that Mrs. Freeman called her away from her broth- er's birthday party to the Free- man home where she met both Freeman and Garsson. They asked her first vvlint she had told the committee in private session, she said, and then quick- ly got to the point of Jncobson. UNTKOUBLKD BV HCL STOUGHTON, Mass.. July A. Whitlen. 60, a carpenter who estimates his year- ly expenses at is not con- cerned about the high cost of liv- ing. Here's why: Home? He built the two-room house he lives in. Vegetables? He grows them. Meat? He goes hunting for that. Haircuts? He let's it grow. Electricity and t e 1 e p h o n e? Doesn't have Fuel? He cuts his own wood. And furthermore, he lakes all summer off. collisions while parking places. backing out of No robberies wore reported and very few Ada citizens phoned in complaints to give police officials one of their quietest days this year. Nothing Important, Dickstein Asserts Doesn't Remember Actually Speaking Over Phone To Garssons or Freeman WASHINGTON, July 23, Judge Samuel Dickstein of the New York supreme court told the senate war investigating commit- tee today that it was "possible" he had telephoned the Washing- Ion office of Ihe Erie Basin Metals company from New York in 19'12, but only on n social matter. Dickstein formerly w'as chnir- man of the house immigration committee. He said he had no recollection of. having talked to Murray Garsson, one of the pro- moters of Erie and associated companies now under war profits investigation, but added that he "may have talked to Joe Free- man." Joseph Freeman was Washington representative of Erie. "He wanted me to get h i m some tickets to a theater or Dickslein recalled. "I may have received such a call but that's about all." Dickstein said that he had known Murray Garsson since 193] while the Intler was an in- vcsligalor for the department of labor, but declared that he had never had any business or offi- cial relations with him at any time. He added that he knew Henry M. Garsson "slightly'" but knew nothing about the business affairs of either of the brothers. Senator Ferguson CR Mich) asked about a series of telephone calls which he said had been made in the summer of 1942 be- twen the Washington office of the munitions firm and Dickstein's office in New York. One of the calls was collect from Dickstein, he said, to Murray Garsson or Joe Freeman. "I don't remember what it was." Dickslein replied. "I don't remember that I actually spoke to them." i Boren-Johnson Race Has Forged Near Top in Last Week Favorable Weather And Keen Interest Sending Many Votcri to Today Ponloloc county citizens started their inarch to the polls early to- day and in numbers that indicate that more of them than usual are concerned about who's nominated in this year of nonpresideTltial campaigning, Some early estimates have set the probable total vote as high as that of the first primary three weeks ago, when more than 00 countians balloted. Everything contributed to the heavy vote outlook, including weather that is fair and warm, but without the excessive heat that prevailed last wock. Campaigning Goes On Today Candidates and their workers are laboring unceasingly today, seeking to reap a harvest of votes from the planting and cultivation of their candidacies through weeks of early summer. Pontotoc county voting is spur- red toy the hot race for nomina- tion for sheriff. Many counties over the state have only the statu and congressional races left to stir the voting population but this county's two remaining contests energetically boosting the to- tal. Sheriff Race I.i Healed In f.'ict, with many citizens sheriff's race between Clyde Kai- Ser. veteran sheriff, find Cecil I Smith, former Ada policeman, I takes the No. 1 spot in their in- terest, shoving aside even the Gilmer-Turner gubernatorial ap- peals. This county has been a hotbed of campaigning in that governor race, however, and the heated cnmpaiging of Cong. Lylc Boren for reelection to a sixth term in congress and of Glen D. Johnson of Okemah to retire him to pri- vate life has been bringing a ris- ing tide of interest since the first election. Not to be omitted is the race which Virgil Modjock, Pontotoc county representative, is making against stato Senator Al C. Nich- ols of Wewoka, both having made as hard a campaign as this part of the slate has seen this year. Also lit stake is the place long held on the bonrd of county com- missioners by George Collins, rep- resenting District Two. with Bob Austell earnestly challenging Col- lins for the place. Laurel T) Face Court MANILA, June Laurel, president of the Philip- pines during the Japanese occu- pation, arriveu with three col- leagues by plane from Japan to- day to face treason trials in a. people's court. The four were whisked off to Muntinglupa prison after the U. S. army turned them over to civil officials i.f the Philippines. "There's nothing Hke being better or Laurel commented on arrival. 3 FROM YANK ZONE FOR MARRYING FRANKFURT. Germany, July American civi- have expelli.-d from pc- cupiod Gcrma.iy for marrying German girls in violation of the U. S. army's ban on German- Americnn weddings, army offi- cials said today. All are former soldiers whose marriages were revealed when they asked the nrmy to ship their wives to the United States as "war brides" at government ex- pense. TH' PESSIMIST ll.r Unit tllimki, Jr. A political office is whut a lot o' candidates run walk back. They say you're as ol' as you feel, but that can't be right iii our jest don't live that long.   

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