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Ada Evening News: Friday, July 19, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - July 19, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                                 %  No. H.. Bm. .he- it i, wise, it you ,olu« . Hhrt W.nd.Kip, „    ,„,. ri „ 9     i„t.    .    bested    polloi    di«„„i.„    with    hi™    i.    y OU     .l r e.dy    t now    h ,     i$     „    , h .     0 , h „     ti<U    of     , he     , enec   Sterag* Net June Caid I In (elation  8310  'tembef %udu Hurcau of t Ululation  THE ADA EVENING NEWS  FINAL EDITION  4 *rd Year—No. HO  ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY. JULY 19, 1918  Saturday Afternoon Brings Ada’s Exciting First Race Of Boys In Soap Box Derby  Many Spectators To Watch Lads, Fleet Vehicles Compete  First Roce Scheduled for 3 P. M., Inspections Begin At I P. M.  Soap Box Derby Trophies  '■ put i the* tin ** * t ip Box Dei by i at ** find is South Broadway. id bf plenty of color and nt for those attending first of its ]. md ever held  r.  Si  (  T  ha  Si* t abc  All  iv * tx en on display at .* vrolet since Wednes owners can get their Friday aft* i noon or day to nud e lad minute re bef • e tile rn,.mr in pection I pm, Saturday.  Public To See Racers of the i ,a ei * and their own ex will be placed on a large trailer Saturday morning and will tx taken for a ride through Ada. The trader will later tx* parked a: a downtown location so that the public can inspect the racers.  The first rai l* is scheduled to start promptly at 3 p m. and from a inturn a ta «n available Robert L Parker an i M. ll. Lew is. Jr.,  v  d bt the first two contestants.  P AIRINGS  ng is a list of contest* and now they vs. ill appear  i the schedule:  ( lass A  Ti ink Sn.ith drew*  I III sc bins are admiring a few of the trophies and awards made to   A,, - An,tr,c * n   I hr Herby .an event for boys between the ages of ll and 15 inclusive U ZSZZ&&ISXS. “ nd     The    Finals    will be fcrM  a live. Ku  alc  ace Gene Moore, will race Perry Jeral White  gene Ty ler will i Jar' es R Wood ' tom and ew a bvt .  I I,«ss It  Cl arb s P< it cir. w a b\ <• Rob  > I Pat , will  ;  .u «• M B ev. is J* Has sell Spoons drew * e and David M Brown drew  L **4 ii I s   j*  T  >be  A I  end  Cia:  a list of the order - will be run lei    will tare Gene  Wf Robert L Parker whit race It    I'v iv .Ii    . second; James  J* *• ’d    and Pe;    t y Don McBroom  ' e third; the winner c»f the Lew ss i ace will i ace .* s r, t*. fou; th; the Ty let e * inner will lait* Frank S; n v id race Brown: I-McBroom winner will te in I la* ev’t nf ti i fire a •n ra ••    in ( la B for   f 'f' r    h*muled as the  ' *    •    ('la    A consolation  b< n nth ('la.. B finals :** Ila tenth t ace and Class ar x*- ii! Im the eleventh race  * ’ a twelfth i a? e will pit tin*  * A v <nc again: t the Class inner for tile Ada champion*  Premature Blast Is Surprise at Bikini  Flash Bomb for Synchronising Cameras Goes off Early; Blondy Says Some Thing Couldn't Hoppen with A-Bomb  By ELTON C. FAY  ABOARD USS. MT. MCKINLEY, July 19. (AP) A  lot Re magnesium flash bomb used to synchronize cameras went (iff :>1 minutes prematurely today during a rehearsal for tho underwater atomic bomb test, but Vice Adm. W. II. P. Blanch’ quickly gave assurances the same thing could not happen with the real atomic explosive.  ■a j    ~    ~    Tho    flash    startled    the cross-  t.C. Baccalaureate  |road * ,ask f,,r< " bul caused no  Services Arranged For Sunday Night  Four Injured In Accident Near Ada  Mrs. Ruth Wolsh Reported In Criticol Condition; Cor Hit Truck, Station  Four person* are in Valley View hospital, one in critical condition, following an antonio bile accident of I do Thursday when Hi** vehicle in which they were riding went out of control and crashed into a tiuck and filling station a mile north of Ada.  Highway patrolmen invested mg the accident report**! Friday morning that Mrs Ruth Stans bury Walsh, 330 West Sixteenth, apparently i> tho worst injured of the four, She his a deep cut in Bu* forehead and a deep cut in the right side.  Hor sister, Mrs. Nadine Hum, of the same address, lins chest in-iuries an I cuts about the head, reported painful hut not serious!  Leon Rvies, 315 South Stockton, -  has many cuts and bruises about his head and face, a broken jaw and sc Vera I tooth missing and Robert Leonard, driver, of the same address, has hen I and face injuries and a bruised chest, with extent of injuries to his chest undetermined.  The patrolmen report that the car was said by v itnesses to have been  ■rn*  five cents the copy  Conferees Unable To Find Common Basis On OPA Bill  Kramers To Head Board  Noted Dutch Scientist Chairman of UN Atomic Energy Commission  • • are a total of 12 races led J* i In ca h division the; *•  b*- a consolation race to de  De  r a p I hen  bv Do  .Hr f  On To \kron  wns at Akron, Ohio, a r ' lr; than evei Au,;., t 18 With Hie Ada r p on being one of the con int Man;, thousands of dot have been * p< nt in th*- \ enc* r. ' the unique racing plant  p.  ie \ .... champion is assured it th? ill of hi? young lifetime h. i aret to the na  in  S* \ * :. xp< i ted  .£ « ven  h ; SM XK )  'ice I he  i ices  S.  lop ( be a  of ♦ b  cdi« I persons jim bf* present for tin  urdi.y afternoon, if I ave visited the Sri** j at - * how I nom dui mg I e pas’ three days is ani measur- i g stick  A star ti: g ramp has been con j ■ ucb I and will be located at the ! if the :acing hill. There will \ judges stand at tin* bottom J ie hill with a timer and tm;*)! j flag waver on hand at that;  ♦  , RI NO, J Hr 19    -I’ City I  age: ( A Bentley has an j wed p an* for a renegotiation I uranee policies on munici-owned buildings here with *w to giving the city greater action at a savings in cost. a  New Guinea, every woman irued Mary  ♦  i tilt A la News Want Ads  rnent address  iWEATH ER  OK;arv n.a Partly cloudy and *('• tonight with scattered tnunaerstor ms < ast and south poi- :     Saturday fan and cooler east  an a south.  ♦  I arecas! for July 19 22  Kansas Nehi .<• *... and  •kin horn* Not quit** * • > wa int  •** ouri Saturday, little temper -  nd Monday followed mc ax through Wedne la;. with temperatures average g *     1     <•*    gr<    ■ abox * seasonal  ne:’nab > vet district, rain will be light * va ; Tuesday \v;th average I*  r * h or less appearing in widely mattered thunder showes    eon  lr  % n  A class of 50 seniors at East Centi a1 Stat - * college will on Sunday begin their final week of • drool and graduation activities.  Sunday night at the college auditorium tile baccalaureate Ber mon will be delivered by Douglas V. Magers, pastor of 11i** First Pre bx lei ian church, Okmulgee.  A number of local churches w ill dispense with their usual Sunday night services so that members can attend the service at tile college  Thu isday morning at IO o’clock comes Un* commencement progs am. also ut the college auditorium.  lh M I*’ Sadler, president of {installed in tin* bomb firing cir-Texas Christian university, Ft cult.”  Worth, 'I ex as. for tin* past IO Blandv disclosed that a dummy, '• .ii , will deliver the commence fton-explosive depth charge,  I w'hich represented tin* atomic j bomb, was planted underneath the guinea pig fleet for practice j purposes today and emitted a radio sound precisely at the intended time.  Watchers on this flagship were startled to see tile flash and min-inture bomb cloud soar over tin* target fleet almost an hour before the scheduled time.  Blandv declared the accidental firing of tlx* flare “simply cannot happen to the atomic bomb.” Precautions are so elaborate, he said, “not even lightning'’ could set it off before all hands are miles away in safety.  Short-Circuit Suspected rile first guess of smoke task foie'* officials was that a rain squall, w hich swept over the lagoon early in the morning, had short-circuited the wiring on the crude device.  Bad weather also complicated I the dress rehearsal, forcing a half plane hour postponement of the zero a quar-1 hour.  Rain clouds forced cancellation of plans to use navy drone planes in the rehearsal, although army aviation based on distant islands took part.  \ ice Adm. Blandv requested that the story of the premature flash be held  cars, w ent out of control, swerved back and forth.  Then it swerved into a small service station of the Hollis Rig and Roe! company, hit tho rear of a tug oilfield truck that was being serviced, caromed off and knocked down a gasoline pump.  The truck was damaged little but the automobile was badly torn up.  Truman Unlikely To Make Sweeping U.S. Political Campaign  By JACK BELL AP Political Reporter  WASHINGTON. July pi. (.T*  Democratic politicians forecast today I hat if President Truman takes th** stump this fall he and other party leaders will pick in dividual congressional contest i rather than arrange a wide tour.  Associates said that so far as they know there is no thought in Mr. Truman’s mind of trying to duplicate the grand tour of BHK in which President Wilson c arried his fight for off year con bol of congress to the people. Demos Lost In 1918 The democrats lost control of congress that year in a surge which carried the republicans to full command of the national government in 1920. B. Carroll Reece, GOB national chairman, has marked this leaf in tin* political history books in concentrating HHH republican efforts of congressional races.  While Mr. Truman's personal political future thus may be at stake*, la* told his news conference yesterday no specific plans for a speaking tour had born made. He* said he is willing to help out democrats where he can.  He did not know, in* added in response to a question, whether he would speak in New York.   ____  ____ There Senator James Mead may  actuating circuit.    This    circuit does    '  be the  democratic nominee for  not have the    elaborate safeguards    I *°vernor in a contest with Gov.  I Thomas E. Dewey, the 1944 GOB presidential choice.  Mead Still Coy Mead, still coy about the  NKW YORK, July It*. '.I** Brof ll A Kramers, one of the foremo t scientists of the Nethei lands, was elected chairman of the 12 nation scientific and tech lineal committee of the United Nations atomic energy commission at an organization session to day.  Bi of Kramers is on the faculty of tin* University <»f Leyden.  The United States was represented among the scientists and technical experts bv Dr. Richard G Tolman. of the Cnhfomii In stylite of Technology. Ben mg nPDoifitment of a Russian scion list. Andrei A. Gromyko, Russian delegate of the U. N. security council and the atomic energy commission, sat for the Soviet. The other members of the corn-traveling 70 or 75 miles an  rn *bee were:    Australia, Dr. G.  hour, that it passed two other  11 Br *8Ks; Brazil. Capt. Alvaro >f control, swerved ! Albe! to; Canada, Dr. George Lawrence; China. II. R. Wei; Egypt, Col. Mohamed Bey Khalifa; France. Brof. Pierre Auger; Mexico, Luis Badill.i Nervo, Mexican representative on the security council; Poland, Ksawery Pruszynski; United Kingdom, Sir George Puget Thompson.  The scientific and technical advisers of the commission met for the first time as a committee with instructions to devise means for a future exchange of atomic  Tolmadge Wins in Georgia  J seciet I oui til*  for peaceful world.  a  use thiough  I ired but happy, Eugene Talmadge, li ft, smiles as news of his victory rn the Georgia primaries is announced at his Atlanta headquarters. Roy Harm, former speaker of th*- House of Representatives who aided Talmadge rn his rate for governor, share his joy. (NEA Telephoh >.  Stump Speaking Is Popular in Ada During This Week  Talmadge Winner, Says Negroes Won't Vote in Georgia  Committee Issues Subpoena for May; Barkley Testifies  damage or casualties.  Admiral Blandy said tin* exact cause of Hu* premature detonation was not yet determined but that the IOO pound flash bomb was set off entirely differently than the atomic bomb, and tile public should have no fear of danger to personnel participating in next Wednesday’s blast.  He’s Positive  “The atomic bomb positively will not fire prematurely,” In* declared,  The magnesium bomb was mounted on a ship far removed from the vessel which set it off. “The exact cause of this premature flash is not known at present.” Admiral Blandy said, “but it has no significance with respect to the actual atomic bomb since it was operated on the camera  W Cary but search for votes candidates and  vuimaii  then workers an* pushing on now country- ] toward Hie July 23 runoff primary now only four days away.  Interest in Bontotoc county still is warmer in the sheriffs race between Sheriff Clyde Kaiser and Cecil Smith than has developed even in the outcome of a heated gubernatorial campaign.  What happens in the congree sional and state senate races is coming rn for a growing share of attention, however; Cong. Lyle Bonn and his challenger, Glen D. Johnson of Okemah, both spoke here this week.  And Thursday night Al Nichols, VVewoka, state senator, and his opponent Virgil Medlock. Ponto-  Joe Beck, county election board secretary, asks all precinct inspec-at the board’s office or Monday to get sup  ATLANTA. Job 19 I V Red ga I lilied Gene Talmadge of tin* unruly forelocks and the acid I phrase is to be governor *»l Gem unrelenting in their Aha again a fourth time but not  by populai choice.  tors to call Saturday plies and instructions day’s election.  for Tues  Military Transport Plane in (rash  Ten Passengers, Three Crewmen Killed in Tragedy In Konsos  Mis: \* fb  T Ik i i 11  nn..stl> to Oklahoma and cd manager of tin in Saturday ,oid western ; Md!in;  and extreme Sunday.  W e; U I ll  GI 'ODLAND, Ka - . July 19, </P»  \ ( 47 military transport plane  *'ia lied and burned west of here lo ’ night killing IO passengers and thi re crew members.  J I la* era h, not discovered until tin morning, apparently occurr • I di i im* a severe electrical j form which swept this area last J nit*111    Farmers living nearby  said I hex aw a blinding flash in oh* -  vieinitx but thought it was a ; Coit of lightning.  Boa a and parts of the were scattered for about j *• r of a mile around the scene, in a wheat Stubblefield, three miles west and a mile north of tins Western Kansas city.  The plane was on a flight from ropeka. Has, to th** West Coast v itll a stop-over scheduled at b<• ! \ field. Denver. Watches on th** bodies bad stopped at 10:10, indicating th** plane crashed a bout 9 IO p. in. mountain standard time  All the bodies were burned. The clothing on ll of them hav-bcen burned Or blown off.  PONCA CITY? July 19 (/Pi_  j Robert McKorcher has been named manager of th** International eompam property  .    gov  ernorship race, told a reporter: lf I were a candidate this year, I should certainly feel privileged to have the president of the United States in my behalf.”  But some other legislators, with ^tIn* defeat of Senator Burton K Wheeler fresh in mind. were not so sure that presidential aid is the hest political medicine.  U.S. Marines (all Off Hunt for Seven  Will Let Truce Team Negotiate for Release  TIENTSIN. .lull* Bi (ZP) Uni ted State, marines today called **lf their search tor seven mal ines held prisoner by a band of Chinese to permit a truce headquarters team to negotiate for their release.  The marine corps has been scouring th** cc un try north of Chinwangtao since the detachment was captured by a band of 80 armed Chinese* a wack ago. Tile marines, members of a . iii    ,    unit guarding a bridge on th**  lash be• In-Id up until on official PicpinR Mukdrn railway, wore a.i ion could be prepared. taken prisoner in a nearby vill «... force spokesman said no .age where they had nun.- to buy p< rsonnel was anywhere near -  the  1  rice,  J Nationalist sources asserted  toe county state representative challenging Nichols’ hold on the senate post, spoke to a large crowd id voters at Glenwood park.  Dixi** Gilmer, Tulsa, makes his second appearance in Ada on Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock, when he will speak at til** corner of Main and Broadway.  * -  (flange Place For Wafer Safely Film  Show ing of the Red Cross water safety film. “A Highway to Safety." has burn changed to Glim wink) Balk for tonight (Friday) at 8 p.in. The film w ill be shown in conjunct ion with an Army mo \ ii*, according to Dr. Murray Sherbet*. water safety chairman of Bontotoc County Red Cross chapter.  The showing was switched at the last minute to give Adans an opportunity to see what are reputed to In* two exceedingly interesting and entertaining screen shows.  ♦  IOO Here Again  Mokes Two Doys in Row  Mercury Hits Century  Tins paradox could conic only out of Georgia. And it th** fu t time it ha ever happened rn a governor’s race in (georgia, so far las a ny bod \ serin to know j The simple but complicated i fact is that Talmadge won a majority of county unit v«>t<“? in Wednesday’s democratic primary. open for th** fit t time to negroe j who voted in large numbers. But 'th** candidate backed by Gov Ellis Armill. 36 v»*ai old Jam**.* V. Carmichael got a plurality of th** 7OO, OOO-odd votes ca t in th** primary, th** actual election in Georgia.  Rural Areas Dominate  The county unit system, which! was placed on the st.dnt** b.**.k ;, in 1917, is intended to give poll tic.ii dominance to rural Georgia Georgic has 1.19 counties, pm I of them small, and only ;* f<*v. large ! Cities  I 'lh** 410 county unit vol* aiel j arbitrarily assigned. No countv can have less than two. None j more than six A vote in rural Georgia is worth mam tim** th** vote of a person living in Atlanta or Savannah. A candidate iou t j carry a county to get it - unit vote. * Talmadge. running on a plat-1 form calling for restoration «*( th** traditional “white’' primary of th** south that th** I S so picnic court sa \ s must go, is. strong in the rural arca  Generally. Carmichael with the backing of Agnail, w ho sparked | a new liberalism in the south as governor of Georgia, got tin* big city vote as well as th** negro vote, the latter estimated at about IOO.-  1   (too.  Has More Than Enough  Pa I mudgc says negroes won't! vote again in Georgia tor the next four years, even if it means I taking tin* democratic primary (•ut of stat** control and leaving it regulated only by th** party itself.  With returns complete in 151 of the state’s 159 counties, Talmadge had 234 unit vote Onlv JOO are needed for th** nomina lion. Carmichael had 134 unit votes and ex Gov. E. I) Rivers. who ran a poor third, had 18.  I luke (^Kelley, th** font th * anti date, ha*! imn**.  ( armiehaet’s popular Vote lead appeared to be about 10,000. With 1,599 of til** st.de s 1,746 precincts reported, the count was; Carmichael, 307,126; Talmadge 296.751* Rivers, 67.196; () Kelley. ”  on  tub  „ 11.520. The vote was the largest in Georgia’s history and th** vote given Carmichael was the larg* d ever given any gubernatorial can didate.  area of the  mg  Bom a City. Minneapolis.  ll  in  e carne here from  flash bomb ♦  CHICKASHA. July 19. -(/Pi— A record number of 4.198 telephones now are in use rn Chickasha.  Local telephone exchange officials said approximately 135 persons still have apolication on file I for telephones which the company has not been able to install.  the  captors were communists, but Ma J. Gen. Keller E. Rockey, China marine commander, has refused to identify them. Hockey likewise has declined to discuss the search or information on th** safety of the captured men.  *  returns lot* amount in  Greater  * vested. Ada News Want Ads.  The temperature for Thursday, according to the mercury at the Ada Greenhouse, was IOO degrees.  This is th** same figure that was reported for Wednesday and  many an Ada citizen will sw*?ar LAWTON Jul.v Bt I* The to it that Ada was hotter Thins- Law’ton * *»I > council has annotine dav than it was Wednesday. ed it w ill support Police Chief Joe The mercury Thursday night j Cable in an action ricer car, to consented to drop a degree lower enforce ordinances which would than it did Wednesday night, go- j cheek a waste of water here while  I summer consumption is heavy.  mg down to 76 degrees One year ago today Ada citizen; were lolling in 95 degree weather.  If salt is included in their diet, cattle will gain in weight faster.  belaud has more than a hundred volcanoes.  Fire Chief I «*i <»> Julian told thr council that tie water pre mr has been dangerously low in Hic bus in es: ana recently, cleating a serious fire hazard.  *  Greater returns for amount vested. Alia News Want Ads.  in  Rn DO If. I \<4 it I OH NEI I.  WASHINGTON'. Jul.v 19    ( B  rho senate war investigating committee today i ued a sub j poena foi the appearance of Rep Andrew J May, Kentucky demo ( r *d, at it is.u profits investigation into a midwest munition combine.  I he committee has s * < *• 11 »*i I tes timonv that May interceded un behalf of rh** El*** Basin Metal Broduct company . rid allied firms that got some $78,000,000 in ' war conli ai t  May ha s.,id m public state  i  merit . that h** did not profit pn on .lh . that he w a tor rely sri v -. mg the u .u effor t and doing what all othei congressmen had done.  Chairman Mead (I) NY) of th** investigating committee read the j constitutional restriction <>r\ a**-rest of members of senate or I house during a si sum, except on treason, felony or breach of peace j chai ge:  Then he said  ‘I h*- co mini f ire expects ( j gee sman May to r» pn f this : poena.”  May had indicated last week h«* fl ight appear before th** committee voluntarily if it would gi\e him tic i ight to call or cross examine witnesses or subpoena records. The committee refused to acred** to such term  < ommitter Means Business In issuing th** subpoena bn May appeal anre Senator FVtgu "ii * Ii Midi) remarked it should !>*• made cleat that th** committee i "going t.» take all the steps the eon titution allow to bring the house member before it  May is chairman of the house military committee  Bi'*fore it carne up with the May subpoena, the committee heard Rep. Sa ha th (I) 111) testify that two or three times he had called th** Wa hmgton office of th** combine but only to get a third for a pinochle game Sa hat Ii tol« I th** senate Wat in v e.stigating committee, how over, that he never had been asked to help the group get war contracts lh* faid he merely had played I pinochle a few times w ith Murray Garsson or Joseph F. Freeman. Washington representative of the Erie Basin Metal Products com puny, Batavia Metal Product* company and affiliated firm in ai outfit whit Ii got some $78,000,  I Obi! m w ai nj dei  Eailier, th** democratic leaders I of both senate and lions** <h^ fclanned any dealings with the combines hington agency. Barkley Never Was Asked Senator Barkley said he never had been asked to help get con trois and had nevei personally telephoned the Washington offio* of Et ie Batavia Rep McOormack (Mas* ) s, ii * I he never had made a call to the Washington agency en received one from it  Murray Garsson. an active fig in** in the combine, once served •is an investigate] for a house committee, headed by Sabath, which inquired into bondholders protective committees.  Sabath said he thought perhaps had played pinochle onlv once with Murray Garsson and two *>i fbi ce tunes with Freeman He said either he or former Rep I , Samuel Dick ton of New Y*»i k h.i«l called oil (K’casion to get a  i (Continued on Bago 2, Column 2) J  he  (IO Calls For Buyer Strike  Demondt New Round Of Wogc Increases; Action Dims OPA BiH‘» Chances  Hi ER \N( is vt i f \|%Y  WASHINGTON* J u!    19  I>rm«H i .itic Ll    Bari  < K \ i * od today a s confr rem e committee  mat.  ha«i  on gi  t.  > f< u an  in. * omi  rnent *»n th* revival bill “B doe sn t ; ley told I ej about chances of on tii.* senate approv w Inch adm in is ti atmo air '‘eking to revise mu ted object!*>n ft  j Ti unum  Bat k I*    sail I    a pi <»  I ed bv a uh ommitte* Senator Radcliffe ( provide for the res I price ceilings on tx exempted by th* such rough forn  OBA  od J* Hardshell asked agreement d measure lieutenants f> meet re-Br* 1 !.dent  po*.*! draft-* headed bv D Md > to tora lion of la jot items senate was in that the com  bo progress in con-  mitter mad* siderrng it.  ll* 1  hinted at a possible compromise by which the decision on returning commodities to OPA control might be given to the civilian production administration. | H** .od this would eliminate contention that th** OBA would be arbitrary in ifs decisions  OPA Revival ( fiances Dimmed  The prospects for an OPA regnal hit a ra w low as the CIO called for a national buyers* ! strike and a new round of J increase.  ( hap man Spent ** < f) K > of j the house banking committee I told n*'V. men “the prospects ar*;  dark for th»* restoration of effect*  | iv e pi a e control ” i Hi comment came after sen-late members of the joint cottfer-Ien* e committee seeking an OPA compromise i ejected a house pro-  age  mai  Taft  P“ ti to ran ok** the ban on any future so* h et items a cheese.  Brat The sr a count!  was being dr af ti can dominated s Also defeated b late \* dei day wa revive the Taft rn  amendment m The original p: t Senator Taft (R  sent ml • milk  Dow ii  na ti ti h r plop.  ag:  *d  ib  senate b ceilings ket bas I, eggs i.  Proposal  d to pres. Hi ay But ' a Repul  YimiCtee  fttr-  md  t  rn  em pi idustrial pct* modified lo 'tnt formula  Ohm) bore  res I til mg  TTT .  bv  Truman’s ire original OPA  esse  Hts  brunt of Br* a dent I in his v to of th** ext* n .«*n bdl  Meanwhile, there were j other fast moving develop «*n th** OPA economic lab r  ft nill  I The CIO exec utive board de-• i*u mg fhat price increases since OBA di*'d June 30 have wiped out th.*' pay raises v.on bv labor this year. called upon Mr Truman to a* rang** a labor-management conference fen the presentation of demands for n *w wage boost The CR > said essential living costs have jumped 40 per cent in the two month 25 per cent in the last two weeks  Shipbuilding Deferred  - Mr Truman asked f,,r m y cat 'n p* i t pone rnent of a multimillion dollar pie **nger shipbuilding job in order to conserve fed. I al fund ..nd shot t materials and to I emovt* some of the pressure on the price of materia!.*! A statement said the most decisive Lictor “is ba* possibility that congress will fail t.» extend effective pi it’** controls ’ The maritime com rn ( -ion announced immedi-•delv that it would comply with the recommendation  3 The bureaus of labor statists f#.i 900 commodity wholesale price* showed a three p**: rent in-   ct  «*/ luring the v** ended  July IU, i i mg I.* 120 7 per < **n;   1  >f file    average    up seven  per t ent for July and 14 per cent since th*- end of til** war la ,t Aug-  (Continued on Page 2 Column 2,  TH'  PESSIMIST  M* llnh ItlitMk*. Jr.  It’s a din git t’gether table or a s I’ git t’gethi  (»i .sn’ma she ain’t takin fly in  she don’t v  chances kno v*. m  n s.ght easier t* at th' banquet peakin’ than it is  •r at th’ polls.  — • €'X> -  Lark. who says here f* r long, is eSNOftS. I HT a use nt t I.ike anv  in thi torture how it feelj I  o not fly.   

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Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

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