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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 18, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 18, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             During the present Oklahoma campaigning a candidate has additional reasons for claiming that he is "wearing no man's collar" for any wearing of collars is discouraged by July weather. A x trace Net Juiir I Mid (.Ire tila I ton 8310 Mr m brr Audit Burr nil of I.'I re illation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 4urd 79 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Brazilian Is New Head Of Atomic Board EvoM'i Succcsior Would Like to Outlaw All War As Well 01 Atomic War NEW YORK. July Alvaro Alberto, Brazilian ji.-ivy scientist and explosives ex- formally look over tin: rhair- of the I'nitcd Nations   draft boards lo take men 3.9 through 29.) 3. "youth's" si ill" in Higli school can get deferred. Not so college youths. If culled, they won't be allowed lo finish out a.quarter or their draft boards make some special exceptions in individual cases. Dependents Won't Help 4. Fathers will not be drafted, nor will men considered extreme hardship cases. man will not he deferred because of de- pendiMiU. 5. Every man in tho 19-29 age group who now has an occupa- tional deferment will be re-ex- amined. The rule here is very lough. Selective service told the boards not to defer anyone unless he is "indispensable and -irreplaceable to the national existence." (This means that almost no one now will have an occupation that can be considered deferable.) '6. But farm .workers still will get; the same special consideration .Ihey gol through the war. A special sec- tion of draft law provides for them. (Which means: Deferment for farm workers undoubtedly will be greater than for any other of work in this country.) 7. Draft boards will review the cases of men J9 th'roiiRh 20 who have been, found physically unfit for military service. (Which means: Some men now excused from military service be- cause of poor physical condition will find themselves drafted, if doctors think, they've improved enough to fit requirements.) No Age Du.suil 13, There's no quota system'bas- ed on .For instance: 'Draft, boards wTll. take whom they can in the group 19-29, and not try to pick just so many of one age, so many of another. Draft boards will consider drafting war veterans if (a) They have not served outside the Uni- ted Stales and (b) had less lhan ;six months military service. (Which means: 'if. a iv.nn served less than six months, but served them in the United Stales, and was then discharged, his draft, board may draft hhrragain, (1.1! a mun had been in the ser-; vice only 2 days or 2 month's-1 or 'any length of time less than months but had been on duly only as fur as three miles outside I the continental limits of the he wouldn't drafted.) OPA Elbowed Aside by Two Other Items Rights, Price Of Silver Delay Getting Around to Conference Study By FRANCIS M. LE MAY WASHINGTON, July "got elbowed out of the legislative picture today by un- related fights over women's rights and the price .ot silver, Senator Barkley the dem- ocratic leader, told reporters a showdown on attempts to write a compromise price control bill that President Truman will sign is un- likely before tomorrow. Yesterday's session ot the sen- ate-house conference committee considering the measure produced a lot of talk and no little confu- sion. It finally broke up for lack of a quorum as Senators drifted away to debate a bill proposing a constitutional amendment to guarantee women equal rights with men. That debate goes on today. Silver Hearing In Way Also, before the conferees can get back to the subject of OPA they planned another effort to break a weeks' long deadlock over senale-house differences on the price of silver. A price engage- ment will keep Barkley away from any afternoon OPA session. Hence prospects are dim for an agreement today. No votes were taken yesterday on any part of the senate bill, which Mr. Truman has hinted strongly he will veto if it lands on his desk with its current bans on price ceilings for meat, butter, eggs, niilk and several other gro- cery items. However, house conferees were reported waiting only for a pro- pitious moment, to propose to the senators that they back down on the food list amendments. Mr. Truman was represented in some capitol quarters as ready to over- look other objections if the price .lid is put back on the market basket. i Tempers Are New Evidence Found By Profits Probers Hot But even in Ihe absence of any parliamentary maneuvering with- in the conference, .tempers ap- parently got hot. Senator Tobey (R-NH) emerg- ed, from the committee room de- claring "the house conferees want to talk, but won't take any posi- tion. The time has come to fish or cut: bait." Senator Taft whose pricing amendment in Ihe veloed bill was roundly criticized by Ihe president, held firm against a compromise. "Let the president veto it if he wants he said. The Ohioan served nolice he will ask the conference to erase from the bill the discretionary power given OPA in applying the new pricing formula. This form- ula was written by Barkley as a substitute for the provision Mr. Truman objected to. lariiKuilingTs" Back in Limelight Followup for Loon to Brit- ain Involves Listing of Items for Duty Cut WASHINGTON, July cutting took tlie top spol today on this country's program for expanding global trade. a quick followup to the loan' to Britain, some 30 or more inter departmental committees are al work within the government'drafting lists of thou- sands oC commodities on which lower import duties will be con- sidered. Under authority of the 1934 Trade Agreements act renewed lust year, the, administration can slash present tariffs as much as 50 percent, provided American industries arc not jeopardized by the culs. These reductions, however, will Russia Pat On Austrian Deal Rejects British, American Protests of Seizure of Prop- erty for Reparations Hy ROMNEV WHEELER LONDON, July IS, has rejected United Stales and British representations on seizure of Austrian properly for repara- tions, a high authority said to- day. In a lengthy nole handed the Austrian government, the Soviet occupation authorities in Austria were said to have made it plain that there is no change in their recent position in regard to seiz- ure of worth of Aus- trian .industrial plants and other property confiscated by the Ger- mans followim; ihe Anschluss in 1938. The lexl of the note was not available in London but ils essen- tial points were known to auth- oritative sources, which said it disagreed with almost every point set forth in American and British representations. The controversy arose July 6 when the Soviet command in Austria announced the property in eastern Austria had passed in- to Soviet ownership along with all other "German external as- sets" in the Russian zone. The United States disputed this interpretation in the allied coun- cil, asserting that property forcib- ly confiscated by Ihe Germans af- ter 1938 could not. be classified as German under the Potsdam agreement. The Americans also set forth that Ihey considered industrial plants and other assets, built un- der German orders by Austrian labor tmcl with inflated Austrian funds, belong rightfully to Aus- trian .economy. Britain subsequently backed the American contention and both nations made representa- tions lo the Soviet command. The Russians previously hod rejected Austrian protests. The Soviet seizures include certain oil fields northeast nf Vienna. To Be 'Weapon' Underwater Blast Expected To Turn Them Into Mighty Battering Ram By DON ABOARD THE U.S.S. APPA- LACHIAN, July J8. The underwater atomic bomb explo- sion is expected lo turn Bikini la- goon's blue waters into a mon- strous battering ram powerful enough to crumple the steel sides of old battleships. The structural damage to the 75 -target ships set up for the mighty blast July 25 (July 24. U. S. time) is a matter of keenest interest lo scientists flnd naval ar- chitects. Lt. Commander Norman My- rick, member of the task force.1, emphasized at a press conference several possible kinds of damage. These included holes in the sides of ships, destruction of ships' machinery, rteel plates wrenched loose and hurled as pro- jectiles, violent shaking of the ships, fires and radioactivity. While the ships in the July 1 mid-air atomic bonlb explosion were subjected to heat and blast, vessels in test. "Raker" will be punished by tin undersea shock creating sudden and violent stresses and strains. The most modern vessel in the target fleet is the German cruiser Prinz Eugen. The most modern SECRETARY TESTIFIES Jean Bates, a former .sec- retary in the Washington office the Erie Basin Metal Products Co., lakes stand in Washing- Hearing May Be Reopened Senate Committee to De- cide on How to (act Cong. May, Gartton to Tettify Ity JOHN W. 1IKNDKR5ON WASHINGTON, July senate war investigating committee reported today that it has uncovered "new evidence" in its war profits inquiry into a mid- v.-esl munitions combine. The "new evidence1" delayed a committee decision on what steps it might take in hailing Chairman May (D.-Ky.) of the house mili- tary committee before it for a public explanation of ilis activi- ties in connection with the com- bine. The committee met for more than an hour brhind closed doors for a "general discussion" of pos- sible steps. Two written invitations already have been sent to him by Chair- man Mead (D.-NYJ to appear "voluntarily." But he has laid down conditions for thnt appear- ance among them the right to cross examine witnesses and sum- mon tho commit- tee ha.s refused to accost. May Denies Profit May has acknowledged that he aided the Illinois industrial com- bine during the war years, but has insisted that aid wns for the war effort alone, and has denied that he profiled personally. Yesterday the commiUoo hoard testimony that he oner asked an official of the combine: "What about that As the close of today's execu- tive session, Francis Flanagan of committee counsel announced the discovery of the new evidence, but flatly refused to disclose to reporters even an "inkling" of its nature or who it involved. Not Satisfied On (iiirsson He acknowledged that it might involve the reopening of public hearings. Mead, who brought public hearings to a tumultuous end yes- terday, said the committee also will   Classified Ails. OKLAHOMA CITY, July 18, Fraker, ''slate Ameri- can Legion said today a special train would' leave here Sept. 26 to take Oklahoma dele- gates to the National Legion con- vention at San "Francisco Sept. 30 through Oct. 3. Fraker said the train would in- clude at least 12 pullman cars. Reservations, he added, may be made by contacting him at the stale Legion office in the histori- cal building. present plans call for a Id-nation conference to write a single com- pact covering not only tariff du- ties but other trade barriers in the form of quotas, preferences and subsidies. .Preparations for this conference are regarded by officials here as the beginning of the second stage in long-range. American plans to raise international living standard by freeing and expanding com- merce. The first step was the British lion, finally approved only this week after nearly a year of nego- tiation and congressional debate. The'' initial advance under the loan a item was scheduled to be made available today through the federal reserve bank of New York. CHICKASHA, July Eighty-five yoiing people from Christian churches over the state are attending the' Southwestern Oklahoma Christian conference on the Oklahoma College for Women campus here this week. The Rev. Carol Fairbanks, Enid, is dean and the Rev. Oran Coble. Elk City, director. crumble some The bomb will be touched by 'Dr. Marshall Hollo navy "may off way, young Cornell physicist, from a secret ship in the waiting fleet outside Bikini lagoon. The bomb will be detonated anywhere from la to 120 feel be- low the lagoon's surface but. the exact depth is a United Stales secret. ton to testify before the Mead Committee in connection with the investigation of a number of midwest munition firms for war profiteering. Mrs. Bales committee that during her em- ployment with Die company, Senator Alben Barkley, Democrat from Kentucky, Andrew J. May, Democrat from Kentucky, called the office several times. Political Rallies This Week Turning On Vote Heat Here The air is being stirred mightily this week in Ada by political campaigners and sufficient inter- est has developed in the outcome ________ of next Tuesday's runoff primary the committee is "not satis- thai good crowds are attending. with Gnrsson's statement Wednesday night Cong. Lyle Boron spoke on the courthouse lawn to a siy.eablc audience, de- fending vigorously his record in i and renewing charges in connection with ----_. Garsson and May. Testimony concerning May's inquiry about was offered yesterday by Mrs. Eleanor Hall, one of two pretty ex-secretaries of the combine's Washington of- fice who sprinkled the commit- tee's record with references to members of congress and high- ranking army officers. 11ENNKSSKY, July Charles Tilterington, president of the lU-nnessey Whisker club, has announced tin- club plans to re- sume its annual Labor Day week- end c e 1 e b r a t i on, discontinued through the war The festivities will open AUK. 31 with registration of and returned veterans and a big am- ateur rodeo. in.- Dr. Carl Conner. MuskoRi-o superintendent of .schools, will deliver the summer ment. address to 80 seniors at Northeastern Stale college here July Dr. Conner, like speak- ers at the three preceding sum- mer commencements, is a former student at the college. MUSKOGEE, July 18 OP) John N. Hewitt, National Service officer, has announced the Dis- abled American Veterans organi- zation will hold a three-day state convention at Okmulgcc, begin- ning next Friday. congress because of his stand against labor racketeering1. Tuesday night his runoff rival. Glen D. Johnson. Okemah attor- ney, had spoken to a similar au- dience in a sizzling attack on Bor- en's record. Tonight at 8 o'clock at Glen- wood Park Al Nichols, Wewoka, state senator, will speak at a poli- tical rally and Virgil Merlloek. Ponlotoc county slate representa- tive, his runoff opponent, said Wednesday morning that he would return from Seminole in time to reply. Each has beep challenging the other to debate in their respective counties. Dixie Gilincr. Tulsa candidate for the democratic governor nom- ination Hoy J. Turner, makes his final personal appear- ance in Ada Saturday. 100 Degrees Here Officiol Temperature Fin- ally Gets Up to Century Mark for Ada The nally temperature reached the in Ada fi- 100 degree MUSKOGEE, July Edwin H. Alford, fornler report- er and photographer on the Mus- kogee Phoenix and Times-Demo- crat, has accepted a position in the public relations division of the Southwestern Power Admin- istration in Tulsa. Alford was dis- charged from the army in Decem- ber, 1945, after Pacific service. PONCA CITY, July Members the American .Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars are planning a V-J Day celebration here Aug. 14 in commemoration of the end of World War Two. W. D. Pfeiffer is general chairman of the event. mark. On what seemed to be -one of the days to Ada citizens, tlie government owned mercury soared to 100 degrees fahrenheit. It seamed to most people thai the leniperature was waving around llie ill) mark as it was a year when Aria experienced a sudden drop in the heat. With Tuesday's leniperature at 08 de- grees, it was up 2 degrees for Wednesday. The low for Wednesday night was 77 degrees, around which minimum temps for the night have been hovering for the past week'. Read the Ada News Want Ads, FA1RV1EW. July 18. Eighteen major county watermel- on growers have formed the Oklahoma Black Diamond Seed association. The group will mar- ket their first certified seed next spring'. MUSKOGEE, July ]H. William H. Landram, assistant United Stales district attorney, has resigned to enter the legal de- partment of the Veterans Admin- istration center here. Landram formerly served as county judge of. Marshall county at Madill. TH' PESSIMIST IIv llnl, IIUaLl, Jr. Ther' wuz 'n ol' lady who lived in a you guessed, she wuz payin' three prices fer it, too. Poise these days is kcepin' a poker e x p r e s s i o n somebody asks you If UT butter.   

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