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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 9, 1946 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 9, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             There's folk every election about some candidate trying to 'buy' enough votes but the average voter has to take someone's word for never sees any of the cash that is under discussion Net June I'.ilil circulation 8310 Mrmbrr: Audit Iiurcnii of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 72 Four Yanks Vanish In Soviet Zone Russions Silent on Their Whercobouts; May Have Them Under Arrest BERLIN'. July Am- erican invstt'.'.-itor said tonight that "rrinlart had been mmlo" v.ith tin- about Wiirrant C'ffu-i-r JUKI Mrs. Samuel llar- ;son. two the four who 'Jisappr'jit-i-d in (he Soviet oc- i-unation zone week. He to divulge details but indicated Dial U. S. officials had been of tin; San An- tonio. Tt-x. couple's whereabouts. Tlie inv  Erie Basin Metal Products company included 213 of "liquor and miscellaneous gifts" in costi- charged aRainst government war contract s in The gifts ho told the senate war investigating committee, included Berkley Calls Meat-Paul- try Exemption Key Of New Ceilings Move SEEKS VOTE TONIGHT Wherry Hopes for Approval Of Amendment as Blow At Black Markets By JACK BEU, WASHINGTON. July OPA's beii-Hpircd supporters all but COP juried today that tho son- ite will vote to keep meat free from any revived price controls. Democrn.ic Leader B a r k i e y (Ky) drove toward a test Pesky. Walker Cooper beat -out ex-Caotain Orl Moline testified six pen and pencil sets costing! lime tonight on an amendment each nnd two cigarette i by Senator Wherry (R-Neta) to lighters. exempt mea1 and poultry pro- Asked who received the gifts, ducts from the compromise; bill to reestablish the price agency. The suggested rules of proce- dure will be drafted this morn- ing by the deputy ministers and are slated to be ratified by the ministers this afternoon. The ministers then are scheduled to ratify their final agreements on Italian, reparations, thus clearing the slate for discussion of the German question. Speculation on the nature of the "important declaration" on Russia's policy toward Germany ran from one .extreme to .an- other. Some sources.-said :Russia a hit. Marion struck out. Pas- that "information was requested" The Ken'uckian called Wherry's seau was called out on strikes. No on this point "hut never obtained" amendment the key issue in a runs, one hit, no errors, one left, .from the company. I campaign !o major foods off Americans: Vernon rolled out, Marion to Mize. Keltner worked Passeau for a walk. Hayes lined to Marion, who whipped the ball to Mize in time to nip Kelt- ner off No runs, no hits, no errors, none left. Third Inning Nationals: Schoendienst flied out to Williams. Musial popped to Doerr. Hopp flied to DiMaggio, No runs no hits, no errors, none left. Americans: Luke Appling bai- ted for Feller and bounced out. Passeau to Mixe. Dimaggio sing- led, Pesky rapped into a double play, Schoendionsl to Marion to Mize. No runs, one hit, no errors, none left. Fourth Inning: Nationals: Hal Nowhouser went in, to pitch for the American. Ro sar was catching and Spence was in center field. Walker went out. Vernon to Newhouser. Kurowski ;iwung at a third strike. Frank McCormick butted for Mize and flied out to Spence. No runs, no ho errors none left. Americans: Kirby Higsbe went to the for the Nationals eUand sS'in ins. McCori establishing a central administra- I WHli.n smn'bnH WM hS" t VP Williams smashed a hoir.e run tive organization within .a fed- eralized Germany. Others said the Russians would denounce Britain and the United conducting "secret negotiations behind the Soviet Union's back "Secret Talks" Denied Tass, the official Russian news agency, has accused the two west- ern Allies of engaging in private conversations on Germanv to into cenlerfielrt bleachers. Keller Out on strikes. Doerr fouled out n i.1 trilut; III tits nOS- u' u -o pital room yesterday against doc- Minister V. M tors' orders remained on duty SOme reason was Thp imarH's not invited. The guard's instructions, issued A j by-physicians, were to let no one sources i denied that tn-power "secret talks" on Germany were going on in Paris "to the exclusion of The 41-year-old producer of "Hell's Angeis" and "The Out- law" crashfd his XF-11, photo- reconnaissance plane reportedly the fastest long-range craft yet built, intt three houses and a gar- age in Beverly Hills, he smashed his way put of the plastic-covered cockpit in lirr.e to escape death in the flames which destroyed the craft, and remained conscious long enough to announce himself at the hospital. m str.i-.-p and the neerly re- Smith agamst Sheriff Clyde Kni-I without." scr: there; is also the race in Dis- The message said it was their considered judgement thai the C.'.inese government was improp- handling UNRRA supplies and services. trict 2 between George Collins, county commissioner, and Bob Austell for Collins' place. Head the Ada News Want Ads. WEATHER and Wednesday fair to- cxccpt. storms northwest late Wednesday, continued warm. 9-12 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska Showers and thunder storms beginning Nc- brasica Thursday, occurring over of district Friday, Saturday and Sunday except Nebraska Sat- urday and Sunday: rain fall av- eraging 2 inches eastern Nebras- ka, eastern Kansas and northern Missouri to 1 inch .western Ne- braska, western Kansas, southern Missouri and northeastern Okla- homa and inch western and southern Oklahoma; continued warm and humid Wednesday and Thursday except cooler Nebras- ka Thursday and most of re- mainder of district Friday and Saturday: temperatures averag- ing about f> degrees above normal most of district. Lords Duck Issue, Vote with Commons LONDON, July 9, long- expected clash between the labor government and the predom- inantly conservative house of lords was averted yesterday when the peers defeated a motion by Lord Beveridgc to include the Friendly Societies in the govern- ment's new social security sys- tem. The house of commons, on the government's insistence, pre- viously had voted to exclude the p r i v a t e non-profit insurance Compromise Plan On Terminal Pay President Approves Method For Payment in Bonds And Cash to Veterans WASHINGTON, July 9, The _ While. House sa'id today President Truman has proposed a compromise plan to use govern- ment bonds, as well as cash, in paying approximately war veterans -for accumulated furlough time. The plan, Press Secretary Eben Ayers told a news conference, is the president's own idea. Under it, veterans who served in the ranks would get cash for all ter- Final Meeting For Jaycees Announced Ada Jaycees are invited to at- tend this week's meeting as the last one before a summer vacation and also because of the nature of the program. It is to a fellowship meeting, entirely informal, with refresh- ments. It will begin at 8 o'clock Wednesday night at Jaycee Hall. Jaycees will not meet further until the first Wednesday in Sep- Russia." French, British and American coal .technicians are negotiating to increase Germany's coal output, they said, but. U. S. Ambassador Jefferson C a f f e r y has. kept the Russian ambassador, Alexandre Bogomolov, advised on the progress of these talks. Weather Turns To July Conditions Hot and Humid Now, No Hint of Rain Like Drench- ing Downpour of Year Ago Ada citizens experienced a day of true July weather Monday with the temperature climbing to 96 degrees. A year ago yesterday the thermometer showed only 94 dropped to 65 during the night while Monday's low was 77. Everyone .was in shirtsleeves, or less, yesterday as a warm breeze was all that moved in. Sweat added to the humidity al- ready in the atmosphere. Drug stores and air conditioned shops got more than their share of bus- iness from over heated customers .A year ago last (Monday) night, Ada and the state as a whole got a sudden drenching from rains which tho bvSrfPrnnSpa weather off C a few daysFrom a-m, until 7 a.m. on the morT tember. Patrolman Arrests Driver from Idabel William Allen Jarvis of Idabel am on man. Charges of violation of the ing of July 9 tnV rules of th, road No. 1 were filed waVso ar o groups. The iiouse of lords expected to support Lord Bevcr- i a minal leave payments less thanixrw VA HOSIPITAT Tr" ssn iinri tnc i "orllAL AT idge despite a threat by labor parly leaders (hat they would not wipe few remaining law making powers if they obstructed labor's program. Tho Friendly Societies, with a membership of more than 000, have been demanding that they be made "government agents" in the national insurance program which will provide low cost medical, unemployment, old age and other benefits. five-year bonds in ROHFRS had been Denominations for 1 a r g I r j CITY July of the cost in the Franklin BourianTlS rSJf Is of peace court Tuesday morning, j not even a hint weather mUCh .last rate of speed. The arrest was I4-.JI It T oi Ada on Highway KCO KCO KOSC 10 Meet at P. M. A change in the time of the meeting of the Red Red Rose to- night has beep announced. The Grand Old Man will arrive at Norris Stadium at o'clock in- stead of at the later hour that was first announced. Patrolman Ciark said that Jar- vis was weaving in and but of traffic causing at least one car to leave the highway to avoid an accident. a oH? lion hospital at Will.Rogers field. tionccl by Senator Edwin C. .Johnson (D-Colo) who first dis- closed the plan to reporters. Johnson said it was advanced by the budget bureau, which speaks for the .president. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. has been brought a step closer. While no opening date has been set. Dr. C. W. Bates, manager of the veterans hospital, said "every effort is being made to open as soon as possible." The entire hospital must first be scrubbed, sterilized and aired, he pointed out. Vernon flied out to one hit, no err- ors, none left. Fifth Inning Nationals: Stephens in at short for the Americans, Gordon was on second, York on first and Stirn- weiss at third. Masi out, Stephens to York. Marion flied to Keller. Higbe swung at a third strike. No runs, no hits, no errors, none left. Americans: Stirnweiss struck out. Rosa'- singled. Newhouser singled, sending Rosar to third, and took second on throw in. Spence was purposely passed, loading the bases. Stephens doub- led, scoring Rosar and Newhouser. Williams singled, scoring Spence and sending Stephens to third. Ewell Blackwell relieved Higbe. Keller raoped to McCormick, who fired the ball to Masi at the plate. and Stephens was run down, Masi to. Kurowski. Williams and Kell- er advanced on a wild pitch. Marion thi-fw out Gordon. Three runs, four hits, no errors, two left. Sixth Inning: Nationals: Gubtine batted for Schoendienst. He struck out. Del Ennis batted for Musial and whiffed. Lowery batted for Hopp and singled. Walker fouled to Rosar. No runs, one hit, no err- ors, one left. Americans: Gustine was at sec- ond for the Nationals, Ennis in left field, Lowery in centerfield and Slaughter in right. York singled. Stirnweiss forced'him at second. Rosar forced Stirnweiss. Bill Dickey batted for Newhouser. He was struck out. No runs, one hit, no errors, one left. Seventh Inning Nationals- Jack Kramer took the mound. Hal Wagner catching and Sam Chapman in centerfield. Kurowski flied out to Chapman. Phil CavareUa struct out, Masi bounced out. 'No runs, no hits, no errors, none left. Americans: CavareUa was on first base. Chapman flied out to Lowery. Marion 'took Stephens' sizzler and threw him out. Will- iams .-scratched a single. Keller drew a walk. Gordon lashed a double, scoring Williams and George H. Knutson, a member the lists of anv new ceilings that of the war department price ad- j may be fixed, justment board, told the com- mittee thai the amount claimed by the company for the gifts was disallowed. Something: New Added Knutson said ne could remem- ber of no other case in which liquor had been charged as a cost of war contracts. He added that the war depart- ment considered nominal charges for entertainment and gifts to be n IcgiUmate cost of doing busi- ness, pnrliuilnrly when in connec- tion with oblnining materials from suppliers The Erie Basin company is one of a group of munitions makers which is under investigation by the senate committee. Knutson said the Erie bill for Barklcy Won't Predict Barkley declined to predict outcome of this scheduled first vole. But Senator Murdock (D- Utah.) said he expects several democrats from the western cat- tle country to join with a large majority of the republicans in gifts included cases and "oihcr were used Moline listed .sticks, vanity presents that. several charges for liquor, including one bill of for 100 cases of various liquors. He said that some of the liquor was purchase, i by the Interstate Machinery company. Inc., an af- filiate of tr.e Erie company and (Continued on Page 2. Column 3) Soap Box Derbyists Race July 20 On South Broadway Entrants in the All-American Soap Box Derby will race on the South Broadway Saturday support of ment. Wherry amend- As early debate revolved i.-hiefly nrouii-' meal controls. Chi- rcporlecl another clay of sharply maiketings Mon- day with rattle and hog prices generally upward. To a comention by Jack Krnnis, president of the National meat in- dustry council, that largo packers were Hiking OPA beef ceil- ings by 12 cents a pound, spokes- men for S'A'ift and Armour com- panies said th..-y had simply add- ed the amount of government sub- sidies, which had averaged about five cents o pound. These subsidies, designed to keep retail pi ices down, expired with OPA. The Wlierry Amendment Wherry's amendment provides: "No maximum price and no regulation or order under this act or the stahiliz. lion act of 13-42, as amended, be applicable with respect to livestock, poultry, or eggs, or food or feed products, pro- cessed or manufactured in whole or substantial part from livestock, poultry or eggs." Wherry said he feels confident the senate will approve the pro- posal because it is tired of black: markets and thinks there ought to be a test in which some corn- afternoon, July' 20, according to i "Jiodity is left frcJe to seek its corn- officials of the local race. pclitivi; pn-.-e level on the market. The winner will receive a trip to Akron, Ohio, with all expenses paid and on arrival there will be given a wrist watch. Barhley F.-ars Experiment But BarHey criticized what he called this "guinea pig" idea. The total number of contestants Leaving the controls off one com- who have made enlry in the race is 11, but additional entries are expected this week as the race will be run iust one week from Saturday. Racing helmets are available to boys who entered the race. They can be obtained at The News office any lime this week. Only two contestants have cd for helmets so far. modity miahl be all right, he said. But he added that he feared the experiment would widen, with non-contro1 RI owing as it fed on such a major item of the Ameri- can diet. As Bark I y saw it. n victory fop Ihe Wlierr.v amendment might open tho way to a flood of decon- all- j pn-.pos ,1s. The Nebraska sen- ator held in reserve an amend- Medals have been received for I "lent to keep ceilings off dairy the first, second and third win-1 products. Senator Moore (R- ners in each division in addition Okla) and nine others sought to to a medal for the best designed eliminate pet; oleum controls, so car. The owner of the best up- long as supply meets domestic de- holstered car will receive a pen mands. and pencil set. l If meat goes out, it was Moore's A check-up will be made later reasoning mat oil probably would this week to determine if all the boys entered have built racers and plan to enter the race. Boys who are wanting sponsors can find them among the business men of Ada. too. and Murdock held hat no matter how Water Cut-Off To Be Brief Here Gene Klepper, water superin- tendent, doesn't expect any water scarcity to develop during a brief period tonight when the supply from a pump station to the stand- pipe will be cut off. At midnight the cut off will be put into effect so that a new mo- KSSZ ion. Two runs, two hits, no errors. But Barklc to the hope many exceptions tho senate ap- proves now, they may be able to sidetrack them in compromising differences with the house and bring bac.: almost intact the mea- which they are starting to vote on. Tho somili? last month voted to free meat, n.-iiry products, tobacco and pctrohuim from controls, but those clauses were knocked out by the senate-house conferenca committee. The Australian ground parrol never aligl.ts in trees. one left. Eighth Inning Nationals: Marion struck out. Lamanno out, Gordon to York. Gustine walked. Ennis struck out. No runs, no hits, no errors, one lelt. Americans: Rip Scwell went in to pitch for the Nationals. Stirn- weiss singled into left field. Wag- ner flied out to Lowery. Kramer singled, sending Stirnweiss to third. Chapman' flied out to Low-, ery, Stirnweiss scoring after, the i o water vvill be available in the slandpipe if lake care of more than normal needs during the two hours needed for the tie-in and for a time beyond that. This is .first visit of the Grand OH Man for several years, and faithful members, narking back to those pre-war years, are expected to turn out in a large number, Bringing with them a goodly number of neophytes for induction into the mysteries of the order. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Classified Ads. Editor Is Elected Elks Exalted Ruler NEW YORK, July 9, Charles E. Broughton, editor and ......._.publisher of the Sheboygan, Wis.. catch. Stephens scratched a sin- j press, today was elected grand gle. Williams hit a home run into the right Held bullpen, scoring Kramer and Stephens ahead of him. Keller fouled out to Masi. Four runs, four hits, no errors, none left. Ninth Inning: Nationals: Lewery out Steph- ens to York. Stephens threw out Slaughter Vervan batted for Kurowski and fouled out to Wag- (Continued on Page 2, Column 3) exalted ruler of the benevolent and protective order of Elks. Broughton. a member of the order for 43 years and chairman of the board of grand trustees be- fore election to the new post, succeeded Wade H. Kepner of Wheeling. W. Va., as leader of Elks affiliated with lodees. The election was held at the order's first national convention since before World War 2. "Shucks, ever'body knows whut a lieutenant-command- er remarked Miss Fanny Frail, "a lieutenant's wife." You can't expect f keep friends if you're allus givin' 'em away.   

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