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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 3, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 3, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             It's a good thing that folks don't make as much noise as do tires when they are being Oklahoma today would be one vast hissing noise as futile political hopes go flat Airrait .Nrt Mav I'jlrt (.Imilallim 8271 Mrmb .-r: Audit llur r-tu ot t'lrcuUUon THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 6S ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE DRISKILL, HUNT WIN OVER INCUMBENTS Turner Far In Lead For Governor Gilmer Nears Run-Off Spot Pulling Slowly Ahead Of Jones as Late Returns Come in from Over Store OKLAHOMA CITY, July re-turns from 3-176 nf 3701 in Oklahoma for- democratic governor: Giln.er fiflTlfl; Jones 7. P0.27H. OKLAHOMA CITY. July :i.   Ciihncr, '1'ulsa county p.'.'M-cutor, fnrgi-d alicad of for- mer internal revenue collector H. C'. Jones lodav for a place in the runoff tin- Oklahoma rnatoriol nomination as lin- r.f.'ifial returns from Gilmer's fi.-onghnlds soured in. Despite Gilmer's surge. Turner v.'ns far ahead in the race L'.-vifficial from of Oklahoma's X701 precincts cave Turner. Oklahoma Citv oil fr.d cattleman. 11P.8H5, Gilmer and Jones G7.G80. Cop Fades O Coe. Oklahoma Citv sv.ornpy and only World War .11 vrrrran in '.he race, was fourth v. :tr. 50.531. republican ijace was a valkaway for Olnev F. Flynn, mayor of Tulsa, who won rrjsv mair'iiitv over liis two op- Flynn had 1 to .V Hartv M. Ingriiin and 2.- T? f Hi-xfi.rd (.'ragg. mill cliiC'-tlv to the gcni-ra! flfV.ion without a runoff. The wore from of 3.701 incumbent Oklahoma all democrats, were 'it i-d into iiiiidff in yc.-.ler- v.hih- four others r.iv.lv wfin nominations in the Hcnomir.ali-d wi-rc George 13. first district, and Hoss riphth district, republi- cs .-.5. and Mike Monronry, fifth nr.d W. H. Sligler, .sec- end ru-morrats. Tour Solons Face FijrliU Johnson, sixth, jicvcnlh, and '.i- fntirth. all democrats. .1 Iheir but mi-t sliff I'l-i'uf In the third district democra- TiK-p to succeed Rep. Paul Stewart-, democrat, who was nol candidate, the apparent runoff v.'ill he Bill Slcgf-r. Durant. Car] Albert, McAlester. both ;.v.f.rr.( although State Sen. Baylcss Irhy of Boswi'll was prt-s- S Albert for second place. Payne Still Runs Well Ar.ay Payne, clr-rk of the ?up.-crr.e court, and Stale Sen. C. Jonop. candidate for the cc-rpriration rnmmission, easily tlie two opponents rich drew and scored clear ma- Payne, who gained fame by v. :r.r.ing the bunion dcrbv, v. as sc-t-kinc his fourth term. He to for his opponent, Joe M. Lynch, :n precincts. Junes alro ran far ahead, net- RO.lIKi votes in prc- His iv-arcst opponent, A. Mauldin. got 2X021. The in- W. J. Armstrong, did r.-'.'t seek re-olc-ction. Williamson and Shaw had but opponent rach, and won easi- Williamson was of L. Conner. 74.8-U to !Jo.'', :n 3732 precincts. Price Picture Over Nation Remaining In Jigsaw Puzzle By Trir A.ssniilaltMl I'rt'SK The U. S. consumer had only scattered pieces of a jigsavv price puzzle today to indicate his fu- ture financial picture but he glimpsed higher costs in a few of! them. While it was too early to deter- mine over-all trends in the costs (if everyday necessities, the con- sumer look note of record high prices yesterday for cattle, above- ceiling paymrnt.s for hogs and varying increases some places in what he pays for butter, poultry, milk, choose, flour and a few other items, particularly.rent. OffseUing those advances, how- ever, were steady price levels in many other commodities, plus pledges from business and indus- try to keep them that way wher- ever possible.' The senate, divided as to the necessity for M restitution of price controls, was studying a possible compromise measure. Most Complaints On Rents From nro'tnd the nation came a crescendo of complaints from tenants who told of extra-high rents imposed by landlords, but '.here were indications that most renters had received no notice of increases. Several states and cities acted to put ceilings on rentals, while others studied the matter. In brief, yesterday's price de- velopments were these: t'al.Ueinen ru.shed their animals lo market ID take advantage of balooning prices, up to a record high at Chicago, which was 50 cents above Monday and over the expired OPA's top price. Hogs glutted the market but hauled thi- price down only and Jl.fid below Monday's Inp, the best prior since Wilson Stays' At Coillnp 1'rlcen One of the n.ition's major pack- ers, Wilson and company, announ- ced it was offering meat on hand at former ceiling prices. In New York and Chicago, poul- try prices jumped and 10 cents a pound. In Wall Street, the slock mar- ket steadied and sales dropped to a four-monlh low. Wool went up but cotton fu- tures fell off TexUJes remained at ceiling levels. Flour brought to per hundredweight for July ship- the OPA price but under the former black market price by about dealers said. Grain prices boomed somewhat but clothing remained on store racks at the figures as be- fore OPA's end, There was no'buying rush by the consumer. Wins First Race New Judge Surprise Vote Getter GRAY Price Control Plan Regaining Support Coalition Which Caused Presidential Veto of OPA Bill Breaking Up But Some Restrictions in Authority Likely By JACK BELL WASHINGTON, July control prospects picked up in the senate today as signs appeared that; the Filipinos Ready For Celebration Of Independence Red Ambassador In Peaceful Talk 15 v OR.Ml AM IIOVKY WASHINGTON. July Nikolai V. NoviUov, nuw Russian tr> this country, prom- :svri today the Soviet Union "wiil never ;art a war against l'n.'t'-d St .tcs or anyone else." Ar.d by the s.'une token, lie .said :.c knew that the people of this do no: want tu figiit any- f'.-ir. B-.it wii.le lie insisted that all briwcen the two ma- powers can be "ironed Novikov c.'iut'om-d that solutions ior :r.any world problems will time and patience. SINGINO TliritSDAY AT HIGH An all-day singing convention M Ji.gh Hill church has an in- tn all who Would like to July .1 tl-.eic. Ail Indians I'spcciallv in-! f. iittcnn. The affair starts] r.: i: a m. wr.'i lunch to be served Witness Afraid To Talk on Kilian BAD NAUHEIM, Germany July 3, i.-Ti A proseculion wil- ncss refused loday to teslifv nuainst Col. James Kilian Highland Park, 111., saying "I fear the things that may happen lo me." Killian, former commander of the U. S. army's replace- ment depot at England, is accused of authorizing cruel Irealmenl of American soldiers imnrisoned there. The witness who refused to testify was Simon Blocker. 25- vear-old negro of Chicago, 111., a former Lichfielcl prisoner who if serving a 10-year court martial for being absent with- out leaving during'combat. "I'm not testifying any Blut-ker told the military court. "I feel I hare jeopardized myself eno.igh. You see when this trial's ever I've got to go lo a detention (raining renter. I fear the things lhal may happen to mo when I reach the D. T. C. over here." "lias anybody made any threats to the prosecutor asked. "No." Blocker replied. "Bui you sec, due lo the fact these men who have been tried were not given any time (jail they're still in the army of oc- cupation. may be wrong but I some way feel they may be plac- ed in charge" of the D. T. C. over here and if they find me there I know what is going to happen lo me.'1 Moose are found principally) in Minnesota and. Maine, but some are found in Idaho, Montana, and Washington. [WEATHER! Oklahoma: Partly cloudy to- and Thursday with ;.c'attcr- eri in northwesl Thursday afl.vnoon or evening; change ;n temperature. The -19th parallel fol-ins much of the boundary between -the United States and the Dominion of Canada. No Paper July 4 On account of the paper shortage, necessitating the sav- ing of nil paper possible, The Ada News will nol issue a pa- per Thursday, July 4. The force will join the other peo- ple in the community in rest- ing or fishing or picknicking. coalition which molded the 'presidentially vetoed OPA bill might be cracking apart. With republicans threatening to support nothing more than n facsimile of the measure, waywnrd democrats were reported filtering back into the administration's fold. --------------------------------------------4- Senator Mill-dock (D-Utah) said lhal. us u moiT.ber of Ihe banking committee which begins work lo- day on a possible compromise measure, he has received concrete indications that some democrats who joined in whittling down OPA's powers have- had a change of heart. "I think the president, has so- lidified his party behind his posi- lion on the price control question 'as it never was solidified Murdock told a reporter. He added Unit the 283 lo 61 house vote Monday for 20-day atop gap controls, with Rep. Roe of Maryland as the sole democrat opposing, indicated a trend that may provide yood' news for OPA in the senate. GOP Wants Restrictions Republicans declared, however, they will not agree to restore price controls without sharp res- trictions in OPA authority. Chairman Taft (Ohio) of the minority steeling commitlee said he personally is willing to com- promise some of the provisions of an extension measure. But he added that many of his colleagues want to re-enact without material change the bill Mr. Truman ve- toed. There is some republican senli- too, to let OPA lie dormant until the full effects of the ugsn- cy's death can be assessed. Let's Senator Moore (Okla) put this sentiment into words in a radio address last night in which he said he had hoard of nothing in the first two days without price control to indicate a "national col- uncontrolled inflation. July Fourth Is Holiday And Ada People Switching From Election Fever To Plans for Spending Day Thursday brings Fourth of July and again Ada the busy MANILA, July 3, undampenccl in intermittent ruins, eager Filipinos put the finishing touches today on the historic site stone's throw from Manila 'he war-torn Philip- pines will be declared officially independent tomorrow. They completed the grandstand which Gen. Douglas MacArlhur and olher high ranking officials arc scheduled to participate in an eventful ceremony. The program committee announced, however, that if the weather is unfavorable the ceremoni-js may be transfer- red to Rizal stadium in South Manila. U. S. Senator Millarcl Tydings, of Maryland, co-author of the Tydings-McDuffie Act graaling independence will make a 10-min- ule address at a.m. tomorrow p.m. central standard time MacArthur, who has been ac- corded a tumultous reception as the man who was forced out of the Philippines in the early days of the war but returned in tri- umph, will 'speak for 30 minutes :it a.m. He arrived by plane from "Tokyo yesterday. The main address, at: a.m., will be delivered by U. S. High Commissioner Paul V. McNutt, representing President Truman. He substitutes for interior Secre- tary Julius Krug, originally scheduled to represent the presi- dent. Police Make Five Arrests Tuesday However, Police Consider That Rather Small for A Holiday Police officials reported that Tuesday five arrests were made. This is considered rather small for a holiday. Two men were picked tip for drunkenness and .fighting and were fined each, one person was fined for pos- session and two drunks paid fines Chevrolet sedan they of- each. The Calling upon the nation to until it can loam whether prices will be "as b.'i'd, or at least any worse, than the black markets under which we have suffered so long." Moore added: "Congress" i.-: always available tor emergenc-' legislation.'" In u later broadcast. Stabiliza- tion Director Chester Bowles who has resigned, effective July 10, cautioned thar living costs would double within 20 days if the pres- ent upward trend of commodity prices continued. Bowles acknowledged that he did not look .for such a thing to happen in U.iat period, but he asserted that the first day's price and rent increases "are only a taste of what ahead if we ac- i today changinp from election fe- ver into preparations for cele- bration of: Independence Day. The closing down of activities will be almost complete here. That means banks, postal ser- vices, bu.Hines-; houses, public of- fices. It means lhal hundreds will seek out fishing streams and lak- es, others will go picknicking and many .more will spend the day a- visiting. It means that most of the re- maining fireworks wfll go up in a blaze of rockets and candles and i'erinl bombs or off in noisy blasts of torpedoes and firecrackers. There is lo be the usual amount of visiting, too. Tile weather may cause some alloniliuns in planning Tor Ihe day because the forecaster has some comments about scattered thun- dershowers over most of the state Thursday. Heirens Is Held On Two Dozen Charges Include Four for Assault And 21 for Burglary CHICAGO, July iam G. Heirens, 17-year-old stud- tnt questioned about the kidnap- ping and slaying last winter o.f Suzanne Degnan, was ordered held for the grand jury today on tour charges of assault and 21 of burglary. Judge Matthew D. Haiiigan of teiony court set the youth's bond at on each of the 21 burglary charges, and on each of the four assault char- ges. The University of Chicago stud- ent.was arrested Wednesday night on one of UT-- burglary charges. The bureau of investiga- tion reported tjiat one of his palm and .finger prints were "identical" with Johnson Wins County Votes Boren in Second Place Here; Medlock and Nichols Face Hot Run-Off Cam- paign OKLAHOMA CITY, July I precincts of 50) in the I Fourth district for democratic 1 nomination for congress give: I I Abraham 1969; Boren i Dunn 1297: Hendon 8821; John- son Livingston 8971. Pontotoc county failed to stay by Congressman Lylc Boren this time, giving Glen Johnson of OkcniMh top spot, in the Tuesday voting and also assigning Luns- ford P. Livingston. Seminole, and Claude Hendon, Shnwncc sizeable totals. Boren got an unofficial total votes in the county. John- ion amassing Livingston 694 and Hendon Herbert Abraham, Biistow. picked up some stray votes as did Dunn, Holclenville negro. Virgil Medlock, stale represen- tative challenging Al G. Nichols, Wewoka, for the slate senate, is in a run-off with Nichols. Medlock carried his home Pon- totoc county with votes to for Nichols, but Otto Slriclc- Jand, former representative, of Allen, crowded into the picture in this county with votes. In Seminolt county, unofficial tabulations gave Nichols Medlock and Strickland 734. The unofficial totals arc Nich- ols. Medlock, and Strickland vies; Strickland's total is far more than enough to offset Nichols' margin over Mod- lock and sends the race into a heated finals campaign for the nomination on July 23. Seminole county cast Jess than 700 more votes in this race l.hnn did Pontotoc county. Thomas P. Holt returns to the state house of representatives af- ter repelling the challenge of Clyde Click, but H, P. Sugg, who led tha race for Rep, No. 2., must run it off with A T. Watson. Their unofficial votes were Watson But to be divided are Tom Goodman's 778, W. C. Gray's 838 and Elmer Dean's 1.- 198 votes, or more than ballots. U_________________ McArlhur Sweeping Republican Race For Stale Post Dew and Crawford Go Down, Kaiser In Run-Off With Smith Ada's candidate for attorney general on the republican tickel, C. L. McArthur, was 'going to town' as the votes came in from over the state. With only SB1" precincts, of the state's reported, McArthur was leading his one opponent for the republican nomination to Null thus has little chance of overtaking the Ada attorney. Pontoloc county had few re- publican voter; cast Tuesday and McArthur got 9 to Null's J for the county. Crable In "Run-Off But Far Behind OKLAHOMA CITY. July Superintendent A. L. Crable, long under fire as a res- ult of textbook controversies of bad second in Council Run-Off Roberts Wins Word 4 Race, Walker and Coleman In 'At-Lorge' Finals Ada got a bit of extra voting Tuesday, deciding one' race for city council and leaving another unselllcd. H. J. Huddleslon for Ward 1. Dr. C. lr. Spencer for Ward 2 and Joe Hensley for Ward 3 were un- opnosed. Vcrnon Roberts defeated Pink Norwood for Ward representa- tive on the council, to -HO in unofficial count. M. W. "Red" Walker, who was a member of the board of free- 'holders which drafted the. revis- ed city charter soon to go into ef- fect, was a late entry in the 'at- Inrgo' citr-wv but forced well ahead of his four opponents. Ollie Coleman finished in sec- ond place and a spot in-a run-off which is scheduled therefore'for Julv Unofficial returns gave Walker 110-J, Coleman Ltilhcr Hud- gens SCifi, W. A. Ryan 3M and Walker Hisle 25-1. The now chancing Ada from the commission to the conn-] cil-manafUT plan of government, will go into effect. July 22 and the council now being selected, for the first time, faces a busy lime helping get. the new si-tup in effect through n manager ln.be employed and through him aid- ing in sUDcrvisory capacities for Ihe big change. Complon Figures Underwater Bomb jolt Is Stronger Famous Scicnttist Forecasts More Damage to Ships In Next Atom Bomb Test prints found on a note de- years past, ran a mandnig ransom from the I the feature secondary race of npunsin fnmilv. yesterday's, primary election, but family. Counsel for Heirens waived preliminary examination at the arraignment; on Ihe assault and burglary charges. After the youth's attorneys had lost a court release on a pus yesterday. Heirens was form- ally charged with assault with in- lent lo murder, three charges of assault with intent to kill and 21 burglaries. None of the charges involve the Degnan crime, said Slate's Attorney William J. Tu- ohy." j'ight to obtain his' writ of habeas cor- yesterday's, primary cinched a place in the runoff. Topping Crable was Dr. Oliver Hodge. Tulsa county superinten- dent. Hodge, in ot the slate's precincts, received an un- official total ot votes to 296 for Crablti, but other scatler- ed votes made certain a second primary. race between the two school men. Five other candidates for sec- ondary offices won democratic nominations without a runoff. Foremost rimong them was Lieut. Gov. James E. Berry, seek- ing a fourth KICKED, BEATEN PRISONERS I T I July which the police reported found upturned in a ditch east of town was nol a stolen car. It was owned by W. R. Stanton of 705 South Eighth, McAlester. He had loaned it to a boy he picked up in Hoiclenville and the boy was drunk when he wrecked the car. One accident was reported to police Tuesday. Clifford Wal- lace of Fenlem Hall was riding a motorcycle and attempted to pass a 1033 Chevrolet driven by Frances Patterson, 311 South Constant, on the wrong side and in doing so hit the right, front _.._ ___________ __________ fender of the sedan. Wallace that Ghecns was not Ihem agreed to pay the damages and no charges were filed. charges and no effort would made to furnish-bond. Heirens, following his brief ap- 3, court martial to- j pearar.ce yesterday was placed day acquitted. Ptc Austin D unde, of tm-ee poiicemen Ghecns pi Newport lenn of! in hJ3 at the detective bureau, charxes that he struck and kick-1 He was not subjected to further jy police, about the Detectives. Walter lame? Kilian oC Highland Park., 111., was on trial, a negro prosecu- tion witness was excused when lie refused to testify with the ex- plana'tion. that "I fear the 'things that may happen to me." Gheens denied he struck and! Read The Ada News Want Ads. kicked the prisoners. Three pre- viously convicted guards testified when the prisoners were struck. Several prosecution witnesses had sworn they saw Gheens hit the men. Chief Storms of said Jaycees to Hear About Convention Ronald Bijjck will be in charge of. the Junior Chamber oC Com- merce program Wednesday night that Heirens had j 8 o'clock, according lo officials been advised by his attorneys not to answer any questions. Since lasti Friday night Tuohjr and Storms and otiier top ranking law of the club. Trice Broadrick and Finis Mor- rison are scheduled lo make a report on their trip to the Na- rogated the youth about the Deg nan case but he has denied any connection witK-the crime. enforcement officials have inter- j tional Convention al Milwaukee. The swivel chair was invented four centuiies ago. James Ritty of Ohio, invented the first cash register in 1879. ABOAFD USS McKINLEY. AT BIKINI, July 3. The under- writer test of the atomic bomb will do more damage to the fuinea piu fleet; than the air burst did. Dr. Karl Complon predicted today. Complon. president of Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology and member of both the presi- dential and joint: chief of slaff evaluation commissions, was not surprised that more shios were not sunk in the July 1 lest. His guess in advance hod been that no ships would be sent to the bottom by the overhead bomb. A'-tually, five were. The second 'est, exnected in three or four weeks, will produce auite a high spout and some size- able waves, he said. The evaluation board and cor- respondents cquld safely have been closer to the bomb explos- sion. Compton said. Ho estimat- ed 12 miles would have been a i safe distance. (The observers i were from 15 to 18 miles away.) i For the underwater test to come Compton believes observers can be closer because the water will have some shielding effect. He made a guess that force of the underwater explosion will be cx- cencled mosllv upward rather than spherically. Nevertheless, he said the spherical blow that hits ships' bottoms will, be pow- erful. Compton and Bradley Dewey, president of the American Chemi- cal Society and a fellow member of Ihe president's (.'valuation board, revealed they accepted with reservations an opinion ex- pressed by weather authorities on failure of the atomic mush- room cloud lo soar lo a greater heieht. They said thai just above 000 feet the atomic cloud bump- j ed its head into an. obstacle thai I nooarently slowed its up-rush. This obstacle was a hazy cloud, wide and fairly flat. Weather men said it was. a mass of ice crystals. Compton said he doubted it was ice but could nol be sure. Ice, lie ex- plained, does form in crysals to make some clouds at that height, and if it was ice the color photos, when developed, will prove it. The cloud apparently was caused by nir expanding rapidly, Compton said. Explosions in the mushroom as it rose may have created this water vapor or ice vapor. Tuberculosis occurs more fre- quently among men than women. Greater returns 1'br amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. i Schnectady, tered in 1798. N. Y., was char- David Gray Makes Surprise Showing For Commissioner Collins Facet Run-Off, Thompson Has Clote Against Field of Five Pontoloc county voters Tuos- day spoke louder than nil the campaign thunder that had been rolling across their hills and prairies, placing thoir favor as they pleased and in so doing bringing about more changes than 'usual in the county official family. For one thing, they streamed to the colls in larger than the most optimistic fore- casts, favorable weather and high interest combining to pet almost voters to the booths. They put an end to the ten- ure of Tal Crawford, for many years district judge, with Hoyt COE LEADS IN COUNTY, TURNER IS RUNNER-UP The surprising last minute surge of William Coc in the race for democratic nomination for governor caught the fancy of enough Ponlntoc rounli.inx In put sonie of them to aetivu campaigning find, in the end, to present Coe with top place in county voting. Koy Tumor, lone well liked here, piled up n steady vole in all parts of Ada mid Hit? county but. was nosed out of first plucc, trailing Coc by little than 200 votes. H. C. Jones' support was spot- ted but he came in with third ranking, heading Dixie Gilmer by 300 votes In Hie r-ice for lieutenant governor it was all Jim Berry, who spread-eagled n field of Seven rivals. I'ontotoc ciHinty stood by A. I.. C'nililc. slate superintrnilenl, :IK in (lie pii.sl, giving; him an imolTicial nun-Kin "t to for Oliver Hodge, hU nearest competitor. Driskill, former county judge and War II veteran, running up an impressive unofficial margin of to votes. Dew Swept Aside They swept Sam Dew, three- time county treasurer, from of- fice by giving Virgil Hunt ballots to Dew's 2.606. left Earl Parker. District 1 county commissioner, far baclc Official Vote Later The News hopes to print on Friday official totals on all races voted on Tuesday. The county election board is work- ing on an unusually long ballot tabulation. The precinct boards did a grand job Tuesday, get- ting all boxes in before the county board then got the pro- and tiiis despite an almost rec- ord number of candidates. The cunty board then Rot the pre- cinct reports to News employes in a steady stream the reports flowed to the office and out over loudspeaker to a large throng of listeners outside and over the local radio station. The News appreciates the efficient work of the precinct and county election boards that made pos- sible speedy reports of a long, complicated day's balloting. of David Gray, making his first race, and early totals indicated that Gray may have defeated both opponents: official totals will decide this point. George Collins, long District 2 commissioner, faces a run-off with Bob A u Kiel I. making his second try for the place. Col- lins wns more than 700 votes (Continued on Page '1, Column 7) TH' PESSIMIST IIV Itnli Jr. Trade value of a wolf skin in Montana 65 years ago was two cups of sugar, and a beaver skin was worth only half a cup. Matches can be waterproofed by dippjng the heads in a creamy solution made by dissolving shel- lac in denatured alcohoL YOJJ never know how long your neck is 'til you stick it out on' 'n election bet. It's all right f talk about doin' somethin' in th' long run. most o' us ain't got wind enough t' hold out.   

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