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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 2, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 2, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             If you d. ..t vot. Tues'd.y then you d. not h.v, the ,i9hf t. criticize, condemn, .r 'gripe' when county, or federol elected officio.s do not meo.....p whot you would like. Sri Clrciil.illiin 8271 .Memb.T: Audi' riurrau ol ClrciilaUun THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 4..rd 67 ________ OKLAHOMA. TUESDAY, JULY 2, 1946 __________________ FIVE CENTS THE copy MANY COUNTY VOTERS MARCH TO POLLS Chance of Rcmakina OPA Grows Brighter But Outlook for Stop-Gap Controls Fades Despite Hurried House Action SENATE UNHURRIED Recreated OPA Likely To Be Along Lines Prei.Tru- mon Might Accept WASHINGTON, July Adamant opponents blocked ef- I'oi-ls to speed an OPA revival to- nay as senate leaders sought in- formal agreement on a compro- mise price control bill. All price controls were off. The senate opposition made it increas- ingly apparent that any restora- tion bill will be several weeks. Bolstered by apparent majority support within the senate bank- ing committee. Democratic Lead- er Barkley (Ky) tried lo get op- posing sides together on a year's extension of the OPA as ,a sub- stitute for the 20-day revival res- olution passed 283-61 by the house yesterday. But when Senator Maybank (D- presiding, sought to assign a temporary extension bill offer- ed by Senator Wagner (D-NY) to the banking committee, Senators O'Daniel (D-Tcx) and Wherry (It-Neb) objected. This had the effect of de-laving for on-i day-the sending of the bill to the com- mittee. Olijcctions Block In Senate i A few minutes later, when the pate any general price increases house extender officially arrived they are made necessary in the senate, Barkley asked un- L... .i.onuKicturers. animous consent to send it imme- ;lnlidPat- clintely to the banking committee. :n? a tjig buying spree when some Wherry objected trie- ileim- that have been lie and O'Daniel then raised an- a number of months other parliamentary technicality Prices Here Vary Little In General, Merchants Waiting for What They Hove to Pay for New Stock The hfling of price control ap- parently IKK] h'.tle effect on Acln rrir: but a few increases m :cnt have been reported tf) vari- ous officials about town, it is to di-te: mine the extent of t.-ic sudden incicase in rent pri- ce? as never been rent in All controls were lifted Monday morning and there was plenty of con......nt about increas- es in tin- pri -es of various items '.ha: every people have- to chase wec-k in and week out. A dealer in ladies ready to v reported that there wi'll he no increase in the price of the that he has on hand at the present time. He added that he could not predict farther than his present stock because his price v.-'.'.l be rietenv.ined by the amount that he has to pay for items. As far as can he determined there has been no inc.'ease in the p of food stuff, but, like the ready to wear merchant, grocer is looking fur the first on items to bo received this v.t-ck. Ada merchants do not anlici- i Voter Move Sparked by Races For Governor, County Offices Here is a closeup view of.the heavy cruiser U. S. S. Pcnsacola showing the damage to her super- Cr structure, following aboard the U. S. S Praph was t a ken from (NBA Telephoto from Joint Army-Navy Task Force One Radio i.it the counters, hut that the ru.'.h -won't last long. New Principal For Napier School C. R. Buford Replaces S. S. Bradley, Veteran Teacher Critically III S P. Bradl. y. who for a num- b- years was principal of Na- p.'.-r sch'iol. resigned his position May and was replaced Monday C. R. B-.iford of Arcadia. Bu- rd v.-as elected to the Ada post Monday evening at the regular :r.or.-.nly meeting of the Ada of Education. The new principal holds a BA from jumpslon university and an MA degree from Colorado which delayed its assignment to the committee until tomorrotv. The house measure probably will be used by the committee as the basis for any compromise ex- tension legislation it may draft Without waiting for the bill assignment. Barkley carried on informal discussions with OPA opponents in search of middle ground for a compromise the com- mittee might consider when it laKps up the subject, possibly to- morrow. Bowles Hopeful At the White House, Chester Howies told reporters he was hopeful Ihe senate will pass the continuing OPA resolution this week and then more permanent legislation "within two or three weeks." Asked why he thought action might come this week, the retiring economic stabilizer said- "I m always optimistic." Cattle, Hog Prices Aaord 3 AI Drop Sharply Today Stockyards Swamped With Rush of Stock, Chicago Has Record Receipts; General Price Picture Over Nation Is Confused By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Prices of cattle and hogs dropped sharply today as the nation's stockyards were swamped with a flood of shipments in contrast to the near-record' highs paid yesterday in the first free market in four years. Chicago reported the greatest cattle receipts in six months, but hogs were moving slowly at about compared to yesterday's highest since 1919. The hog top one week ago was A survey of the 12 ranking markets in the country showed hogs in the pens compar- ed to a week ago and 54 500 On the 'basis of what happened 20 per cent, and when the i! and lasl year at Arcadia :n Oklahoma county. Principal Buford 'gave the com- memcnt address here this year and ji.-cordin1.1 to Superintendent O. Mori-son is a good man the- jub. B.-adle-y was in poor health jr.C'5'. of the last school semester cirri has been under a doctor's seveni. months. His con- ;s reported unimproved at hospital. Jfillliavelo Use Stamp for Sugar Second Home Canning Sugar li Now Vaiid A sec-rind" hornc canning sugar good for five pounds of M-Ka.-. became valid July 1 and a will Mill lie rc.-quired for I.-K- j'-.iri-hase of sugar in spite of tr.r fact that controls arc no 3 ncd OPA. in w staii.p'v. ill In- Spare No. Ml in Ihe family ration Tno new '-.tamp, as'well as No. p. will he good J.orr.e canning use through Gc-.-'ber 3J. ,-eq-jests have been re- e-d by what was the local i Control concerning additional canning sugar. dealers add push it up to (On the a mark-up it will 75 per second day of trading, swamped livestock markets were with livestock and hogs sent in" by raisers attraciod by yesterday's near-record high prices. As a rc-sull today's prices dropped Miarply. Chicago reported the greatest cattle receipts in six mon- ths. (The stock market leveled off and commodity futures in New iork sagged after yesterday's up- swing. These fluctuations 'in pri- mary markets have not generally affected retail prices, which for i OPA levels until'the picllu-e at" Washington clarifies. (lients continued to zoom in many ai threats DDT Spray Trucks Not Working Today Operators Go Home To Vote, May Finish Citywide Job on Wednesday Mayor Luke B. Dodds1 reported Tuesdav morning that the DDT spray trucks were not working in Ada. The truck drivers are state employees and the state had given them a day's holiday so they could return to their homes continued strong, and cast their votes in the all! These fluctuations still had not Makes Setting 01 Peace Meet Nearer PARIS, July fore- ign ministers council agreed in principle today on the interna- tionalization of Trieste, but has not yet agreed on a statute for the Adriatic port, Sen. Arthur Vandcnburg said, The Michigan senator said the council had also agreed ,on the area to in the even- tual international zone, foreshad- owing eventual acceptance of the French compromise proposal on the Italian-Yugoslav frontier. The'council did not discuss the question of fixing a date for the general European conference, the senator said on returning to the American delegation headquar- ters after a 1'our-hour meeting. Governor Race Is Only One ol Stale Wide Interest Bur It Is Sufficently Heated To Spur Movement to Polls Today OKLAHOMA CITY, July 2, >.V> 400.000 Oklahomans are expected to cast ballots today in the first step toward electing a governor and eight congressmen although most of the nominees will not be determined until the July 28 runoff primary. Also to be selected are other state officials to serve the next, four years. Eight democrats and three re- publicans nre on today's first pri- mary ballots seeking toria nominations to succeed Gov. Robert S. Kerr, democrat, who under the state constitution may not succeed himself. Regarded as leading the demo- cratic race to succeed Kerr are Roy J. Turner, Oklahoma City oil man, rancher and president of the American Hereford associa- tion; H. C. Jones, Oklahoma City, former collector of internal reve- nue for Oklahoma: Dixie Gilmer, Tulsa county prosecutor, and Wil- liam O. Coe, Oklahoma City, at- torney and only World War II veteran in the race. Olney F. Flynn, former mayor News Will Sheriff, County Tell Vote f Charges Torture Of Jews at Camp LONDON, July a member of the world executive of the Jewish agency, of Tulsa and son of a 'territorial i told a press conference today lie The Ada News inviles citizens Ponloloc, county to the 100 block on North Broadway tonight to get returns of today's election as they come in from precincts over this county and by Associa- ted Press wire service from all over the state. The county re- turns will be given by precincts and by accumulating totals. A P. A. system will make the announcement of returns clear lo all. Because of the he.v.'y vote and .the many names on the ballot, re- turns are expected lo begin com- ing in a bit later than usual, prob- ably after 8 o'clock, but citizens arc invited to come earlier and get the first scattering results thai will be reported from over Oklahoma. Station K A D A, cooperating with The News, will broadcast News tabulations of Pontoloc county voting from time to time tonight, giving returns by pre- cincts and by mounting totals. By JOSEPH DYNAN PARIS, July an a year indication since j on the knotty problem of the end oi' OPA that the gears oi' Tj''este apparently within their supply and demand were begin- ning to creak again. Stock Market Cools Off The stock market had cooled off with price changes narrow and slightly mixed. Wool and cotton tops were down but some grains important primary election. The trucks and their drivers will be back on the job tomorrow arid will probably finish the spraying job. Monday the trucks were only able to spray the Sales Barn and a lew other places un- der roof because of the early af- ternoon showers. Wednesday the trucks will spray the city jail, the business district and the residen- tial sections which they have not yet made. I generally affected the nation's re- tail prices, held in check for the most part by merchants who pledged to "hold-the-line" until the situation is clarified. There was no change in the. pattern of rising rent prices ex- cept in scattered instances where despite congressional a retroactive ceiling Slow Presidrnlial Secretary Charles ,i newsmen telegrams to the White House on Mr. Tru- grasp, the Four foreign min- isters seemed on the verge today of setting the date for a 21-nation general European peace confer- ence. The council yesterday, in what Okiahoma delegate to congress, is generally conceded to be the leading opponent in the republi- can contest for the gubernatorial nomination. Oklahoma's t w o republican congressmen and five of the six democratic incumbents are seek- ing re-election. Rep. Paul Ste- wart, democrat, retired from the third district race because of ill health. A full state ticket, with the had received reports alleging acts of torture on Jewish men and women detained nt the Athlil camp near 1-Taif.-, Palestine. He said former inmates of the Buchenwald orison in Germany were beaten at another Palestine camp. Commenting on the military j Commissioner Races Boost Total Campaign Thunder Sub- sides as Balloten Over to Make Decisions Pontoloc- county voters trooped to the polls today in sizeable numbers, each one king for a day after hearing the picas of candidates in growing volume from late spring into early sum- mer. The march of the voters was spurred both by the customary impetus of a race for governor and by several hotly contested county compctilions. The movement to the polls got under wa- early and in numbers that belied early-campaign re- ports of apathy. Rural precincts are voting from 7. a.m. until 6 p.m. and town and city precincts from G a.m. until 7 p.m. Thunder Muted The thunderous crescendo of the campaign, reachinc 1ls ulti- mate on Monday and Mond.iv night, was muted today as vote solicitation centered on personal contacts. It will begin to build up by the end of this week as candidates surviving the first primary but fa-'ed with a run-off race gather their forces for the three weeks drive leading up to July 23 J ontotoc county mailed out 135 absentee ballots, says Joe Beck secretary of the county election bo.ird, ami also sent out five war billots that had been requested. rne.se numbers indicate more police operations in outcome by those who cannot be Palestine, at home to do their ballot-s Locker declared: ing. "The world must know that the Bijr Vote-Countinj Job situation is graver than has been I exception of the U. S. senate, is j painted by the British press or Precinct officials are ,_._, longer, more tedious for being voted upon today, but the I in the; house of commons and it only slate-wide race which has! is getting graver from hour lo anv inlpriacf ic 11-mt hour Locker declared that the male populatin of the collective settle- ment of Yagui, including boys over JO of age, had been drawn any governor. Trainmen Hurt In Trail Derailing OKLAHOMA CITY. July trainmen were injured western power sources described as a "very great adopt-1 critically today when a south- ed Fi-ench Foreign Minister Geor- bound Santa Fe passenger train ran off a detour track laid around a bridge under repair and crash- state and civil authorities attemp- I wers today ges Bidault's compromise proposal for Yugoslavia's western frontier, but both Secretary of State James F. Byrr.es and British For- eign Secretary Ernest Bevin said they wanted more time to con- sider a companion project for in- ternationalizing Trieste. They said they would give their ans- lacing a usual, too. -------J than The long state ballot with many HI most of the races makes vote counting a big task. Then there are the county races, a were were up, vineyards ighed partly destroyed and the water installations made unworkable. their own emer- Byrnes conferred for more than I Kansas ed down a 20-foot embankment. It was not believed any of the estimated 150 passengers aboard the train were hurt. Railroad officials said the in- jured were Fred W. Morgan, en- gineer and Ike Hall, fireman. Both are from Arkansas City, goncy ceilings. The sudden activity in livestock markets was not reflected in areas stricken with shortages by in- creased supplies of fresh beef and --_..._ j UCCS, a s question and arrested and detained at Athlil. j'"   in i; nil L- ine second baggage car perch- i utilization of Filipinos and East od precariously on the embankment. the side of Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Indians already in this country! I provided they can nice' ship requirements. Read the News Classified Ads. Firefighters Bottle Flames In Bikini Atom Bombed Ships country, Other election interest ranges from justice of the peace to sta" __ and representative. WASH INC TON7 J'arm prosperity, which rolled to an historic peak durine the war By DON WHITEHEAD speculators are already "placing bets on inflation." But he insisted ti.at price controls would win out. t. Despite '.lie soaring prices at primary markets, retailers for the most part held to OPA ceilings. Meat was ;i notable exception -J when it could be found. Oklahoma: Partly cloudy and i xv.v-n-.e-.- tonight and Wednesday v.-.-.-; occii.-jfina, thunder showers west Rents In Sharpest Jump 4. The sharpest jump of all was in rents, with advances running ,_ ll-ll. IVJclllllct IrlML (Cuntmued on Pnfie 2 Column Z) Japanese surrender. MacArihur Special Philippines Guest MANILA, July Douglas MacArthu'r, honor guest at the July 4 independence cere- monies of the islands he libera- ted, arrived from Japan today in his glistening C-54 transport plane "Bataan." He was given a tumullous wel- come at Nichols field. The first to greet him were Philippines President Manual Roxas and the American high commissioner, Paul V. McNutt. Mrs. MacArthur was with the supreme Allied commander on his first trip from Japan since he left Manila last August upon the nation, along with clothing manu-1 ABOARD U. S. S. APPALA- facturers, announced their inten-1 CHIAN, July 2, tion of 'keeping prices at OPA; crews worked on into the secom levels. Three States Freeze Rents Governors of New Jersey, Ala- bama and Massachusetts froze rent charges by executive order. Rentals, in New York and the District of Columbia already were controlled by Robert D. Blue of I day ia atom-blasted Bikini -la- goon today. dousing lingering pockets of flame through the tar- get of whose 73 ves- sels already had. been sunk. That the second test, tentative- ly scheduled within three or four ____ weeks, may take a far greater Iowa asked loll was indicated in an inter- Go v. citizens to observe all provisions iview with Navy Secretary For- previously. n The'Los Angeles city council in special session passed an emer- gency ordinance making it a cri- minal misdemeanor for any land- lord to increase rents above those in effect June 30. In Washington, Boyd Barnard, president of the national associa- tion of real estate boards, said :ifter a cross-country checkup he believed there would be no im- I mediate "across-the-board" rent j increases and not more than 10 per cent: boosts during the next 12 months. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. restal radioed from the flagship ;il I Mt. McKinley. He expressed sur- prise at the "relatively unimpor- tant" damage inflicted upon the heavier ships by Monday's air drop, but noted that such ships are "difficult to sink unless they sustain underwater damage." Hulls To Feel Blow The second atomic blast" is to bo set off under water, with the sea transmitting a terrific blow to the hulls of the test fleet. The lagoon at mid-afternoon today still was "reacting" from blast and lethal radiation of yes- terday morning's aerial biju-st. force commander, reported from1 Kawjalein. He termed the op- eration "a complete and unquali- fied success." Forrestal warned against pre- mature conclusions, but voiced one generality as the result of his own observations: "there still will be navies in the future." Whether crewmen could have lived through the blast remained an unanswered question, but scientists expect to learn much by observing the effects of the rays upon surviving test animals, teth- ered at battle stations aboard the target fleet. Jap Cruiser Down First Fifth test ship lo sink was the broken Japanese cruiser Sakawa modern warship, welded stead of riveted and consequently mi.ich F submarine Skate, and a lank land- ing ship. Some 25 others were damaged in varying degree, and unscathed. Radio reports said that all of the army's B-17 drones had re- turned to Eniwctok "radiological- Jy hot." with the lethal rays from two of them particularly intense. Handlers were unable to ap- proach them. A quick tour of the Bikini la- goon today showed that the in- to a gutted shell but still borne the brunt of the blast, along with the bullscye ship Nevada, the Pensacoln and the Sakawa. The bomb evidently burst between the Nevada and Pensacola. The submarine skate, a mile from the pea it during the war years, -.should continue at least until well into the com- merc" department said today But after that, it c-.-iulioned, here is no assurance that tho old farm of ade- quate markets and hidden farm not again, appear." TH' PESSIMIST Nevada, had stronger structurally. First listed as "missing" stroyer Anderson later was an- nounced definitely sunk, as were the attack transports Gilliam and Carlisle and the destroyer Lam- son. Badly damaged yawning gashes in lower and super- her conning j structure. Ihe de- The Skate was being beached. Associated Press Correspondenl cnn iu'r .Independence, were the battleship Jnpnncso ball ioship Brig. Gen. Roger M. Kainny, lir iNaffnlo. heavy cruiser Pcnsucola, Elton C. Fay reported from Vice Adm. W. H. P. Blandy's flagship, the Ml. McKinley. Beaching was being attempted whcrcvur lo permit easi- er cl.-imago assessment of the hulls. With Hi1 OPA out, it's cheaper now f have t.h' doc- tor than t' eat 'n apple'a day. Anyway, we're all blessed in one respect no matter how ugly we 'rp we allus enjoy lookin' ut ourselves in th' mirror.   

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