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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: July 1, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - July 1, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             That atom bomb's results weren't anything to what will happen in Oklahoma politics will be casualties, many hopes sunk, others scorched and blasted, and a big upheaval Avcraie Net May Paid Circulation 8271 MemlKT; Audit Burrau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd GO ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Candidates Today Sound Final Blasts in Their Vote Pleas, Voters Take Over on Tuesday Expect State Voters To Ballot Tuesday Much of Campaign This Year Has Been Plea For Attention at Much As For Votes By CI'.NE POTES OKLAHOMA CITY, July primary election campaign will come to a noisy halt tonight as candidates for of slate and county of- fices sound t.'icir final blasts in   ]94''. Roosevelt die of the block in front of Ba5'- less Drug. The accident occured cm Saturday and the boy was not seriously injured. He and his brother were running across the street together and his brother had just got out of the way when Roger was hit. Greater returns for amount in- Ada News Want Ads. j repair service? in an executive order which di- rected it to see that no federal agency or 'company doing busi- ness with the government dis- criminated against any person for reasons of race, creed, color or natural origin. Magellan discovered Philip- pines in did you dis- cover Sinnett-Meaders wonderful 6-30-lt Polio Is Not Epidemic In Ada Just Now Two Cases Reported, One Death; Health Head Gives Recommendations Dr. R. H. Mayes, head of the city-county health unit, said ear- ly Monday morning that only two cases of poliomelities (polio) had been reported to him and that death resulted from one of the two cases .reported. The doctor was quick to say that two cases does not constitute an epidemic. The total number of cases re- ported for the entire nation from Jan, 1 to June 1, 1046, is as compared to 811 cases for the same period last year. "Figures show that polio in- cidence is on a definite upswing. Most, of the cases to date have occurred in Florida, Texas' and the doctor reported. He continued by saying, "Texas and California have had a higli incidence of the disease for the past three years and it is likely that Oklahoma will continue to have scattered cases at least as long as the incidence remains high in those two states." Boy's Condition Critical The latest report from the Crippled Children's hospital in Oklahoma City is that the condi- tion of the second Ada polio vic- tim is critical. The doctor says that parents should be ony the alert for any sign of in child- ren, and consult a doctor. Vomit- ing, severe headache, sore stiffness in the heck, loss of ap- petite, fever or signs of a com- mon cold may be the first symp- toms of polio. All children and' adults who are sick with an un- explained fever should be put to bed and isolated pending med- ical diagnosis, Dr. Mayes ex- plains. Don't Keep Children Confined He said that another precaution is to keep children out of large crowds of people that the child- ren are not ordinarily around. Keeping children strictly at home is not desirable and there is pro- bably little to be gamed by iso- lating them from their usual but the point is to keep them out gf large groups of strange children for at least another week or until officials have additional time for investi- gation. Children are warned not to swim in water that may be pol- luted with sewage. Swimming in a well regulated pool is probably not dangerous unless there is a serious epidemic.. Flies Can Carry Virus Flies should be controlled and unsanitary conditions cleaned up. Records show that flies can carry the virus of polio. Dr. Mayes warns against fati- gue and sudden chilling of the body. These have been shown experimentally to increase the severity of an infection of polio and small children should have a rest period every day, the doctor asserted. "Avoid panic. Remember that usually only one out of six child- ren with infantile paralysis will develop any paralysis and that; it is usually a mild disease. We .believe that these mild cases will remain undiagnosed 'Unless par- ents are alert. So be alert, but avoid Dr. Mayes said. Wealthy New Yorker Escapes Kidnappers Bruised, Beaten Before He Gets Away from Thugr PHILADELPHIA, July and beaten, Michael Reiter, 47, wealthy New York dress manufacturer, who lives at Forest Hills, Long Island, told police here today he was kidnap.- ed in New York by two thug% who kept him a prisoner in his own car until he was able to es- cape at a filling station when they stopped to fill the steaming radiator with water. Reiter gave police the follow- ing account before returning .to New York this morning. The harrowing five-hour ride ended with a desperate fight for freedom when car stopped at a Philadelphia filling station. While one of his captors was filling' the radiator, Reiter grab- bed a 'revolver from the second and pulled the trigger three times but the weapon failed to fire. The thug smashed Reiter's face with his fists and Reiter jumped out of the car. The man who had been filling the radiator scooped up the re- volver, jumped into the car and sped away. So quick was the whole inci- dent, William Bailey, the attend- ant, did not realize what had happened until R'eiter struggled to his feet. Reiter said he never got a satis- factory, look at his kidnapers, at least sufficient to identify them, but said they were both weighing between 180 and ?.00 pounds. He said he'doubted the men were wailing for him but thought they were ready to hold any motorist who stopped for ithe light._______ The Turks call the turkey the American bird, since al habitat is North Congress Plunges Back Into Seething Battle Over Price Controls As OPA Goes Out There's of the Border Meat Counters Bare, Packers Warn Only Black Market Is Operating Zoul Denies Nuptial Knots Uulir PORTERHOUSE HAMBURGER TEAK ROASTING mm The headline at top and the photo below, showing a butcher with nothing to do in his meatless shop but read .the newspaper are typical ol the good old U. S. A. today. Tantalizing to me.it- hungry Yanks are ads like those at right, clipped from Canadian papers. Bulk of Target Ships Afloat As Observers Move Into Area To Assess Atom Bomb Damage By DON WHITHHEAD ABOARD USS APPALA- CHIAN OFF BIKINI, July of the 73 old target- warships were sunk and eight others badly damaged in today's spectacular test of the fourth atomic bomb, Vice Adm. W. H. .Blandy reported tonight as ves- sels of his task force move'r) into Bikini lagoon to survey damage. This was based on a cursory in- spection. Many ships arc burning. The total could be higher b} day- break. Whether the atomic bomb will force navies of the world into new construction and battle tac- tics remained the day's big ques- tion. The bomb wrought a great deal of damage to ships anchored in the lagoon but the blast did not sink a capital ship, even though Ihey were directly under the ex- plosion, No Conclusions V.ct Admiral Blandy declined at a press conference to draw any conclusions from the' test. "That's not our he said. "We put facts before the evalua- tion board of the joint chiefs of staff and the evaluation commis- sion of the president and they draw conclusions." Scientists aboard the admiral's flagship said they thought to- day's bomb was about equal in nuclear efficiency to the one used at Nagasaki. A recapitulation of the bomb's destructive power, showed two attack-transports, the Carlisle and the Giilir.m, sunk. The de- stroyer Lamson was capsized and later went and the De- stroyer Anderson was so badly damaged it was expected to sink momentarily. Ba'Wy Damaged Fires stjii feurning late to- night aboard the carrier Inde- pendence, which suffered the greatest damage of any vessel afloat ;md was listing badly. Heavy d a m a e, particularly topside, was done to the battle- ship Arkansas. The Japanese bat- tleship Nagato, the submarine Skate, the heavy cruiser Pcnsa- cola and a hir.k leading ship. Some 25 other vessels received slight damage. One of these was the battleship Pennsylvania, which had n small fire which was put out by a fire- boat. On the deck of Ihe Pennsyl- vania, contentedly chewing hay, were a number of gonts which had been placed aboard to deter- mine the effect of atomic energy on animals. Hear Adm. Thorvald Solbert said the goats "had a gleam in their eye and seemed perfectly happy." There have been no reports of what happened to animals on oth- er ships, particularly those near the center of the lagoon. Underwater Test Next An underwater test of the bomb will be held in the next three or femr weeks. Admiral Biandy said, depend'i-'ig on how soon he -will be able to make pre- parations and get the fleet into position. Today's bomb burst in a huge flash, sending up jjreat multi- colored bails' and a tremendous column of lethal cloud. There was no tidal wave or earthquake as a result. In fact observers r-jported that palm trees on the Jtoll appeared intact. No lives wer lost. Test Called Success Nonetheless Vice Adm. W. H. P. Blandy described the experi- ment as successful and congratu- lated all hands involved. Navy Secretary Furreslal 'likewise (termed the a "well planned and well i.'xei'uled operation. The bomb burst with a blind- ing flash at 'J a.m., (15 p.m., Sun- day, eastern .-.tanciarci time.) Associated Press science writer Blakusleo reported the heart of the resultant cloud was pink, turning.to gold as it shot I up at about quarter of a mile I in [i minute. "The- bomb burst began lo lose its ball shape and he wrote. "As it piiMX'Cfl one cloud layer ubovo another there seemed to be several balls, one above an- other. "After one hour the top of the cloud was Wt'll above feet. This top was n mushroom which hiicl shot out :iml up from the original mush'-oom, but, after one r hour this lop was ii huge, hazy cloud, distinguished from other natural clouds around it only by its slightly color. i "It's shape was that of an ice I cream cone that had nrelted I quite flat. H was probably 20 milus wide." The first craft entered the la- goon within H'ree hours after tho bomb burst, to study radioactivity and combat the fires. A close binocular inspection of j the target ships from the Pana- mint showed that probably no vessel escaped damage, Associ- ated Press Cnri'pspondcnt Paul K. Lee reported, lie said in most cast's, howevn, damage appear- ed small, consisting mainly of bent masts -jud wrecked super- structure. No ntlemp: was being made Intc this afternoon to fight the fire .steadily (.-aling away the car- rier Jiv'.ppfni'lonec1. but fireboats poured heavy streams on tho smoking battleship Pennsylvania, which evidently had been consid- Solons Hope For Extension But Berkley Doesn't Ex- pect Early Senate Action On New OPA Measure WASHINGTON. July The house begun debate on a 20- rl.-iy stop-gap revival of OPA to- day with ;i declaration by Rep. Sabath (IJ-ll.) that some "un- American me; chants already are "gouging" the consumer. The house appeared ready to act quickly on the proposal to restore price controls, but the out- look in the senate WHS dark. WASHINGTON, July Speaker Rayb-.irn forecast after a Whili: House conference today that the house will vote tempor- ary extension of OPA, but senate Majority Lender Barkloy (Ky) held out no hope of early senate action. For 45 minutes congressional leaders with President Truman over the situation cre- ated by the end of OPA last mid- night after Mr. Truman vetoed ;m extension bill which he called "impossible." Unrkley tokl reporters he hop- ed that the somite work out :i more permanent piece of legis- Jalion "that will be Rayburn he expected house to pass a resolution restor- ing price controls for 20 days. Such temporary action, pending permanent legislation was asked by Mr. Truman in his veto mes- sage. Meanwhile OPA is dead. AcroM Couatrjr j Throughout the country, its end i was marked confusion, uncer- I lainly and sharp polilical cross- fire. With OPA rasscd the myriad of regulations that have governed the nation's economy for '.he last four and a half years. (Prices on tho nation's com- modity markets bounded upward as trading rcgan. on the first OPA-less day. Steel, motor, cop- per, rubber and mail order shares rose from to more than share in early trading on the New York stock exchange, (Cotton futures jumped more than S3 n bal" ul Nuw York and rose the limit of at New Or- leans. In C'lic-iigo and Minne- apolis the grain markets respond- ed similarly. Early prices on Chicago livestock market jump- ed from to S2.50 a hundred pounds, vyilh many being held lor still higher O'Danirl Hlock.s Move At tlie canilol as Rarklcv spoke Si.Mintnr O'Diiniel (D-Tox) aRain block' i :m effort by Senator Wagn (D-NY) to introduce in to revive OPA and contir its operations until July 20. O'D I'el fi'st had blocked in- lroduc_.Gii Saturday. Under senate rules, introduc- tion of the continuing resolution now will hav-.-! to be delayed un- til tomorrow Further objections at that limo would delay its con- sideration by n committee until the following dny. "I hope we can work out some- thing accoplaoh> that will extend i the OFA for a Bnrkley said. "If we can do il in one bite instead of two, it will be belter than to pass one temporary measure and then a more permanent one." Barklcy sai'J today's conference with the preS'dent was a "friend- ly" one. The immediate question on Capitol Hill, indeed, throughout the land was: What will happen to the cost of living? No Immediate Assessment Forecasts varied hugely, but most seemed agreed that it would be weeks, not days, before (Continued on Page 2, Column 2) (Continued on Page Column -J) KOCKET DECAYED BY DERAILED FREIGHT WiLBURTON, Okla., July .1, OT; The Rock fsland RouKet was held up seven and one-half hours when a broken rail derailed a freight train operating ahead of it here last midnight. Derailment of the freight pro- bably prevented a similar acci- dent to the Rocket, railroad e.n- ployes here said. The freight, an extra, struck broken rail first. Tlail workers flagged t h e Rocket down at the edge of the yards here and it was held up until 8 a. m.' today while the track was cleared. No one' was injured in the freight derailment. Read The Ada News Want Ads. GOP Leaders Want OPA Rent Controls WASHINGTON, July Republican house leaders today drafted a resolution to reenact OPA rent controls. This resolution, if passed, would block any hikes in rents alreaay announced by landlords OPA orders such a rollback. Rep. Wolcott of Michigan, senior Republican on the house banking committee, announced he would offer the resolution, as he emerged from a meeting in the office of Republican Leader Martin, of Massachusetts. BILL MURRAY HITS AT TRUMAN'S VKTO TISH.OM1NGO, Okla., July J, Oklahoma Governor William 1-1. (Alfalfa BilH Murray has criticised President. Truman's action in vetoing the OPA bill. In an interview, Murray said that the government "has failed and urged every town and city in the nation to organize to urge merchants to hold down prices. '.'It is my the colorful former governor said, "that they want violent inflation because j they know it will produce a dic- tatorship as it did in Germany land Italy, and at the same lime j maneuvering lo blame it all on i congress, when congress is right." Read The Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST Too many folks grow without growin' up. Th' average politician speaks about words in a year, an' "I" am' "mo."   

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