Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 30, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             runnins office be n.min.Ud Tue.d.yn.r wUI ..I of b- is sf.p ,he of Average Net May Paid circulation 8271 Member: Audit llurcau or circulation FHE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 1946 ________________THIRTY PAGES FIVE CENTS THE COPY PRICE, RENT CONTROLS END AT MIDNIGHT Campaigning For Primary Election Drawing To End Six (ounly Offices Not Listed On Tuesday Ballots Interest Increasing Here In Some County, Few State Races The threads of tho first primary campaign have just about ;ill boon wound up, nnci candidates and managers and helpers will go to bed Monday night, hoping the un- winding of tha ball Tuesday will find their thread the longest. But after Monday night that will be in the hands of the voters, gods, arid the election officials. The campaign in this county will be wound up Monday night at Glenwood park. All -county candidates will probably be there, and some stale candidates will have representatives present to give one last invitation to join in saving the state. Six Lack Opponents Voters Tuesday will not find Six county offices listed on the county ballot. The last legislature provided that an unopposed can- didate in a primary will not be on the ballot. So you will not vote ior a county attorney, county clerk, county judge, county as- sessor or county superintendent. Judge W. G. Long did have an opponent for county attorney, but Truman Harrison died before the bullets had been printed, the dem- ocratic central committee did not choose to appoint another to take Truman's place on the ballot, so under the conditions Judge Long was automatically nominated. Claude Bobbin has no opposi- tion for county clerk, Mrs. Delia Bedford none for court clerk. Moss Wimbish none for county judge, Charlej Rushing none for county assessor and Norman Mitchell none for county super- intendent. Managers Hopeful After Tuesday at least two of the four gubernatorial campaign offices here will be closed. Each of the county managers for W C Jones, Roy Turner, Dixie Gilmer and William O. Cue naturally ex- pects to havo his candidate either first or second in the county. Tuesday Vote To Be Heavy Governor's Race Has Drawn General Interest In Current Campaign Moss Wimbish Resigns As County Judge Accepts Position at Profes- sor of Low in Southern Methodist University To Germany Tuesday in tho first step toward electing a governor and n full set of state of- ficials to serve for the next four years. Also to be chosen are eight con- gressmen, a complete state house of representatives and half the slate senate. The voting Tuesday is expected to be conclusive in only a few cases, since nominees 'in most cases will not be selected until the Moss Wimbish resigned late rn-, June I Friday as countv iudee to aerpn estimated Okla- a position as pmfessor of law Fn homans.wtll -jast ballots Tuesday Southern iS Dallas. of the city Saturday arm could not be reach- ed for a statement. The resignation will leave it to the county commissioners to ap- point a successor to fill out the unexpired term, which ends early in January. The resignation applies to the term he is holding now. He is unopposed for democratic nomi- nation to succeed himself, 'and by the present law is already the democratic nominee. If he files official notice that he does not want the office another term, the executive committee of the dem- ocratic party will select a nom- inee to appear on the ballot for the general election in November according to Joe.Beck, secretary of the county election board and chairman of the executive com- mittee. Of course, he can remain on the ticket and be. elected in November if he prefers. Judge Wimbish was for many years a teacher before he studi- ed law. For a long time he was on the faculty of, the Ada high school and was considered an primary July 23. Both will have virtually full runoff parties _ ...____ __f tickets to present at the Novem- ber general election. The only statewide race which has drawn any general interest in the current campaign has been thai for governor, in which name- calling, charges and counter-char- ges arose as the campaign reached its climax. Crowds at the1 tradi- tional "speakings" were for the most part disappointing to aspir- Struggling Candidates for places in thc democratic: runoff are eight can- didates. The urcatesl part of the attention has been drawn by four, Roy J. Tumor. Oklahoma City oil man, rancher, and former-presi- dent of tho Oklahoma City school board: H. C. Jones, Oklahoma Jity. former U. S. collector of in- ternal revenue for Oklahoma; Dixie Gilmer, Tulsa county at- torney, and William O. Coe, Okla- homa City attorney and only World War II veteran in the race. Other democratic candidates are R. M. McCool, Norman, former Norman city manager, one-time president of Murray State school of agriculture at Tishomingo and ionner democratic state chair- man: Johnson D. Hill, Tulsa in- surance company executive and former speaker of the house; Fred cellent instructor. ex- Southern Methodist University ranks high in higher educational circles, and it is considered a high honor for a school man to be on .its faculty. Polio Victim Dies Friday Night At Children's Hospital A-Bomb Tesl No Action Is Taken Interest in tne race for Mt'Cuff. Scminolc oil field c'quip- dealer, and Earl R. Powers, three democrats trying to unseat LyJe H. Boron, has risen since the congressman came home and started a whirlwind campaign to sell the voters on his record in the congress. Interest has also picked up in the state senator race, two candidates from this county, Virgil Mccilock and Otto Strickland, endeavoring to Allen G. Nichols of We- woka. _ Much interest has been shown in the district judge race. While tne district comprises three coun- ties, this counly is a nominating district, and the campaign is here confined to this eounfv. Hoyt former county Sapulpa painter's helper. Pillion Withdraws The name! of a ninth candidate, Jess L. Pullen will appear on the appear on the ballot, but he has announced his withdrawal and is campaigning lor Jones. Three candidates are seeking the republican nomination, fore- most oC whom is Olnoy F. Flynn, former mayor of Tulsa. Others arc Rex ford B. Craig, Chandler contractor and builder, and Harry E. Ingram, Tulsa contractor. Seven of tho state's eight .con- gressmen are seeking re-election Hep. Paul Stewart, third district democrat, having retired from the race for re-election because of his health. The remaining seven are ex- pected to win their way through to the runoff, although one or irr in tne three county commis- j more may face a tussle to win out sipners district races, and the I in the second round, iheriff s office. Expect Heavy Vote Some of the races will be sot- Plans Are Set Baring Storm, Bomb Be Dropped Approximately At P. M. CST By DON WHITEHEAD ABOARD U. S. S. APPALA- CHIAN, BIKINI, Sunday, June 30, UP> Despite a sudden cloud- ing up in the weather Vice Adtn. W. H. P. Blandy gave the signal today for the start of history's greatest, military the dropping of an atomic bomb on the target fleet in Bikini la- goon. The atomic test force com- mander announced that barring a storm the bomb would be drop- 'ped at approximately a. m., Bikini time p. m. Sunday central standard time.) (Radio reports from Bikini said Admiral Blandy had advanced the time of the drop one hour.) The evacuation of Bikini la- goon is now under way. Vessels To 'Upeii Sea Some military personnel, scientists, correspondents and ob- j servers must be clear of the la- goon by 5 p. m., leaving only skeleton crews to make last-min- ute adjustments to the scores of instruments, cameras and record- ing equipment aboard ships and on islands of Bikini atoll. The bulk of the non-target fleet is steaming out of the lagoon, which only a few months ago was a little known region inhabit- ed by a few score natives who have been evacuated to another island. Patrol ships are busy shepherd- ing vessels into the open sea. Every ship and every man must be out of- the lagoon two hours before the bomb is detonated. Ghost Fleet Left Then all that will be left will be the ghost fleet: silent ships on which there will be. no human being. The craft will stand a- round the bulls eye Nevada as guinea pigs qf the first test 'of atomis power against ships. Presumably, engineers began By Congress on Bill Fight Is Not Over President Tells Public WASHINGTON, June 29, Price and rent controls come to a halt at midnight Sunday, but President Truman told the people tonight that the fight tot them "is not over." The chief executive, in a broad- cast over all networks, appealed straight to the people to make it knawn to congress their own determination "to retain price controls and so prevent infla- tion." And during the Japse in con- trols, he said he knew the coun- try could depend upon the patri- osim and good sense of its citizens He added: "Therefore, I call upon everj MRS.. BOB SOUTHERN began, today thejong trip from the ConWoJrd thf B-29 home of her parents, Mr. ;and Mrs. W. C. Pritchett, 800 South Constant, to-Frankfurt, Germany, where she'will" make her home for the next two years with her husband, Paratrooper Lt..Bob who. has been in .Germany for the past pven months.. During, those seven months, Mrs. Southern Louis Eugene Phillips, son of has', kept herself gathering dishes, curtains and home> which will be in" an 'American' vvLsi iviciiii, wno was UKen to tne riictrir-f in judge and belore county attorney, that assistant is endeavoring to unseat Tal Crawford. In the county races, most inter- est of recent ajys appears to con- Oklahoma City Crippled Chil- dren's hospital suffering from Polio Thursday afternoon died Friday night. "_ There was two cases reported Thursday to Dr. R. H. Mayes, city-county health unit He said late Saturday that no other cases had been reported to him and that he did not know the con- dition of the second youngster. Funeral services will be con- ducted this afternoon (Sunday) at 2 o'clock from the CrisweU Fu- neral Chapel with Rev. I. L. Huh- nicutt of Stratford officiating. Survivors include the parents, a sister, Sharon Phillips; a broth- er, Gary Wayne Phillips; grand parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Phil- lips and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Scar- borough. district in the German city, complete with shopping area for American wives, Two More Farm to Market t Roads Approved for County Approval Comes from State Highway Cor mission On Recommendation of Two Pbntotoc Commissioners tled Tuesday, while others will continue until the final primarv on July 23. If only two candidates are running in a race, there will be no run-off, but if there are more than tw.. there may be and may not be a run-off, depending upon whether or not any one can- didate gets a majority of Un- votes cast. If one does gel a ma- jority, he wins regardless of the number in the race against him. Registration been active and many observers believe it wjl- be a heav-y vote City Civic Leader Dies Incumbents seeking re-election are W. G. Stipjor, Stigler, second district; Lylo Borcn, Seminole, fourth; Mike Monroney, Oklaho- ma City, fifth; Jed Johnson, sixth, a net Victor Wickorsham, Man- gum. seventh, all democrats, and George B. Schwabo, Tulsa, first, and Koss Rix.loy, Guymon, eighth. both republic-tins. Carl Tlircc After Place Albert, McAloster, and OKLAHOMA CITY, June 20, county women's civic and politi- i mino. prllni Bill Slcgcr. Durant. both attor- neys, and Bayless Irby, Boswcll, stnle senator and druggist, ..are locked in a Hit co-way race for the democratic nomination to succeed Stewart. Voters Tuesday will also 'cast ballots I'or a lieutenant governor, secretary of state, slate auditor, attorney general, state treasurer, state superintendent, state ex- aminer and inspector, commis- sioner of labor, commissioner of charities and corrections, clerk of the supreme court, corporation chief and assistant one judge of the I breeding. Ada Spray Program May Be Completed Monday Afternoon The spraying of the southwest district of Ada with DDT will be completed early Monday morn- ing, Mayor LUke Dodds said Sat- urday afternoon, and added fur- ther that the trucks will be in the northeast and southeast districts Monday morning. Two trucks loaded with DDT have sprayed two districts of the city and at each stop the item sprayed gets a bath of the solu- tion that helps eradicate flies. Mayor Dodds started the fly eradication program several days ago and found the ready to cooperate in the program that is designed to help prevent In- fantile Paralysis. The DDT is sprayed on gar- bage cans and any other place that might be a location for fly Two more farrh to market projects for Pontotoc county have been approved by the state.high- way commission pn. recommenda- tion- of Earf V.. farker, county commissioner for district 1, arid George R. Collins, commissioner for district 2. This makes the secondi project in each district. Contracts will be let by the state commission as soon as engineer- ing work is done and construc- tion should get under way this summer, according plans. to present cal organizations through '15 turn- criminal court of appeals, two _ i i i f( f I I, j t cai organizations through '15 turn- v v-uun ui appeals, iwo ultuous years of growth, died to- .supreme court, and day in a hospital here. She moved to Oklahoma City in 1901 where she became inter- ested in political questions of tho times. She founded the first po- litical women's club here, the Jef- fersonian democratic club, and was president for 18 years. IWEATHER! Oklahoma Partly cloudy warmer Sunday, high in lower to middle 90's; partly cloudy with local thundershoxvers northeast Sunday night and east and south central Monday, cooler Monday. v i_u wl t, i iv, o u i u 111 C: U U I a full set of district judges. Other officers whose terms ex- ire this your are unopposed for re-nomination. Among the more important ones not involved in primary races arc Joe C. Scott, president of tho state board of agriculture: Jess G. Head, state insurance commissioner, and su- preme court Justice N. S.' Corn, all democrats. The mayor said that the spray- ing would have possibly been completed Saturday afternoon if the process had not been stopped by rain that fell Friday night. Spray truck operators have been having some difficulty spraying all the places that they thought best because a number of small houses, and barns were locked when the trucks stopped. NKW NAMED TO NOWATA SCHOOLS NOWATA, Okla., June 29. UP) W. Martin, 41, superinten- dent of schools at Commerce, Okla., for the last 13 years, was named head of Nowala city schools effective Monday, school TULSA DENTIST DROWNS WHILE FISHING IN CREEK TULSA, Okla., June 29 Dr. Fred Parsley, 49, Tulsa den- tist, drowned today while fishing in a small creek five miles east of the city. The 1945 production of broilers i ._ i .t laujl uj. UHJ1 EiS board President O. D. BlackweH I reached a new high of 312 million' part terfd The project in Mr. Parker's dis- trict is south and southwest of Allen and constitutes a little more than five miles. The road begins south of Allen on High- way 48, goes west one mile, a half mile south and west almost two miles to the intersection with Highway 12 at Lakeside. Another ;t goes north to Allen and ex- fds a half mile .within the city limits of Allen so as to connect with Highway 48. Fills Gap This road will connect High-' ways 12 with a WPA road in Hughes county, going east to-: Gerty. It will fill in a gap in the roads around Allen, giving the- farmers in' that area direct contact with Allen and the high- way leading out of Allen in two or three directions. Another part of this project in Mr. Parker's district is miles just north and east of Ada. It starts three miles north of Ada and goes east a mile and a half from the pavement on Highway 99 and then comes south three miles to the country- club corner. This touches the edge of some oil production on the north end and comes through a heavily populated-, district. Opens Area The road in Mr. Collins? district begins at Highway of Bebee, goes 3.2 miles north, west two miles, and north three miles going by Worstell school and by the Maxwell cemetery, .at will open up an arjsa in the northwest part of the county that has been to a fiieat extent shut off in bad weather. It-will be: 8.2' miles long. It will serve three 'school districts. Dream" shortly after Blandy made his decision on the weath- er. As soon as possible after day- break, the pilot of the superfor- tress Major Woodrow P. Swan- cutt of Wisconsin Rapids, will take off and the fleet of air- craft assigned to the show will begin maneuvering into position. The other planes will carry came- ras, recording instruments, newsmen, observers and mem- Truman's and the business man, every producer and every landlord to adhere to exis- ting regulations even though foi a short period they may not have the effect of law. It would be contrary to their own interest to embark upon a reckless period of inflation. It if to their own in- terest to exercise self restraint until some action can be obtained from the congress. Request To Employees "I also request every employe of the OPA to stay at his battle station. The fight is not over." Whether price controls which come off at least for the time be- ing at midnight tomorrow cnn be restored is an open question. Con- gress, however, appeared bent on reaching some decision early Monday. A temporary end of restrictions was assured today when Mr. Tru- bers of President evaluation commission (Cbirtinuedon Page 2 Col. 1) Chocfaw, Chickasaw Groups Schedule Three Meetings Cquncilmen of the Choclaw and Chickasaw Confederation will meet July 5 at 1 p. m. at Atoka and July 6 has been set for a general meeting of the group. Eli P. Goforth, president of the local unit, said Saturday Ada 7 ouva me i Mrta JIllv i nr n ill .joint chiefs of staff evaluation in ThPs the Board of Regents Proposes More (ash For Stale. Colleges OKLAHOMA June- 29 M. A. Nash, chancel- lor of the Oklahoma regents for higher today estima- i ted state-owned colleges may re- I JinrouSn space toward the Neva- board. The human beings nearest the explosion probably will be those aboard the Mt. McKincly, some eight miles from the point of blast. Planes In Area There will be a veritable sky aramada weaving an intricate pattern in the skies above the tar- get fleet, with pilotless "drones" being herded through the air by "mother" planes to record the iurbutence and radioactivity of the cloud mass rising from the explosition. Swancutt will climb to about feet while other planes are moving into position. Then Kh? sale to discuss other tri- le will make the bomb run, with Dal Major Harold H. Wood of Bor- dentown, N. J., the bombardier, :aking over the job of dropping the missile about six miles ceive additional financial aid, amounting to as much as I Ine Destroyer O Bnen wil 000, twice the amount PstimntpH' downwind 35 miles from the announced. I ninefold increase since 1934. j (Continued on Page 6 Column 1) 000, twice the amount estimated by Tom G. Sexton, administration assistant to the regents.'as the re- sult of a ruling by the attorney general. Attorney General Mac Q. Wil- liamson ruled yesterday state- owned institutions of higher edu- cations, could "contract indivi- dually" with the Veterans Ad- ministration for "fair and reason- able" reimbursement based on the instructional costs serving veterans attending school under the GI Bill of Rights. Dr. Nash said the additional funds would be "a life saver, es- pecially for some of the smaller institutipns." The funds will sup- plement present budgets. Under ..Oklahoma LWA, the state institutions of higher edu- cation had been unable to charge tuition to.students who reside in the state. Thus they missed fed- eral government revenue, guar- anteed up to per nine-month school year for servicemen at- tending college. The attorney general's opinion held that the law prohibited the state from taking tuition from individual students, but was no bar to acceptance of reimburse- ment from the federal govern- ment. affair will be an open session. There has been considerable progress made in the sale of the Choctaw-Chickasaw asphalt land and deposits and other matters of importance will be brought up before the councilmen at the July 5 meeting. The meeting is for the purpose of informing the council of the progress made and for the con- sideration of the future actions of the executive committee. Tribal officials have assured W. W. Short, president of the group, that they will be present at the July 6 meeting to report the pro- gress made on the negotiations of House Affirms Veto, Adjourns Until Monday By The Associated Preci WASHINGTON, June and rent controls coma off, at least temporarily, at night Sunday. Now the question is whether they can be revived. A lapse was assured today by three actions: President Truman's sharp vcta of congress' version of OPA ex- tension, which he said would "lead to disaster." He said the ac- tion which congress finally took would visit a "great calamity" upon the nation. A house vote of 1-12 to sustain and 173 to override the veto. 38 short of the two-thirds necessary to pass the measure over his head. Senate adjournment until Mon- day without action on a tempo- rary extension, and a house agreement not to vote until then on keeping controls past the deadline which comes with, expir- ation of the present price control law. No Action Vhe senate quit in the midst of frantic efforts by the leadership in both houses to get action on temporary Senator Wherry backed by Senator O'DnnicI (D.- Tex.} find others, had just turned down n plea for unanimous agreement even to permit intro- duction of the extension bill to- day. Wherry said he could not con- sent because even th.-it much of a concession "might hold out !iope to the president" for even- tual passage. SUGAR MAY STAY WASHINGTON. June rationing probably will continue despite OPA ex- piration at midnight tomor- row, OPA spokesmen said to- day. Sugar, lust of the wartime scarcity foods to remain under ration control, is rationed by OPA under authority from the department of agriculture which the depart- ment can recapture on short notice. It is likely, price officials said, that Secretary of Agri- culture Anderson will move promptly to take the job per- haps aided by a White House executive order transferring OPA s sugar rationing staff to the agriculture department. To stuck to that position in the Father of Local Baker Dies Here Felix F. B. -Copeland, father of Charles Copelnnd, A d a baker, died Saturday morning at a local hospital. Funeral services will be The Destroyer O'Brien will be nvnwind 35 miles from the tar- get and the Destroyer R. K. Hun- lington will be 50 miles south- west of the target, acting as ref- erence or guide ships to "Dave's Dream" on the bombing run. But once the bomb explodes, the. two destroyers will begin a race with death to escape the radioactive cloud which will be driven by the wind in their direc- tion. Once safely out of the path of the cloud, the destroy-, ___ ers will circle and keep track of i Copeland of its movements. ducted from the Methodist church in Geary Monday after- noon at 4 o'clock. Smith Funer- al home will be in charge of ar- rangements. Burial will be at the Geary cemetery. Survivors include three sons, Charles Copeland of Ada, George OKLAHOMA CITY, 'June 29, applicants have passed the.state bar examinations given earlier .this month, John G. Hervey, executive secretary of the Oklahoma State Bar Associa- tion, announced today. Among the successful candi- R. H. Northcolt Is Seriously III R. H. (Uncle Dick) Northcutt of Coalgate is seriously ill at the home of his Mrs. Faye Brecheen, 528 North Francis. He was' brought to Ada Jan. 1 for treatment and remained three months during which time he was reported improved. He and his wife returned to their home in Coalgate. His condition be- came worse this month and he was returned to Ada. Those visiting him Robert Copeland of Stamford, Tex.; a daughter, Mrs. E. O. Zweiscrier of Geary; three sisters, Mrs. George Bilbrey of Amarillo, Tex., Mrs. Sarah Bilbrey of Liv- ingston, Tenn., and Miss Winnie Copeiand of Livingston, Tenn.; a brother. Lewis Copeland of Hous- ton, Tex., and 13 grand children. Area Welcomes 1.60 Inch Rain A total of 1.60 inches of rain fell Friday night arid Saturday morning and the high tempera- face of an acknowledgement by Senator Barkley the majority leader, that "it is not humanly possible that this bill could be enacted between now and Sunday midnight, and OPA will lapse anyway." Chairman Wagner (D.-N.Y.) ot the banking committee planned to introduce the extender Mon- day, but Senator Taft (H.-Ohio) said he was sure objections could hold off action at least until July And, said Taft, if OPA lapses for a week "it will be almost im- possible to revive it." Extension In Hopper On the house side, an exten- sion resolution got into the Hop- per, offered by Chairman Spence (D.-Ky.) of the banking commit- tee, but an objection from Rep. Wolcott (R.-Mich.) blocked im- mediate action and sent it to committee. The rules committee cleared the Spence proposal for house action shortly after the senate quit, but no independent house keep OPA going, a two-thirds voto action could Furthermore, would be iHH'ess.iry to suspend the rules and pnss the measure before it h.-ici lain over a day. The rules committee okayed (Continued on Page 6 Column 1) J weekend include a nephew, Horace Hannon of Dallas; a niece, Mrs. Ray McDonald and daughter of Dallas: Mrs. Rosie Lee Sutton of Amarillo, Mrs. Ida Nesmith of Denison, Mrs. Rosie Sawyer of Sherman and his three sons, Horace of Oklahoma City, Lee of McAlester and Clyde of Coalgate. Other visitors were Mrs. John lure was 87 degrees, according to over the j W. E. Pitt at the Greenhouse. J I VKH-A VJOituio VVCHT 1VA13. UUI1IJ dales was Guinn. Menard Fisher, I Baker, Mrs. Jim Baker and Mrs. Ada. I Cunningham of Ada. Rain totaling 3.05 inches fell before 7 a.m. Saturday and an- other .55 fell before noon adding to the total of the badly needed rain. The maximum temperature was reached about the middle of the afternoon Saturday. The forecast for Sunday is partly cloudy skies with temper- atures expected to roach 90 de- i grees during the day. TH' PESSIMIST IIy noli lilaiikii. Jr. When it comes t' brains, these days nearly all o' us could stand a new wrinkle er two. Don't ever bet on whut a woman, a country jury er th' U. S. Senate will do.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication