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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 23, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 23, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Probably the reason Hie Hollywood actress marrying her fifth husband wouldn't have the traditional wedding march from Lohengrin was that she knew it so well that it bores her now. Averajt Net May Paid Circulation 8271 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 59 t ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JUNE 23, 1946 28 PAGES TODAY FIVE CENTS THE COPX Political Fever, Fanned By Last-Stretch Campaigning, Developing Fast In County Filing Flurry For Council Five Men After Af-Large Place on City Council For Election of July 2 A last-minute flurry of filing brought the total of' candidates for council member representing the city at large to five. Filing- closed Saturday and the vote will take place ori Tuesday, July 2. To be elected are five council members, one from each ward and one at large. These will em- ploy a city manager under the recently voted council manager form of government and will supervise the administration of city affairs. The run-off vote will be held on July 16 if such vote is requir- ed. As the filings now stand, they are: Ward J. Huddgleston. Ward Charles F. Spen- cer. Ward Hensley. Ward Pink Norwood. Roberts ?.nd At-Large Luther Hudgens, Walker Hisle, Ollic Coleman, M. (Continued on Page 9 Column 6) An Election On Tuesday School District.to Vote On Building Fund Levy; Mor- rison Explains Plan 1 There will be an election in Ada on Tuesday, June 25. On that day, voters of'School District 19, which includes. Ada and some adjoining territory, will ballot on a five-mill build- ing fund levy. All voting will be done at Convention hall. Supt. Rex O. Morrison explains that it is similar to the one voted a year ago that has raised ap- proximately in building funds. But su.ch accumulation of building funds, he explains fur- ther, school officials here hope and plan to acquire such funds without necessity of a bond issue which would require payment of interest over 20 years along with the principal. growth and expansion huve already crowded local schools, especially the grade schools, seriously, the superinten- dent says. Two of the older build- ings arc in need of replacement and any building program will call for providing for Ada's in- creasing number of school chil- dren. Registration Periods for Ada Residents Overlap for Time Two More Days To Complete Trash Collection Here Ada's trash collection drive was supposed to be com- pleted Monday is going to take an extra day. according to Mayor Luke Dodds. Saturday the trucks out for their third day and the of trash being picked tip was much heavier than ex- pected. The northwest and southwest part of town along with the negro section had been covered by Sat- urday evening, leaving only half the city cleaned up. Trucks will cover the north- east section Monday and the southeast pnrt next Tuesday and it is hoped that all the trash cnn be collected by then. This collection is made in con- nection with the fly eradication program which begins Thursday. Trained men operating the best of equipment will then spray nil garbage cans, horse lots and other fly breeding locations with DDT. Residents of the city are urged to have their garbage containers empty and clean by Thursday morning. Three Groups Hit Al Bowies' Plan WASHINGTON, June 22, Three organizations representing cattle raisers and milk producers today expressed "strong disappro- val and resentment" of Chester Bowies' effort to get a one year strike truce from labor in return lor stabilized prices. The three the American Na- tional Livestock Association, the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association and the Na- tional Cooperative Milk Produc- ers Federation issued a joint statement in which they said: "If the government follows the plan outlined by Mr. Bowles, it means "1. Appeasement of one branch of our society by the virtual en- slavement of agriculture. ''2. Attempts to secure from the aopeased_ segment of society tot- ally unbinding and unenforceable promises. "3. Control of all the products of agriculture for the particular benefit of those who .use those' products and to the material det- 1 Special Elections Making This Unusual Registration, Voting Year Citizens of Ada whp UreT'other- wise qualified for voting are hav- ing more opportunities than usual to register this week. For the entire county, registra- tion for the first primary of July 2 ended Friday at midnight. June 23, which is today, opens the registration period for the run- off primary July 23. That left a small gap-r-but wait! Ada voters cast their ballots July 2 on members of the new city council and on July 14 in the run-off el oction for council places, and as registration begins 30 days and closes 10 days before an elec- tion the period for that July 16 council race run-off started back somewhere about June 15 or 16 and continues until July 6. So there was an overlap of registration after nil. Unless some special election bobs up between the July 23 run- off vote and the general election of Nov. 5, the registrars won't have to slay so close to home un- til 30 days Nov. 5. Registration in the city of Ada has been almost continuous since early was the city primary in March, followed three weeks later by the city run-off primary for election of city com- missioners.' Then there was the vote in May the voters freeholder board's recommendations for a charter change. So, for Ada especially, this has been a registering, votin' year sure enough. -------------k------------ We wonder what made people ring doorbell', before bath tubs for 'folks to sit in. The way of a man with a maid often depends on how watchful his wife is. Races Spiced By Lafe Charges Among Some of Leaders County Races Pushing Into Prominence Now; Two Rallies This Week With the Louis-Conn affair out of the way, attention here is turning .steadily to the winding up of this year's political melee, reaching its finale'a week from Tuesday, on July 2. On beyond that date stretches, for many candidates, .the' prospecl of arduous campaigning until the run-off primary of July 23, but that period is .getting little con- sideration as the closing drive for votes for July 2 hits its peak. Two county rallies -are sche- duled for this week Tuesday night, Jurie 25, at Fitzhugh and Thursday night, June 27, at Steedman. HThe big closing coun- ty rally will be held in Glen- wood Park on Monday night, July I..--' Apathy Disappears Instead of the .apathy evident generally in earlier weeks, the rampaign is nearing fever heat', and already there" is. talk of a big vote. Leading the parade of vote- seekers are the men wanting the nomination for'governor. One of them, William Coe, is scheduled to speak in Ada next Wednesday night, at Glenwoqd Park. Lunsford P. Livingston, Sem- inole, campaigning for democra- tic nomination as Fourth district congressman, Friday night spoke here, making a vigorous plea for votes in the coming primary. He is a veteran of W.orld'-.War II, is an attorney and is making his first race for congress.'-.. Boren Htf e Monday Night The is. seeking..tp.'jd.'s-' on or not would accept the speak in Ada Monday night u'clock on the courthouse lawn. Boren is challenged by several opponents this ,-all of them from "across the river" and all seeking the vote of Ponto- toc, Coal and Johnston counties- on this side of South The three .county commissioner races continue to furnish most of the fuel for the county candida- cies, although the- races for sheriff, district judge and ty treasurer portion of interest. The leaders 'in the state cam- paigning are 'stirring up last- stretch ammunition that, threa- tens to finish of the races as sizzling as the weather is likely to be along about voting day. HALLANAN TEMPORARY HEAD OF OIL ADVISORY WASHINGTON, June Hallanan of Charleston, W. Va., took over today as tem- porary chairman of the newly- created oil industry advisory committee yesterday at an organ- ization meeting. Hallanan is, president of the- Plymouth Oil Co. The committee, similar to the warhrrte petroleum council, will work with the interior depart- ment's oil and gas division, set up' last month to take over some of the functions, of the abolished pe- troleum administration for war. Fifty-three .oil-industry repre- sentatives and department offi- cers attended -the organization, meeting with Secretary of the Interior Krug yesterday. Halla- nan, chosen at this meeting, will appoint the advisory committee, of 15 members. Russia Vetoes General Peace Meeting Call Soys Foreign Ministers Not For Enough Along In Work; Byrnes Wants It Soon By JOSEPH DYNAN PARIS, June (JP) Russia rejected today another American attempt to convoke the general European peace conference July 15 on grounds that the confer- ence of foreign ministers was not yet far 'enough along in its work, an American informant said. The ministers then decided to set next Friday as a deadline for work on the Italian, and Balkan treaties, and to speed' up their: Sc- tivities by meeting twice daily in- stead of once. Soviet Foreign 'Minister V.' M. Molotov said he would be ready at the end of ;next week to size up the council's progress to .date, French informants added. Byrnes For Action Now U. S. Secretary of State James F. Byrnes .appealed for. the min- isters to send out invitations now to. the 21-nation peace conference, to. keep in session right .up to July 15 if necessary, and to let the lar- ger conference pass on any differ- ences which still remain, British and American sources said. declared that the minis- ters so near agreement on peace treaties that there could be no harm in sending out invita- tions' an American source said. Byrnes told the ministers that if they, could not agree on the treaties they should admit -their failures and let someone else take over the larger peace conference or the -United Nations assembly, the American informant said. Left OK Trieste Today consent the conference did not consider" the keystone question of Trieste and the Italo- Yugoslav at today's ses- sion, which was devoted mainly to issues of procedure; informants said.. It was believed that- the. minis- OPA And Draft Continuance Up For Decision This Week Roff Pioneer Club Meets Here E. C. Student Total Given Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. vetopmen'tsC'iri 'Washington and Moscow on last night's private dinner talks between Byrnes and Molotov, which were followed to- day by a transatlantic telephone conversation between Byrnes and President Truman. Molotov was expected to consult with Moscow. New Materials For Vet Housing Soon Government to Dismantle Surplus Army Camps, Plants for Materials WASHINGTON, June 22, Wholesale dismantling of surplus army camps and other projects to provide .material'-for veterans' housing will begin shortly, the government announced tonight. The program is expected to make: available enough lumber for three bedroom houses, it was estimated informally. The over-all quantity to La obtained is officially calculated at feet or more. The salvaged lumber is due to begin flowing into housing .chan- nels within 60 days. The. engineer corps will have 15 'dismantling jobs well under way by August 1, another 15 by Sept. 1 and 20 more by October i, the war assets administration and the national housing agency announced. -v The encampments and'plants to be raised have not been chosen. Most Americans don't know which side thnir bread is .buttered on, says, a coVlege professor. We don't even know where the bread and Summer Session Passing of Whom 269 Are War Veterans .Enrollment figures1 at the col- lege have, finally been completed. Harvey Faust, registrar, reports that there are 744 students en- rolled in the college in general and about 250 in the Horace Mann training school, which with the addition of the several new stu- dents who will attend the Lead- ership workshop beginning Mon- day should push the total past The largest class by far is the freshman class, which has 284 members. The senior class has 173 members to hold second place while the sophomores are third with 150. The smallest class, strangely enough, is the junior class which has only 137 mem- bers. It also has the smallest number of vets enrolled. Of the 269 veterans going to school at East Central, 115 are married and at present most are making their home in Ada. There are throe women vets taking classes. One is an ex-WAVE, one nn ex-WAC and the other a mem- ber of the Marine Corps Womens Auxiliary. The Vets arc fairly well distrib- uted in their classes with the ex- ception of the freshman class which naturally has more, 112 to be exact. Forty-two are sopho- mores, 22 are juniors and 33 hold the rating of seniors. Pictured above are women who attended an all day meeting recently of the Roff Pioneer Club in the home of Mrs. F. R. Laird, Ada. Members and guests are as follows: Seated left to right: Mrs. E. L. Harmon of Tulsa, Mrs. Elizabeth Bickel of Ada, Mrs. Lon Rea of Madill and. Mrs. E. P. Downing of Shawnee. Kneeling from left to right: Mrs. Arlene Hughes of Ada, Mrs. C. C. Cooper of Okla- homa City, Mrs. W. E. Chamberlain of Ada and Mrs. Lula Phillips Kitch of Rocky Ford, Colo. Standing, from left to right: Mrs. Sarah McClintock of Ada, Mrs. O. S. Brimmett of Shawnee, Mrs. G. J. Morton of Ada, Mrs. Ethel.Smith of Roff, Mrs. Iva Zorn of Ada, Mrs. I. D. Nichols of Roff, Mrs. Docia Smith of Oklahoma City, Mrs. Bert Ratliff of Ada. Mrs. A. J. Crain of Ada, Mrs. Josephine Bullock of Madill, Mrs. Delia Bedford of Ada, Mrs. Mabel Rucker of Roff, Mrs: E; E. Bronaugh of Ada, Mrs. R. F. Crumley of Ar- nie Harbert of Ada, Mrs. E. E. Matthews of Enid; Mrs. A. D. Allen of Ada and Mrs. Laird of Ada. Conferees Approve Five Amendments That Bowles Had Denounced as 'Booby Traps' Jr riment them." of those who pfoduce The government has author- ized an increase in the price of dairy machinery. What do they use it for? Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Classified Ads. JWEATH Oklahoma: Generally fair Sun- day and Monday except few wide- ly scattered showers or thunder- storms south half Sunday after- noon and night; slightly warmer Monday. By FRANCIS J. WASHINGTON, June senators and house members working out differences in price control extension legis- lation today approved five out of six amendments denounced as "booby traps" by Stabilization Director Chester Bowles. Simultaneously, the conferees announced themselves in agree- ment on all but four major points of dispute.. They will meet again Monday night in an attempt to resolve those remaining differences and push the bill first to the house, then to the senate, for final ap- proval. Time was pressing the con- forces. Price control expires at midnight, Sunday, June 30, un- less congress acts to extend it and the president approves the legis- lation. May Not Reach Agreement The four points still in dispute are fundamental in character. Senator Downey one of the conferees, told a reporter thnl "an irripasse still is possible." Still to be settled are: 1. How long to extend OPA. The senate voted for one year, the house for nine months. 2. Whether to end price con- trols June 30 on meat, poultry and dairy products, tobacco and petroleum, as provided by the senate. The house did not specifi- cally take controls off any com- modity. 3. Establishment of a decontrol board with authority- to override the price administration onMiit- ing of controls from ndri-agr'icul- tural products, and the secretary of agriculture on farm commodi- ties. 4. The size and duration of food subsidies. The house voted for a subsidy fund with food subsidies tfarred after next May 1. Dropped One Bowles Idea The conference eliminated a sixth provision recommended by Bowles which would have re- quired OPA to obtain the consent of the federal district. attorney before starting enforcement prosecutions. throughout the industry' in ques-, tion since, then. A ban against requiring whole- .salers and retailers of "reconver- sion" items such as automobiles and household appliances to take less'-than the established peace- time mark-ups and discounts. Eliminate OPA "MAP" Elimination of OPA's "MAP" or maximum average price order which was issued to keep clothing manufacturers producing low- pricengarments.-ln a related pro- fng, Vhe marine fintS, -resized Marine Surprised When He Found Oul Kindly Man Who Gave Him 30-Mile Ride to His Home Was Pres. FREDERICK, Md., June 22, marine was trudging along the road about five miles from Washington today trying to hitch a. ride. The day was sultry and he was not having much luck. Finally, however, a long, shiny automo- j turn to Tehran, bile with its top down stopped I Russia announced May 23 that and a be-spectacled man in the she had completed evacuation of rear seat smilingly beckoned him her -nilitary forces from Iran on to hop in. May 9. For the next 30 miles they rode along together. The man seemed interested in the marine's war record so the devildog told him how he helped take Iwo and was wounded there. The two hit it off in fine style. When the car stopped on the outskirts of Frederick and was met by a special detail of police and. other men of official bear- American Military Representatives In Iran Were Jailed TEHRAN, June William T. Sexton, of Leaven- worth, Kas., American military attache in Tehran, returned from Tabriz today and reported that he and three aides were jailed for eight hours by Azerbaijan dem- ocrats in the Azerbaijan capital. A spokesman said the Ameri- can embassy had protested to the Iranian government. Jailed with Sexton were Capt. Archie Roosevelt, -grandson of President Theodore Roosevelt, Maj. Carl P. Carver mid Master Sgt. David Livingstone. "I am unable to explain the Sexton said. He said the Americans went to Tabriz by plane on a flight that had been previously cleared through all competent Iranian au- thorities, 'including the customs and security officials." At the same time an official of the Iranian foreign ministry said the Russians remained in control of an airport at Pahlevi, Iranian Every Member Was In Roff by 1905, Most Of Them Before That Residents and former residents of Roff, who lived in that com- _ _____ munity before and shortly after contended, however, thnl by veto- the'turn of tho century, met May lnG the bill Mr. Truman could Packed With Vote Effects Whether Congress DOM Or Does Not Act, Results Im- portant Politically Now By CLAIR JOHNSON WASHINGTON, June segments of the Tru- man legislative uation of OPA and the come up next week for congres- sional judgments that will have heavy political repercussions whichever way they P.O. Leaders in both Democratic and Republican camps were in agreement today that what they and the president do before next week-end will have bifj voter sig- nificance. But as they tightened belts for a week of heavy sessions on those and other "must" meas- ures, their estimates of how the voters will take it varied right along with their voting plans. Pressure. High On OPA Bill The fight over OPA Is regarded as the most significant politically. Public interest in this has reach- ed a near-fever pitch and terrific pressure is being put on both key congressmen and the president regarding the outcome. Also on tap are final votes on a batch of vital appropriation bills and on legislation extending wartime authority for federal al- location of scarce materials. The pressure is on in all these cases because the present laws run out at the end of the fiscal year, June 30. Other Decisions Looming In addition, decisions may on: (1) Domestic control of atom- ic energy; (2) President Truman's proposed reorganization of fed- eral and (3) New labor legislation. Scheduled action on the British loan bill has been postponed a week. If the president vetoes the final yersio'n of the OPA measure be- ing worked out by senate and house conferees some of law makers said privalely. the public will blame the president for killing the agency. Others 13, 1936. and formed the Roff Pio- neer club. It-meets once each year and is a 'red letter day' in the lives of most of the women. At each meeting of the club, members often see acquaintances whom they have not seen in 15 or 20 years and never is there a dull minute during the all day get togethers. The affair this year was the eleventh annual one. More th.m 30 persons were in nllcndnncc from this section of the stute. One woman from Rocky who formerly WHS n resident nt Roff, was a guest nl the meeting this year. Visit, Talk Over Old Times The women spent the morning hours visiting, looking over old pictures and recalling old times. At noon, a covered dish luncheon was served. In addition to the large number attending the affair of Jum; 12, there was a number of telegrams Bullard Funeral This Afternoon Funeral services for Jim Bui- manufacturers of c o 11 o n and woolen textiles. .The ceiling would have to include the cost of the raw cotton or wool (not ]ow- ,er than a weighted ave- rage of .mill, conversion costs, and "a reasonable profit" base on 1939-41 earnings., A requirement that price con- trols come off when supply of a r_, VJXi, TViltH Ui Ine five which were approved commodity comes into approxi- spite of Bowies' denunciation mate balance with demand. were: Transfer to the secretary of ag- A provision declaring that ceil- j riculture of authority to say what ings for producers, manufactu- rers and processors must reflect their prices during the base pe- riod Oct. 2-15, 1941, plus the ave- rage increase in- unit cost farm commodities may be kept under price control. No ceilings could be maintained unless" he certified the commodity was in short supply. had The. Frederick News- identified the man in the spectacles as 'President Truman. The News said the story came out at -the annual picnic of the Alfalfa club, a Washington social organization, on the Frederick' county estate of Joseph H. Hi'mes, former Ohio' congressman, which was attended by the 'president: The paper reported that the presidential car took the young marine on to his home in Middle- town. eight miles west of here. No one seemed to know his at 3 o'clock from the First Baptist church, burial in Memorial Park. Bullard was fatally injured last week while standing near a feed mill, a flywheel going to pieces and a fragment striking him in the forehead. OKLAHOMA CITY, June William L. Stidger of the Boston University School of Theology and Bishop W. Angie Smith of the Oklahoma-New Mexico Diocese will headline the Oklahoma Methodist Pastors' school which opens at Oklahoma City university Monday. The school runs through Friday. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. t Treeless Iceland plans large- scale planting of spruces from Alaska, but you could best go to Sinnett-Meaders for auto repair. t' 6-23-lt Many of the women could re- member when the railroad went through Roff in 1900. 'Mrs. Iva Zorn was quick to say that her husband rode the first train into Roff. At Roff By 1905 resort town on the Caspian Sea 40 Sf miles east of Azerbaijan and had who could not attend. refused to permit American-pilot- ed planes to land there. For that reason, the official said, a scheduled flight to Pahlevi yesterday by an Iranian airways plane was cancelled. Iranian air- ways is a newly organized sub- sidary of the American Airline, Trans World Airlines. This was disclosed two days af- ter an official of the Iranian state railways had stated that Russia was still in control of Azerbaijan's railways. An Iranian mission sent into Azerbaijan to take over control of the railways from the Russians has been ordered to re- There is no member of the club who moved to Roff later than "pass the buck" back lo congress. Nearly all of the legislators agreed, however, that regardless of what happens it will have a potent effect- on the political fu- ture of the president and his ad- ministration. Draft Issue Still Hot The draft issue is still a hot one, although most leaders expect passage of the compromise legis- lation finally approved this week by This version continues n select- ive service until March 31, 1947, nnd permits drafting of men from to -14 years old, inclusive, The buck-fire on the draft legislation comes from two sources. Men still in service and their families are complaining the measure isn't strong enough to help them get out as soon as they hoped. On the other hand, youths of 19 and ihpir families are com- plaining that the bill will blast their hopes for obtaining an edu- cation before entering Kcrvice. STEWART SAYS CLUB TO ADVERTISE OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA CITY, June 22__ IT. Stewart, Okla- homa City, today wns elected chairman of the board of direct- ors of the Oklahoma club. He announced the club was preparing to conduct a campaign to attract more tourists to the state. Stewart said the group 1905 and one woman was there to prepare and distribute as early as 1885. This year for the first ....._ since the club was formed, men attended the affair. They were E. P. Downing, O. S. Grimmett and R. F. Crumley. The 1947 meeting of the or- ganization will be held' in the home of Mrs. Arnie Harbert, 216 South Mississippi. It was the custom of the club to meet one year at Roff and the next year in Ada, but because there are more members living in Ada than any other place it will probably be held' here for the coming years. New Yorker Denied Bond in O.C. Court OKLAHOMA CITY, June 22, Peter Samet, New York City, who was'wounded in a gun battle with two Oklahoma City detectives June 3, pleaded innocent upon arraignment today on charges of armed robbery and assault with intent to kill. District Judge A. P. Van Mei- er denied bond on the charge of robbing the Warner theater. A bond was set on the assault charge. Samet will go on trial during tho next jury term of court; in September. Samet and Detective George Leech were both hospitalized fol- lowing the gun battle in down- town Oklahoma City. Officers had stopped to question Samut in connection with the theater hold- up. pamphlets describing enlertain- time nlc'il "lid recreational facilities, scenic nnd historic spots in Okla- homa. Such publications would be dis- tributed through various state agencies, filling stations, hotels and tourist camps. TH' PESSIMIST Bok BUnkl. Anyway, after th' Louts- Conn affair th' other night, we're inclined t' think that Wayne King lost 'is title as th' "waltz king'." Mrs. Onlher Harp, who turned in 'or milk bottles t' th' grocery store yisterday, had enough money t' pay last month's bill an' make a down payment on a pound o' but- ter.   

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