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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 17, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 17, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             One thing Hidelco Tojo never locked is nerve-his latest stunt is H> openly chorge Britain and the United States with combining on policies that forced Japs to fight, blaming them for wor. Nrt May Paid ClrcuUllon 8271 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 54 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1046 Prices Up On Butter And Some Cheese Rise in Living Costs Called Alarming by Some Authori- ties After Steady Increase WASHINGTON, June 17, (SH- OP A today ordered retail price increases of 11 cents a pound for butter and six cents a pound for cheddar cheese. The agency also raised manu- facturers' prices, effective im- mediately. The retail incrciiscs KO into effort upon each retail- er's first purchase from his sup- plier lit the higher prices. These price boosts, authorized earlier by Stabilization Director Chester Bowles, followed an as- sertion bv top government economist that living costs art: climbing at an "alarming" rain. OPA also announced a retail increase of one cent for a ounce can of evaporated milk. More Regulations On Milk In carrying out other indus- iructions of of Bowles designed to increase butter production OPA also take these actions, et Icctive immediately: 1. Established for the first time price ceilings on milk bough from milk producers by dairj products manufacturers and by industrial and commercial users 2. Brought under price control for the first time all bulk sales or commercially-separated cream and sales of farm separatee cream sold by any seller othei than a farmer. Sales by a cream station to a butter manufacturer are exempt. Milk Price Already Up Higher prices for butter and cheese follow by 10 days an OPA order raising the cost of milk a penny a quart. Bowles has es- timated that these dairy product price hikes will cost housewives at least a year. He said the increases were prompted by higher grain costs and "apparently congressional de- to slash food sub- in manufacturers' Tojo Charges War Forced Says Coalition of U. S., Britain "Chased Jap Em- pire" Into Conflict termination sidies." Increases ceiling announced today amount 1o 10 cents a pound for butter, five cents for cheese and 35 cents a .case for evaporated milk. Along with these price hikes, OPA plans to boost the cost of soft coal by about 40 cents a ton this week. This will result from higher wages granted to John L. Lewis's United Mine Workers, as an impending increase TOKYO, June 17, Tojo asserted today a coalition of the United Stales and Great Bri- tain "chased the Japanese empire into a conflict which declared war on civilization and they should take responsibility for de- stroying civilization." Striking back at the internat- ional war crimes prosecutor's Castigation of himself and 27 other_ defendants, the Japanese war-lime premier gave the As- sociated Press, through Defense Attorney Ichiro Kiyose, this ex- clusive statement. Says Can't Prove Charge In the statement, entitled "im- pressions received from a state- ment of the To.io contended the prosecution could not prove its charges that the lefondnnts conspired to dominate he world. In his first detailed summation of his ideas of the causes of the Pacific war, Tojo listed: "1. The pressure of the Anglo- American coalition against the empire after the first great Euro- pean war. "2. The suppression of the (Japanese) empire's trade devel- opment by the objection of a cer- tain big power against the East Asiatic immigration, adoption of a high tariff policy, and forma- tion of an economic bloc. (Ob- viously, a reference ,to the Unit- ed States.) Racial Discrimination "3. Racial discrimination. "4. Economic blockading of the empire immediately before the i A i war of greater East Asia through A drive lo Iajse money to spon- 4U_ niiyusu nmr o Mtr FIVE CENTS THE COPY New Contract Signed, Shipping Will Move Again Trieste Tssue May Be Key To Success Of Ministers Parley Chances Improving British Plan For India to Be Taken This huge stockpile of oil consigned to the war-ravaged city of Manila was part of thousands oC tons u d .San Francisco's waterfront. This cargo was not loaded due to the expected strike by 1hc Maritime Union. However, the contract was signed just before the deadline and this carco is to begin-.to move out to the Pacific upon ratification of the Washington (INJI.A Labor Tension Fades Rapidly Maritime Settlement May Block Any Strike Control Bill This Session This Is Anti Fly Week Here Citywide Cleanup Being Launched to Reduce Dan- ger of Polio Spread threat. "5. Adoption sor and pay for a fly eradication campaign in Ada was started Monday morning when 'Boy Scouts distributed handbills tell- ing the people how the program is to be conducted. Members of P-TA organizations started a house to house campaign to.get the necessary funds. Mayor Luke B. Dodds says it will be one of the most exten- Ihe joint (Anglo American) might and mililary and economic of a policy to cause China lo conlinue resis- lance and to cause Japan and China lo fight each other. "6. Presentation of impossible proposals to the empire at the last stage of Japanese-American ncgotialions (probably just be- fore Ihe Pearl Harbor atlack in Tojo in his recapitulalion plac-1 ed the origin of Ihe Pacific war I the number many years before the date set -ls -to reduce likehh by the prosecution, which in gen- sral begins its. case with the pre- ludes to the Manchurian incident in 1931. Tojo'.s mention of racial dis- crimination and immigration quotas refers to the bitter con- troversy over the immigration act State Road Toll to 222 Five Killed on Oklahoma Highways Over Weekend, By Tlie Associated Press Five persons were killed in traffic accidents in Oklahoma over the weekend, raising the total number of dead in auto mis- haps for the year to 222. The dead, ail injured fatally in Here's More On Boundaries Description of Territory Being Taken Into City Outlined More Closely The city commissioners have begun a campaign of enlarging the incorporated limits of Ada Saturday and Sunday crashes: and have plans laid for more ad- Barney While, 22, a farmer of ditions as the ordinances are pre- near Chapel, killed when struck by an automobile near Pryor. George Reiley, 70, struck by an automobile as he crossed a street near his home in Alva. John Bill Roach, 26, Stilwell, who died of injuries received p----- VJ. sive clean-up campaigns ever: when a car in which he was rid- ?n Ada and he is con-1 ing struck a pig, careened oft the that the drive will do- j highway and hit a cow, and then of 1924. Asserting that these causes of perhaps SI a ton for anthracite. Supar To Go Up The price of sugar also is scneduled to go up a fifth of a cent a pound shortly, possibly this week, to offset a pay raise for refinery workers. And housewives will pay percent more for cooking utensils made of sheet aluminum. The higher prices is effective immedi- ately on new shipments by manu- facturers. The accelerated pace of price .'increases during the last few there have been 53 since June prompted the comment by a top government economist that the cost of living climb is alarming. Cause For Worry The economist, who withheld use of his name, said that lately prices have been moving up at tne rate of about one percent a month, and that this "is some- thing to worry about." "That's 12 percent or better a he added, "as compared with a rise of six to seven percent over the last three years." Bowles and OPA Administrator Paul Porter have pointed to the latter increase as evidence that prices are well in hand. Both have acknowledged that the in- crease pace has quickened recent- ly. but they have asserted that many of the reasons for this no longer exist. The transition from war to peace made more price hikes inevitable, Bowles has stated. He also has said that given "ef- cont1'01 legislation, OPA probably can hold the value of the dollar at about what it is at present. Bowles and Porter have em- phasized that from the spring of 3_943, when the hold-the-line or- aer was issued, to last April 15 living costs had risen only 4 6 percent. They predict an addi- tional climb of 2.1 percent up to July 1. "VERY SHEER" CEILING WASHINGTON, June iff) OPA today fixed a retail ceil- ing price of SI. 70 a pair for very forced Japan into a war of self oC _____ likelihood of nolio here this summer. Mayor Luke B. Dodds will speak over KADA Tuesday morning at o'clock in ex- planation of "why the program is being undertaken here and how it will function. Business firms are- not being asked to contribute to the cam- paign, but the mayor said that donations will be accepted. Don- defense "lo guarantee its own ex- i b? made to city Tojo declared lhal "this- Ray Martln. whose office 1 _ 1-1 w u 10 ,_ ,_ 1-. ..1 1 idea would not be cast away as the cries of a defeated nation." Tojo also asserted it "is not clear how it was possible for the numerous defendants, whose, ages ;irc vastly apart, to carry out a joint conspiracy" as the prosecution charges. Mercurylased Up Here Sunday But Alva Had 107 Top Sunday wasn't as one Saturday in Ada, ac- cording to W. E. Pitt, who has charge of the government ther- mometer. The high for the day was 95 degrees, a bit of breeze and an occasional interference by a few fleecy clouds easing the effect of the sun's rays at times during the afternoon. The night followed with a low of 73 degrees. According to the Associaled Press, the highest state temper- ature reading of the at recorded in Okla- homa Sunday. The mercury soared, past the century mark in several other cities in the state and more hot weather was predicted for Mon- day. is in Convention hall. It has been estimated that 000 will be required to conduct the campaign; there will not be a place in the city missed by the clean-up, The mayor said Monday morn- ing that it is stiil his plan to have alleys cleaned by Thursday when trucks will collect ail trash that has been raked into piles. The actual spraying will start Thursday, June 27, at which time garbage cans should be clean and emply. overturned near Stilwell. Jack L. Prewitt, 30, Temple, Okla., home on furlough, suffered fatal injuries when a car pared ready for adoption. Dominant Hindu Party And Moslem League Swinging Toward Acceptance Now IJy PAUL MASON NEW DELHI, Juno 17, Chances increased today that.lhi> dominanlly Hindu congress parlv and the Moslem league would ac- cept the British cabinet plan foi an interim government to rule the teeming subcontinent in the transitory period before inde- pendence. Field Marshal Lord Wavell, the viceroy, proposed that five congress representatives, fivu Moslem leaguers and four rep- resentatives of smaller segments of India's mass of per- sons for the interim governmenl lo slnrl functioning June 26. (Eandhi "Unhappy" Mohandas K. Gandhi, spiritual leader of the congress, was rep-, resented as "personally very said 1 unhappy" but the pro-congress i and, hls associates _ pro-congress Hindustan Times said "there is every reason for giving favorably consideration" to' Wavell's an- nouncement. Dawn, official newspaper of the Moslem league, expressed the view that the British cabinet mis- sion had "pulled a fast one" anri asked "what guarantee is there even now that this 'final' decis- ion xxxx will remain Po- litical writers interpreted this f fc-w v> j i i.i_ i. .3 jJii'dpicbKU Ltiia Last week the commission by widely as indicating the lengue ordinance agreed to take into the I would accept the proposed cab- city an area lying south of Kings inet, barring further changes (Tin KI i n rf '3 Q A Fnni- f XT____________ i P Road beginning 330 feet west of the west end of the street, run- ning south 450 feet, east to the west line of the Whitaker proper- ty, then dropping down a total distance from King's Road of 660 feet, then east to an extension of Stockton Avenue. Fro m that point the line goes south 660'feet more, the east 2640 feet to the he was riding collided with a east side of' Valley View sub- pickup truck and overturned division. From that point the near Duncan, Loy Edward Titswor.th, 50, Ok- lahoma City, was killed in a two- car collision on the outskirts of Oklahoma City. 'A five-year-old girl, Karen Sue Henry, was crushed to death be- neath the wheels of the family car on the farm of her father, Clarence Henry, 15 miles south- line runs north 660 feet, east 510 feet, then north 660 feet, then west 810 feet to South Broadway. Newspapers usually less than moderate on partisan issues gen- erally made favorable comments. Clarification Asked By CLAIR JOHNSON WASHINGTON, June 17, Congressional friends of orRnnb.- ed Jnbor predicted todny thnt set- tlement of the threnlo'ned mari- time strike has blocked enact- ment of any "drastic legislation" this year. While some lawmakers slill lalked of pushing through a modi- fied version of President Tru- man's emergency strike .control bill, the administration itself wa.s obviously relieved over tile fresh turn in industrial relations. In comment typical of those who usually espouse union view- points on Capitol Hill, Rep. Bie- miller (D-Wis.) told a reporter: "seUlfimenl of the maritime dis- pute takes away the ammunition of those trying to take away labor's rights with drastic legis- lation." Biqmiller said he believes he now can pre- vent passage ,of the emergency bill asked by Mr. Truman. This measure, which would re- quire union leaders to take af- firmative action toward ordering their men back to work in gov- ernment-seized industries, has passed the house and senate in- varying forms. lie is before the house rules committee now awai- ting further action. Biemiller also contended that the long-range Case labor dis- putes bill vetoed by Mr. Truman last week is "dead." The house upheld the veto by a five-vote margin, and although the measure's supporters first planned an attempt to revive it, American Attitude Made Plain, Russia Is Yet to Speak Moscow, However, Implies U. S. and Britain Would Have to Brook Deadlock By LOUIS NKVIN PAH1S. Juno The Bio Four foreign nilnittli'nt resumed today the task of writing an lUil- ian pence treaty, find .'in American source said UK; success or failure of the confrronci; might woll hinge on the Russian altitude to- ward Trieste. A close of U. S. Sec- relary of Stale .lames F. Byrnes said the hoad of the Amuricnn delegation considered Trieste a "question of principle" and "the secretary never compromises with questions of prinriple." At Broadway .the line runs north j state. Mahtab's name was not about 200 feet and then west 1320 submitted by the congress and President Maularia Azad of the! lhe-y announced Saturday they congress visited Sir Stafford dropping the fight temper Cripps, one of three British cab- inet members on the indepen- dence mission. He was reported to have asked clarification on certain points believed concerned with the distribution of the key portfolios in the proposed new regime, including the name of Premier H. K. Mahtab of feet. This takes in about all of '.he homes on both sides o[ King's Road, including all of Horn's- Heights. Also included in the the parly's working committee said they were not agreeable to removing him from the provinci- al sphere. Instructions to the provincial west of Pin-roll Thp rfonth wi, "lou in illuminances IIISLLuuuons 10 me provincial JUSM .wHh elec- not included in tl-n Vlnlr "oll it flvmDcnod on nvatP m-ODerlv llJPPcnect on puvale 1 Midwesl Swelters, Break in Heaf Due By The Associated Press The midwest was in for anoth- er sweltering day today, but a break in the season's first intense heat was in sight. Government forecasters said cooling winds from Canada pro- bably would bring relief to the upper midwest tonight. Con- trasted with a high of 95 expect- ed in Chicago today, a maximum of 75 was forecast for Tuesday. Although-90 degree heat was recorded Sunday as far north as southern Minnesota and as.-far east as Indianapolis, the south'- Food Drive to End Tuesday, Canning Goes on Wednesday The Emergency Food Collec- tion Drive whcih began June 10 in Ada, closes tomorrow (Tues- day) night at midnight. Food will then be packed and shipped for the. UNRRA, free of freight char- southeast of Valley View lions of delegates to Ihe consli- ges. County Home Demonstration clubs, who have been canning surplus foods from their farms and gardens, report a 'total of 250 No. 2 size cans today. The can- ning kitchen will be opened Wed- nesday. Members of the Jesse Homo Demonstration club today brought in several bushels of carrots, beans and squash and are canning them. Members of the club are Mrs. Ed Harlin, Mrs. B. B. Ryan, Mrs. A. M. Pharr, Mrs. Myrtle Jackson and Mrs. Homer Steven- east Hospital. In addition the new lines fjoes east from the Country Club corner H half mile along the south side of Highway 12, "then south 660 feet, west GOO feet, then south 1880 feet, then west 1320 feet, then north 1320 feet, then north 1320 more, or to the north boundary of Hillsdale Estates.. This includes Ihe west 40 acres of Hillsdale in addition to Ihe other properly included in the boundaries. The commission is now plan- ning to take in several other areas, including the property of Earl Turley on the north side of West King's Road. The country club acreage will probably be brought in as well as Valley View tuenl, assembly appeared to have impressed the congress with the determination of the cabinet mis- sion lo waste no time in imple- menting the independence propo- sal. If the new governmenl indeed is installed on June 26, one of its first tests will come the follow- ing day deadline for a nation- wide railroad strike. arily. But they were quick lo take is- sue today with Biemiller's views concerning the emergency bill. They said it probably will bo sent to the White House in the form passed by the senate. This version omitted authority to draft strikers in essential industries as Mr. Truman proposed and the house accepted. Lawmakers declared that the public still wants the Case bill and that the only reason they are delaying their bailie for it is that, they do not have the strength right now to pass it over another veto. This requires a two-thirds majority in both houses. U. S. Won't Thus, since tin; United Slates apparently will not budge from the stand thai Trieste must re- main Italian, diplomatic observ- ers anxiously awaited indications as to whether Russia would be willing lo compromise on her de- mands that the Adriatic port be ceded to Yugoslavia. A wave of optimism swept over the conference Saturday after Russia, in a surprise conciliatory- gesture, agreed to the discussion of the Austrian problem. Some observers even went so far as to interpret this as .softening in the Soviet policy. Moscow Off Much of this optimism was dis- pelled, however, when the Mos- cow press and radio yesterday launched a new offensive against what they termed western "reac- tionaries and enemies of peace." The Spviet news agency Tass implied in a Paris dispatch thnt- Britain and the United States, rn- ther than Russia, would have to break the deadlock which forced the adjournment of the last con- ference. "Wide circles of the interna- tional public are expecting from the delegates of both these coun- tries constructive steps toward the solution of disputed prob- the agency said. The deputy foreign ministers, meanwhile, buckled down to job of writing a priority list of disputed points of the Italian, treaty for submission lo their chiefs. Fitlslown Man Is Jackson Thinks His j Thrown from Horse Job at Nuernberg To Be Finished Soon Britain May Block Anil-Franco Move NEW June UL i. in weJi. v ujicy v JU w mi -i -i j v Hospital and possibly one or two The possibility of Great Britain r blocking action on a sub-com- mittee report on Franco Spain other residential dislricls. It is possible lhat some re-ad- justments will have to be made in some of these lines, the com- mission poinls out, taut no great changes if any are anticipated. most from the extreme temper- atures. No moisture was reported any- i Ariz., had the high oi1 Mhp 1 n n A i----3 sheer nylon hosier} market soon. due on the _. compares with a ceiling for standard nylons and 51.DO for a popular betler grade__ available at" the those long lines. front end of Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Classified Ads. iWEATHER: OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy in the east and thunder showers and cooler in northwest tonight; Tuesday partly cloudy and continued warm in the south- east: thunder showers and cooler in west and north except partly clouay in the Panhandle. where in the state and none was in prospect for A-P re- ports the federal weather bureau as forecasting. MORE VETS FOUND JOBS IN APRIL, SAYS USES WASHINGTON, June veterans found jobs in April and May than were dis- charged from the armed forces, the United Stales employment service said today, asserting the peak of veteran unemployment has passed. Robert C. Goodwin, USES di- rector, said with only about 000 veterans now returning monthly to civilian life, there "is every reason to believe the situa- tion looks good from here on out. Goodwin said the May report of the census bureau showed to- tal unemployment of of whom were listed' as vet- erans "unemployed and seeking employment." Another veterans neither were working nor seeking work, were classified as students and as retired or unable to work. i PIE SUPPER THURSDAY NIGHT AT CENTER Center will have a pie supper Thursday night of this week be- ginning al 8 o'clock at the school building. Everyone is invited. The proceeds will go toward pro- viding a singing school. -K- the Xuma, Ariz., had 109; Phillipsburg, Kas., 108; Grand Island, Neb., 107; Alamo- gordo, N. M., Sioux City, la., and Norfolk, Neb., 106, and Council Omaha and Lincoln, lashed' the _. Sunday night, damaging homes, crippling streel- car service in some parts of the Thunderstorms Cleveland area come in today sent food already canned. Several Home Demonstration clubs which had no extra food at this time used their club mon- ey to buy cases of food. The Fitz- hugh club sent in a case of can- ned, milk today and the Stone- wall club has promised to bring in one today. Gen. Gaifey Killed In Plane's (rash FORT KNOX, Ky., June arose today as the United Na- tions security council was called into session p.m. CST) to debate the question. Russia already has flatly op- posed the findings, but eight oth- er nations have agreed to accept them. A British spokesman said Sir Alexander Gadogan has been in- structed by London to seek clari- fications and modifications of the report ir. regard to its legal as- Gen Hugh J. Gaffey Pecls. The spokesman declined and two other army officers were elaborate but expressed hope killed and four service men were injured last night when their plane crashed as it came in for a landing at Godman field here. General Gaff ey, 51-year-old commander of the Second and Fourth -armored divisions in Eu- Mrs. Jessie Morgan, county j during World War Two, has home demonstration agent, an- nounces that the kitchen will be open all dpy Wednesday and that v-ni. in aujiic UcU LS UI Lne 'n I T city, and injuring three persons i lhey wjl1.be ejacl to accept food Hailstones' as big as golf balls canninc between nnw fell at the Wayne county airport as a thunderstorms hit southeast- ern Michigan. KERR'S IDEA WINS OKLAHOMA CITY, June Robert S. Korr said to- day his. request, to the public roads administration for creation canning between now and Wednesday. She also suggested that clubs which could not come in or bring food might follow the example of Fitzhugh and Stone- wall. FORM TRUCE TEAMS IN CHANGCHUN NANKING, T- 0 _f the fund would expedite the muli-million dollar state-federal highway con- struction program now underway, i Under present arrangements it is necessary for. the state to put up the full costs of- all projects, later being reimbursed by fedeval funds. Marshall in Nanking sought to Read the Ada News Want Ads. MOSCOW, June rain fell in the Ukraine today, adding to last week's downpours that broke a drought threatening wheat and other crops. Three billion persons ride York City's subways annually. Eight field learns were activat- ed in Changchun by Brig. Gen. Henry Byroade, senior U. S. of- ficer of the advance section of the'execulive truce headquarters. He flew to Changchun with two communist generals. The .field'teams will visit outposts in an effort to end fighting between Chinese communists and govern- ment forces. Marshall, special U. S. envoy, was seeking a permanent agree- been commanding officer of the armored school at Fort Knox since the war's end. He was nam- ed post commander at Fort Knox only last Tuesday. The others killed in the crash of the B-25 plane were Lt. Allan J. Hoenig, post signal officer, of Trenton, N. J., and Lt. Robert A. Peter, pilot of the plane. The injured were Capt. Gor- I don K. Steele, Fort Knox; Lt. Carl Lirideman. Jr., assistant post signal officer; Sgt. Michael E. De- vine, Godman Field, crew engin- eer on the plane; S Vernon J. Wisotyre, Eauclaire, Wis., a pas- senger on the plane. that Sir Alexander would be able to work out the changes in pre- j staffs. By THOMAS A. REEDV NUERNBERG, Germany, Juno 17, Robert H. Jack- son said today his job as Ameri- can war crimes prosecutor here probably would be over by July 15, and that he would return to the United Stales. The jurist, spearhead of a con- troversy involving S u p re m c Courl Juslice Hugo L. Black, es- timaled Ihe cases of Ihe high nazis would be completed bv mid- July. The attention of the tri- bunal then will be devoted to prosecution of such organizations as the SS, the gestapo and Ihe Hitler youth organization. Jackson emphasized lo a re- porter that he was not resigning as war -crimes prosecutor, point- ing out that he argued the case< against the organizations in the early part of the Nuernberg trials. Groundwork for the act- ual Irial of Ihe organizations is being prepared by a five man commission with separate legal Tom Stiffen Broken Ankle Sunday Tom Korriss, 22, of Killstown, was thrown from a horse he riding Sunday afternoon and wna taken to Valley View hospital. where ho received treatment for broken leg. Hospital officials reported that Ferriss arrived at the hospital about p. in. Sunday suffering from a badly fractured right ankle. Ferriss is still at the hospital, where his condition is reported satisfactory. delegates. with other He Declined lo comment forth- Andrei A. Gromyko, Soviet del- egate, slated last week that ho would not agree to the report, which recommends that the 51- nation general assembly take ac- tion against the Franco regime, and there was wide speculation whether Gromyko would use the veto, abstain from voting, or ab- stain from voting and contend such action did not constitute a veto. er on the supreme court contro- versy which he touched off a (iiy Police Hake 15 Weekend Arrests City police made 15 arrests over the weekend and collected in fines; traffic violation fines added more than to the amouiH. Nine persons wore arrested for drunkenness and fined S8.75 each; two reckless drivers paid a total of two fighters paid each while two others paid and fines. Police investigated an accident week ago with a statement that I on North Broadway where only Black participaled in a decision property damage was done to the that the security council should call for an immediate break in relations with Ihe Franco govern- ment and not pass the issue to the general assembly. However, in some quarters it was believed that Gromyko might hesitate to mvoke an outright veto on the theory that it was better to have in which his former law partner was a counsel. Jackson said he had read of statements in the senate thai both he and Black should re- sign. He said also he had seen President Truman's assertion that he had asked him to forego a public statement until the matter The Soviet position has been had been discussed with him at The Fort Knox public relations some action taken than none at office said Sgt. Devine was seri- a11- ously injured, the others only j slightly hurt. WASHINGTON, June B. Keenan, chief prose- cutor of Japanese war criminals, said today that Japan's wartime premier Hideki Tojo reportedly sought lo dicker with the United States lo coll off Japan's wa- plans before Pearl Harbor. Tojo reported conditions were that Japan's war assets be un- frozen, quantities of high octane V. f 4.1 1 c I- i t---- UJ. lllfcll UUUCUlt: before the 15-fiay truce be- gasoline to Japan be unlimited tweeji the warring factions ex- j and gasoline shipments to China Dired June 22. KQ be stopped. i "TOO LITTLE, TOO IS i NAVY ATTITUDE ON PLAN WASHINGTON, June merger foes pasted a "too little and loo lale" label on President Truman's revised uni- fication plan today. In general, they took the atti- tude that the concessions the president and' the war depart- ment made to the sea arm- on such points as the marine corps and the joint chiefs of staff were insufficient to overcome previous objections. the White House. "I have nothing to say about Jackson said tersely. Questioned about reports lhat he might run for governor of New York, Jackson sa.id he had no comment. Associates said, however, that Jackson never in- tended lo seek an elective office. Jackson's friends said the jus- tice had said all he intended to say about the conlroversy within the court and that to him, incident was a "closed book." JAP WHEAT CROP SHORT TOKYO, June an's wheat crop will total 000 bushels, or half a normal har- vest, the newspaper Mainichi re-- ported today. Labor is ample for the harvest except in Kokkaido, northernmost island, the paper noted, but lack of fertilizer has curtailed yields. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. two cars involved. One of the drivers was charged with reckless driving. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada Want Adf. TH' Bgr Bob Blanks, If. No wonder a lot o' songs haunt radio listeners, th' way they're murdered. One o' th' best -vays f git fat is t' quit worryin' because you're skinny.   

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