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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 11, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 11, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             you contribufed tin canned food to the emergency drive to aid starving of other nations? Your opportunity hasn't passed and you have through the coming Saturday to get yours in. Net May Paid Circulation 8271 Membt-r: Audit Bureau ot Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 49 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Store of Food Here Mounts as Citizens Give for Starving Campaign Continues Through Saturday for Emergency Aid to World's Needy; Rogers Broadcast Feature Nobody knows yet how many hundreds of tin cans of food have already been collected in the city's part of the na- tionwide Emergency Food Collection for starving peoples, but the accumulation is still rising and will grow much more before the week ends. The "warehouse" room in convention hall has a big stack of food gathered in the Monday citywide collection. Tuesday morning several more citizens came by the police sta- tion with their donations, those that had been missed or hadn't been ready for the Monday collection, and others had called in to ss' they had cans of food ready and no way to bring them they'll be called for. Saturday Camv Fire girls will be at a number of local groceries County Court Disposes Of Set of Cases Six Scheduled for Monday Out of Way Now, Continued Until Wednes- day County court got underway Tuesday morning .with some dis- position being- made on six of the seven cases scheduled to. be heard the first day of the court. Judge Moss Wimbish presided over the court. A charge of pointing a deadly weapon was filed against Free. and the case was for with container- to take additional donations, day of the brief but energetic campaign. Saturday is the last Canning Job Well Started Farmers, Ada People Can Assist Home Demonstration Agent with Project In behalf of the farm people of Pontotoc county, Mrs. Jessie Mor- gan, county home demonstration agent, has set up a canning center in the home demonstration kitch- en at the county agent's office in the courthouse and is in process of canning all surplus food that is taken to the office in connection The show itself will be a big with the Emergency Food Collec- i affair with Roy Rogers, Republic Pictures western movie star, tak- ing the spotlight. He will have other members of his party Dale Evans, Gabby Hayes, Carol Hughes, George Meeker, Lanney the crowds atten- Roy Rogers Program Set Arrangements Made, for Distribution of Tickets For Wednesday Night There will be tickets for persons for the Roy Rogers broadcast to be. made from the East Central State college audi- torium Wednesday night at 8 o'clock, according to Bill Hoover, who has made arrangements for the show. Mrs. Morgan says there should be enough vegetables matured by June 22 to fill tins and that No Canning Wednesday Mrs. Morgan announced early Tuesday afternoon that neither she nor Miss Alexander can be at their office Wednesday, so those planning to bring veg- eiables are asked to wait and bring them in Thursday. farm women are reported to be anxious to contribute food to be canned. Before the aconl's office opened Monday morning, a perk of green beam: mid n suck of carrots taken to the court house to bf canned. Have Needed Equipment Miss MarKiirctt A1 ox and cr, as- sistant home deinon.itnilirm HKeiil, Mrs. furnished the center and equipment neces- sary to can iho vegetables. They art-'also doing the canning, assist- ed by some outside help. The tin cans necessary are be- ir.5 furnished by Ada citizens. Mrs. Morgan said that at this busy time on the farm, some farmers would rather purchase two or three cans of food rather than to take the time to can the food on the farm or assist with the work at the home demonstra- tion agent's office. Those having vegetables to can are requested to use the west door and the first door on the right after entering the court house. Those having cans already filled should take them to the main en- trance of the county agent's of- Pleasant Hill Plans Canning On June 21, Pleasant Hill wo- men will take their vegetables to their regular meeting where they be canned. Many of the wo- men are anxious to learn the pro- cess of canning in tin cans. The home demonstration agent said that James O. Braly, chair- man of the Emergency Food Col- lection, wants to collect cans in Ada in addition to the 000 cans expected from the pro- gram started by the home demon- stration agent. tion. There will be no singing on the program. Half Of Tickets To College Half of the tickets will be made available to college students and the other half to the public for the program, arranged by KADA as a public service 'treat.' The college is making its own arrangements for distribution of tickets to st'idents in exchange for canned goods. The tickets arc being distribu- ted in connection with the food emergency drive. (Tickets For Public For the public, distribution will Kin "I 1> o'clock Wednesday morning lit tin: I'iro station. Ench person must pi'esenl at the fire HttiUon canned food equivalent in value to 15 cents, with no limit to the amount above that. Tickets will be given out until they are exhausted. Then some sort of identification ticket or tag will be given those remaining in the line and at G p.m. these will get first chance at any tickets not taken by the college THERE ARE 'TICKETS NOT GIVEN OUT AT THE COLLEGE. For the a child under 10 will be allowed to get two tickets, one for himself or herself and one for a parent, upon presentation of two or tin cans of food. Those holding tickets must be at the auditorium on time for the doors will be closed at p.m. in time to get the audience and stage personnel ready for the broadcast to start promptly at 8 o'clock Wednesday night. torney was Trum'an Harrison, died recently, and for that reason Raliegh has not been no- tified in time to appear Tuesday morning. The case was continu- ed until Wednesday morning. Cases against Robert L. Doyal, Jessie W. Rye and Bill Brun- drette had been disposed of pre- viously. Loyal Kemps Not Here A charge of permitting an un- licensed person to drive a car again Loyal Kemp was continu- ed next terni of court as Kemp is in California and was not ready at this term. A case against Annie Blocker, charged with unlawful possession of intoxicating liquor, was drop- ped because bad search warrant was issued. Other cases scheduled to be heard Wednesday include Sib Hagar, charged with unlawful possession of intoxicating liquor; Henry Harrison Pennington, ad- ministering poisonous drugs; and Jack Nabors, son of Callie Na- bors, charged with discharging firearms iri1' a public place. Jurymen Get Day Off Jurymen reported for duty and were instructed to report-back Wednesday morning. Cleo Black, charged with un- lawful possession of intoxicating liquor, withdrevy his plea of not guilty and entered a plea of guil- ty. He was fined costs and given day jail sentence. The jail sentence started Tues- day morning. President Vetoes Case Labor Bill, House Vote Sustains His Action King of Siam Accidentally Killed Fly Eradication To Be Sought Here In Anti-Polio Drive -K- Says Officer Hit Men in Wounds Oklahoma Woman Drowned in N. Y. Bride of Academy Graduate Loses Life While Canoeing WEST POINT, N. Y., June honeymoon of a West Point graduate, Lt. Elmo E. Cun- ningham of Stratford, Tex., and his bride of five days, came to a tragic end last night when Mrs. Cunningham, the former Corinne Fe Hedrick of Tulsa, Okla., was drowned while canoeing, the army public relations office at Stewart Field reported today. The public relations office said the couple was canoeing on near- by Beaver Dam lake when their canoe collapsed. Mrs. Cunning- ham's body was recovered about three hours later. Lt. Cunningham was graduated Irom the military academy last week and the couple married im- mediately afterwards on June 5. CHICKASHA, June 11, long state conference of Episcopalean young people, cler- gy and other adults has opened on the Oklahoma College for Women campus. By DQN DOANE BAD NAUHEIM, Germany, June former Lich- field guardhouse prisoner testi- fied today that he saw Lt. Leon- ard W. Ennis of Peekskill, N. Y. repeatedly ask prisoners where they had been wounded and then "poke" their wounds with his billy club. This happened "ten or twelve times that I said the wit- ness, Mike Koblmsky of Saginaw, Mich., who still is serving a court martial sentence. Ennis is one of two officers now on trial on char- ges of cruelty to inmates of the U. S. army guardhouse in Lich- field, England, during the last year of the war. In the simultaneous trial of Lt. Granville Cubage of Oklahoma City, lawyers' attempts to ascer- tain Cubage's official responsi- bility over discipline of-prisoners ran into frequent refusal of a witness to answer questions which he said "might tend to incrimin- ate" him. The witness was Capt. Joseph A. Robertson of Akrdn, O., who, although he is awaiting trial on the same charges, told the court martial he had not yet been pro- vided with defense counsel. Robertson said 'Cubage "was performing some of the duties of a prison officer" but he did not know if that was his official title during the time the prosecution charges he was responsible for mistreating prisoners. iWEATHER Bread and Flour Shortages for Year Now Are Predicted By OVID A. MARTIN WASHINGTON, June and flour shortages for at least another year was the forecast handed American house- wives today despite the start, on harvesting another of the nation's bumper wheat crops. The agriculture department re- ported considerable improvement in bread and flour supplies are expected in another month, but hardly to the extent needed to meet all domestic and famine re- lief demands before the 1947 har- vest. The bread scarcity in a num- ber of major cities meanwhile verged on the acute an Associated Press spot survey also disclosed the same held true for meat. Soap, butter and cooking fats ranked next on the list of increasingly hard-to-get items. The outlook in the cities cov- ered seemed to be that these shortages would grow worse be- fore the situation improved. Har- vesting of the new wheat crop promised to ease the bread-flour picture, but complex uncertain- ties ma'de thp prospects dubious for any big improvement in the supply of meats, butter, or fats. In its June crop report issued yesterday, the agriculture depart- ment said the third consecutive- billion-bushel wheat crop and the third largest crop of record was indicated by conditions pre- vailing on June 1. The crop estimate' was put at bushels, or about bushels more than was indicated a month earlier. While about bushels below last year's record harvest, this year's crop stands out as a large one in comparison to the 10-year (1935-44) average of bushels. There still is time for further improvement in production pros- in the more northern producing areas where the crop matures it is hardly possible fov the final out- turn to be large enough to allow consumers all their want. The late King Ananda Mahidol, left, 20-year-old ruler of Siam, whp was found dead of a bullet wound in the Royal Palace in Bangkok, is shown here with his sister, Princess Mahidol, and Prince Phumiphon Adulet, right, 18-year-old Boston-born brother who has been named the new King by the- Siamese legislature. This photo was made while the king and his family were in Washington Stunned by Seeing One Justice Assailing Another GUTHRIE, June 11, than girls from all sections Oklahoma are expected to at- tend the 23rd annual meeting of grand assembly of the order iof rainbow for girls- this week. Oklahoma: Fair and warmer. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada Nows Want Ads. Sunshine, Hotter State's Forecast By The Associated Press The federal weather bureau promised today more bright sun- shine needed by farmers to har- vest the fourth largest wheat cr.op Oklahoma ever has produced. The bright weather follows an official U. S. department of agri- culture forecast from Washing? ton yesterday that Oklahoma would produce bushels Filing Begins For Places on Ada's New City Council Filing started Tuesday morn- ing for places on the new city council which will be at the head of the Ada city government when the revised charter voted recent- ly goes into'effect. By early afternoon four can- didates had Charles F. 2; Joe W..Hensley, Ward 3; Vernon Roberts, Word 4; Luther Hudgcns, councilman at. largo. Spencer is n member of the East Centnil college .faculty, Henslcy is n nn attorney uncl Hudgcns is in tho iiutomobilc tinc.1 nuto'repair busincHS. Other filings lire expected in the firs I'low d.'iys ot the filing period, which ends Saturday, Juno 22. Five councilmen are to be elect- ed, one from each ward and one at large. The primary election in the council race will be July 2 and a run-off election, if required, on July 16, the man elected to take office July 22. The council will select a city manager and will supervise his administration of city affairs. Corrigan Wants To Make Drunks Pay Senate Candidate Is Dry, Doesn't .Seek Prohibition But Higher Liquor Taxes LOS ANGELES, June sandy-haired Douglas Corrigan (remember "Wrong Way is campaigning for the U. S. senate on the prohibition ticket, and the chief'plank in his platform is "soak the drunks with higher taxes." Doug is one prohibitionist who wouldn't prohibit. "Not much'use said the- aviator, who made some kind of history back m July, 1938, when he left Floyd Bennett field, New bstensitoly'Ven route to Los Angeles, and wound up in Dublin, Ireland. He- said he got lost. Although he is a tetotaler him- self, Corrigan said he had' no very pronounced views on pro- hibition and that he ran on that ticket in the primary chiefly be- cause it was the only one on which he could get nominated. He was that party's only candidate for the Office, so, he got the nom- ination, all right. "I'm in favor of higher liquor Corrigan said. "Control of the. liquor- traffic .is one of the chief items of government ex- pense, and the guy who drinks it should foot the bill." "Doug said his interest in politics dates back to his nationwide tri- Jackson's Blunt Attack on Black Brings Feud Inside Court Into Open, May Lead To Overhaul of Supreme Court Procedure By WILLIAM F. ABBOGAST -S WASHINGTON, June unprecedented spectacle of one supreme court justice pub- licly assailing another stunned of- ficial Washington today, but sev- eral lawmakers held it might lead to restoring what they term the "lost dignity" oi.the tribunal. The bombshell which Justice Robert H. Jackson exploded in his blunt .'attack on Justice Hugo Black projected a Jong-smoldeiir ing judicial i'eud out into the open, and these influential law- makers thought this could be u good thing in the long run. Specifically, they snid prlvnte- ly congress may order u complete overhaul of court procedure in nn effort to minimize "blckerinu" on und behind llm bench'. No Pnrullel In Modern At the moment, however, the capit.nl buzzed with more imme- diate speculation over whether Jackson and Black intended to continue on the high bench, des- pite a virtual state of war be- tween them. The situation was without parallel in modern court history. Jackson lashed out at Nuern- berg last night at what he called Black's "bullying" tactics. He de- clared'his colleague had threaten- House Votes Pay For Vet Unused Furlough Time WASHINGTON, June house today passed, 379 to 0, arid sent to--the senate legisla- tion giving pnsl and present en- listed man nnd women pny for furlough time they did not re- ceive while In service. Tho legislation nets, nn n stun- diii'd, two mul ono-hiilf cliiys of furlough time each month and permits Ihc iicuiimiilntlon of not inoi-o than 120   nnii- Ihe hill which noiiKruin voted by big innjorllli'ii, Jli' ,'itrirHni'fl tin1 nri'il of production anil mild "mrlkoN niui lorkoul.'i arc I In- Kivnlivil' hnmil- lo iiltalnliiK vital produc- Major provisions of the Cnao bill included the creation of federal mcdiaUun board, rcHtrlc- tions any strike or lock- out while the- board sought solu- tion of a labor dispute: a prohibi- tion on secondary boycotts; and provision fo'r court suits against employers or labor organization I violating collective bargaining I contracts. Asks For Own Bill The chief executive coupled his veto with a renewed plea for his own emergency strike con- trol plan, for a senate-hous'i study of the whole field of labor relations and for enactment of his IpnK-slulemtited domestic leg- islative program. "The fact that we are faced with an emergency which docs justify the passage' of temporary legislation docs not, in my opin- ion, justify us in the adoption of permanent legislation without the study that such permanent legislation he declared. The message went to a congress torn by controversy between groups for and against tightening controls over labor. The house, which passed the Case bill 230 to than the two thirds majority necessary to override a a quick decision on that question. Failure to override there would kill the bill. But if the house reverses the president by the necessary margin, the veto then would RO to the senate, where again a two-thirds majority would be required. The senate vole on passage whs 49 to 29, less than two-thirds. Today's message went to the (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST I BIT nok Blink., It. Th' trouble about takin1 a cat t' th' country t1 lose it. ydu generally follow it back home. Junior Wheeler says life is really goin' t' be sweet if he ever gits big enough I' wash 'is ma's eais.   

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