Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 10, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 10, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             if y.u ..n without much feeling .f adults in .tarring areas of the million, .1 children foe. i, .n.uch f. prompt Avcrate Net May Paid Circulation 8271 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 48 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JUNE 10, 1946 Mayor Sets Election For July 2 on City Councilmen Choices Candidates Can Now File for Places on Supervisory Board Under Amended Charter, Until 10 Days Before Election Food Pick-Up Is Launched Trucks Bringing in Gifts For Starving Peoples; Drive Continues This Week 'Pick Up Food Day' for the Emergency Food Collection Drive began this morning at o'- clock from the Convention Hall with eight or ten trucks and a- bout 40 Boy Scouts and other volunteer workers to pick up food for starving peo- ple in Europe and Asia. It was reported at the police station, where the food will be stored until it is shipped, that food was coming in by the truck load. Very few Ada families forgot to put food out today. But for those who did forget, or for any other reason could not have it today, there is still time. Food in tin cans may be taken to the police station any day during the week. On Saturday, June 15, Camp Fire Girls will stand at large containers in front of down town grocery stores to receive last minute contributions. Requests have been made daily Mayor Luke B. Dodds today issued a proclamation calling for a special election on Tuesday July 2, for election of members of a city council called for by the revised charter voted recently by the city of Ada. The voting will be done on the same day as that of the general primary election for nominees of major parties in county and state races. Qualified persons can now file their statements of candidacy with the secretary of the county election board, Joe Beck, or with Claude Bobbitt, county clerk, if Mr. Beck is not avdileble. The Proclamation The proclamation follows: Whereas, at a special election on June 4, 1946, the electors of the City of Ada, Oklahoma, rati- fied the Amended Charter of the City of Ada, Oklahoma, proposed by tho Board of Freeholders pur- suant to Ordinance No. 740; Whereas, on June C, 1046, the Governor of the State of Okla- homa approved said Amended Charter, and the provision of said Amended Charter relating to nomination and election of coun- cilmen went into effect at tha FIVE CENTS THE COPY Navy Considers These Bases Vital to Defense Truman Says He'll Send His Message To Congress Tuesday On Case Labor Disputes Bill during the past week, in the newspaper, over the radio, in East Central assemblies, and Sunday from the pulpits for such foods as milk, peanut butler, baby foods, canned fruit, juices and vegetables. Cash donations are also acceptable and may be paid to Ray Martin, city clerk, whose office is in Convention hall. Death Toll Rises To 16 in Blaze At Dubuque Hotel By DWIGHT McCORMACK DUBUQUE. la., June death toll in a tragic fire at the Canfield hotel went to 16 to- day as a three-pronged investiga- tion was started in an effort to determine the cause of the blaze which swept through the 200- room structure shortly after mid- yesterday. Taking leading parts in the in- vestigation were the Atete fire marshal's office, the Dubuque county attorney and the coroner. At the same time, Dr. F. S. Leon- ard, coroner, countermanded a previous decision and said an in- Whereas said Amended Char- ter requires the Mayor of the City of Ada to call a primary el- ection on the fourth Tuesday after the Governor approves the Amended Charter for the nom- ination of candidates for the of- fices of councilmen; Now, therefore, I, Luke B. Dpdds, Mayor of the City of Ada, Oklahoma, hereby call a primary election to be held on Tuesday July 2, 1946, for the nomination of candidates for the offices of councilmen of the City. Said' pri- mary election shall be held in all precincts of the City in the man- ner provided by the said Amend- ed Charter of the City of Ada, and the laws of. the State of Oklahoma insofar as they ralate to and are applicable and not .superseded by the Amended Charter. Qualified per- sons desiring to become candi- dates for the offices of council- men may file statements of can- didacy with the Secretary of the Mnl that runs through' the County Election Board at any farm about one-fourth of a mile time ten days prior to the date of said primary election. In testimony whereof, I. here- unto set .my hand this the sev- enth day of June, 1946. Luke B. Dodds, Mayor, City of Ada. Five To Be Elected There are to be five councilmen elected, one from each of the four On map above arc shown the 15 Pacific bases which the Navy considers vital to America's future defense. In addition, the Navy will have .bases at Adak and Dutch Harbor, Alaska; Attu in the Aleutians; and at Balboa, C. Z. Small Boy Is Drowned Billie Rqy Delozier of Ada Had Gone Fishing Alone Near Harden City Billie Hay DeLozier, eight year old son of Mr. and ,Mrs. Willie T. DeLozier of Ada, was drowned Sunday afternoon Harden City while fishing near the house of his grandfather, C. H. DeLozier, where he was visiting. The youngster ate-lunch at his1 Tandfather's and said that he vas going fishing.' He was warn- :d that he shouldn't go to Birds wards and one at large. Voting on i bridge, the from the house. Young DeLozier left his grand- father's house about 1 p.m. and was found about p.m. by J. C. Ross and Gerald Stewart of Harden City, who had been driv- ing some cattle and were return- two men reported that they were riding across a bridge and saw the boy lying on the bot- tom of the creek. Underneath the Dummy Atom Bomb Dropped First Intricate Pattern Of Aviation for Test Tried Out Near Bikini By ELTON C. FAY ABOARD MT. McKINLEY, NEAR BIKINI, June 9, (Via Navy Radio This atomic bomb test force put into the air for.'the first time today its intricate pattern army. and navy aviation to re- hearse for A-day.- Maj. Gen. William, E. Kepner, commander of the army's atomic test .operations, sent aloft about 75 aircraft of various types from Kwa.jalein, Eniwetok 'and' two carriers. He directed the re- hearsal from this flagship of Vice Arm. William P. Blandy County Court Opens Tuesday Disposition Already Made Of Some if Criminal Charges Listed on Docket A term of county court will get underway Tuesday morning when a jury will be impaneled at 10- o'clock for the four day term of court. County Judge Moss Wimbish will WASHINGTON, June County Attorney -Tom D. Me-.! preparations for a mari- Maritime Strike Hearer as Unions Reject Suggestion Any Settlement Likely To Come at Last Moment; Unions Make Preparations By MAX HALL WASHINGTON, June Augustine B. Kelley of a house labor subcommittee said today he is going ahead with Dlans to work out a congressional solution of the maritime dispute now that other federal mediation attempts appear deadlocked. Kelley, of the subcommittee on labor-management, told a report- er that his group had held off hearings hoping the labor depart- ment could work out a settlement. "We had hoped for a settle- ment by tomorrow but now thnt it looks like there will be noth- ing coming out of the labor de- partment negotiations we feel that we should get busy-right Kelley said. "The deadline for the strike is getting right on us." Open Hearings Tuesday Seven unions affiliated with the ClO-domircated committee for maritime unity (CMU) have set a strike date for midnight Friday in behalf of their demands, prin- cipally for a reduction in the present 56-hour work-week for eamen. Kelley said his committee will open hearings tomorrow with tes- timony from either Joseph Cur- ran, president of the CIO national maritime union, or Harry Bridges, head of the CIO international longshoremen's and warehouse- men's union. They are co-chair- men of CMU. Another witness will be Joseph Selly, president of the CIO American communica- tions association. Keown said that Robert L. Doy- al, charged' with unlawful pos- session of intoxicating liquor, had paid a fine and been given a 30 day jail sentence that was suspended. The county attorney said that Doyal is employed in commander of the atomic task I New Mexico and fo.r that reason the iail sentence was suspended. ing. The quest would be held before a I voters. all candidates will be done by all three-member -jury. Holel Owner's Wife Dies The 16th fatal victim of the fire was Mrs. William Canfield, 73, wife of the hotel owner. Her husband was taken dead from the ruins yesterday. She died in Mer- cy hospital of third degree burns. Three of the dead remained unidentified and 23 persons still v.-ere reported missing by the Red Cross. Fifteen more were in the hospital. While officers held off further search for bodies on orders of deputy State Fire Marshal Zach Cook who said the walls were the Amer- ican Red Cross continued a radio appeal for all persons who were registered at the hotel Saturday r-ight to report to the Red Cross. Fire Chief Perry Kirch said lost of the persons or after the fire --h the 55 year old building early yesterday morning were Dermanent pnpstc iifar't. r. A cx x .V SU13 he believed most of the persons unaccounted f or after the fire oared through the 55 year old permanent guests who registered at the hotel, but had Jen for the weekend. The hotel register listed 123 nsmes, many of which were ille- gible because of water damage. The Red Cross said the missing probably included the three un- identified dead. Kirch said he expected to find few" more bodies in the piles of charred derbis. The search probably will be able to get un- der way again about 10 a. m. central daylight saving time, the fire chief said. The council will then elect a mayor from among its members to provide and to perform certain other functions, and will employ a city manager to head the ad- ministration of the city govern- ment. men found the youngster's fishing pole. One of the men went to a nearby oil well where some men were working and the men got the body out of the creek. Survivors include the parents and three half sisters, Dondrue Wanzell and Stella- Louise De- Lozier. Funeral arrangements will be announced later by the Smith Funeral home. Army Recruiting Fairly Brisk Here Ten Men Sign Up in Week; Recruiters Ready to Ex- plain Advantages to Others Chester C. Martin, in WATCHED MOTHER, DAUGHTER DIE DUBUQUE, la.. June Mrs. Rosemary Miller today told tne tragic story of seeing her mo- tner and five-year old daughter meet death in the Hotel Canfield fire yesterday while she stood helpless on the ground below The two, Mrs. Theresa Smith ana Judith Miller, permanent res- idents of the hotel, died on an up- per floor landing, apparently un- able to move iurther. New Compromise On Draft Law Sought Would Induct 18-Year Olds But for Service in This Country Only WASHINGTON, June of 18-year-olds for service in this country only was proposed today as the basis for _........ Jti compromising the senate-house I charge of the Army recruiting sub-station at'Ada, reports that business is fai.vly good in the way of voluntary enlistment. During the week that the sta- tion has been open, ten men from Ada and two from Allen have joined. Those from Ada were Sid- ney S. Ayres, Don L. Martin, Ar- thur L. Franklin, Billy G. Thom- as, Loren L. Betts, Haskell D. Little, Ruben 'E. Barnett, Amos Carruthers, Harold Blaylock, Jr., and Morris Anderson, Jr., Rupert F. Milner and John R. Gleeson were the two from Allen. Martin urges that anyone inter- ested in joining or anyone' just wanting to know about recruit- ing contact either him or his as- sistant, Lewis F. Ballin- ger; they will be.glad to talk the matter over with 'them. The sub-station is located in room 304 of the Post Office Build- Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. IWEATHER! OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy, scattered showers southeast and south central this afternoon and tonight and southeast Tuesday; continued warm with high tem- peratures, 90-95; north and west. quite windy stalemate over draft extension. The plan was offered by Rep. Sparkman (D.-Ala.) in an effort :o break the deadlock over the louse's repeated refusal to vote for a teen-age draft and the sen- ate's insistence that the teen- agers be inducted to relief men with long service records. Sparkman's plan would pro- hibit the armed forces from send- ing 18-year-olds overseas unless they volunteered but would al- low them to be drafted for serv- ice in the United States. It would not affect the status of 19-year- olds, who now may be sent over- seas if they were inducted prior to last May 15. Prior to last May 15, the serv- ices were permitted to draft teen-agers for service anywhere, but congress, in passing a resolu- tion extending the draft law until June 30, prohibited induction of any teen-agers, regardless of where they were to be used Sparkman, one of the seven house members of the conference committee, told reporters he be- lieved the house would accept the compromise, and there were in- dications that the senate also might take it as a last resort. The conferees hope to reach a final agreement this week and force. Kepner said he was "very gratified" but improvements must be made in the radio communica- tions system before A-day, early in July. (This dispatch 'did r.ot report where the dummy bomb fell.) The dummy drop was schedul- ed for 9 a. m. the bombardier re- ported "bortb away" a. m. 1 minutes, 15 seconds a- head of schedule. Immediately B-29s released parachutes with simulated blast recording instru- ments. Men in this atom fleet didn't see the bomber, which came in too high and turned off too far away. Navy and army officers, how- ever, "saw" the whole operation by radar in the combat intelli- gence center of the Mt. McKin- ing. Committee Okays Snyder Nomination ley. Many Over-Charge Complaints Handled District Office .Disposes Of 487 Reported Violations During May Voluntary adjustments on ad- mitted over-charges by merchants and individuals during the mon- th of May resulted in being paid to the U. S. Treasury and refunded to pur- chasers, acceding to information received by the local price con- trol board. The district OPA office has advised local boards that 487 Jessie W. Rye was charged with drunk driving, but the charge should have been reck- less driving, the attorney explain- ed. He paid a fine'and costs on charges of reckless driving. The county attorney said that Bill Brundrette, charged with un lawful possession of intoxicating liquor, will be fined on each of two counts plus 30 days in jai on each case. The' jail sentence? will run concurrently. Cases that will be heard Tues- day include Loyal Kemp, charg- ed with permitting an unlicensed person to drive a car; Annie Blocker, charged with unlawful possession of intoxicating liquor; Cleo Black, charged with unlaw- ful possession- of intoxicating liquor; Fred Raleigh, charged with pointing a deadly weapon. Three cases are scheduled for each of the three following days. Noble Waives His Prelim on Murder TULSA, Okla., June John Noble, 22, waived prelimin- ary hearing today .and was held for trial on the second murder charge resulting from the blud- geon death of Fred Stahl, 50, a Kansas City salesman. Bobby Lee Cartwright, 39, pleaded guilty to the crime and already'.has started serving a life sentence in the state penitentiary at McAlester. Mrs. Stahl, who came to Tulsa to search for her husband after time strike Friday night roared complaints were handled during his disappearance last May 9, re- WASHINGTON, .the month by the 22' area price price control boards in the dis- trict. Of the 487 reported violations reviewed, 284 of them were found not to be the price regulations, 112 were ad- mitted violations, 61 placed on probationary status and 30 result- ed in refunds to purchasers. Price panel members have authority to negotiate only vio- lations that are recognized and admitted by the seller. Contro- versial cases are handled by the enforcement division of the dis- trict OPA office. GIRL HAD ROMANCE WITH KING LAUSANNE, Switzerland, June close friend of turned for the hearing scheduled today. She wept as Noble and his into high gear today after the CIO National Maritime union turned down a proposal to .give seam i shore leave with pay. This suggestion first was put forward by labor department conciliators as a possible way to break the deadlock over the length of the work-week at sea. The idea was to give one day of shore leave for every 14 days at sea, and keep the present 56- hour hours a day, seven days a week. Operators Accepted Plan Eastern ship operators accept- ed the suggestion' last night and formally offered it as a proposal in a negotiating session which lasted until well after midnight. x But the union, which is de- "rnanding a 44-hour week, reject- ed thp as "imnrarfifnl Report Seems "Too Hot" House Subcommittee Re- port on Russia's Dealings With Neighbors Withheld WASHINGTON, June row in the house foreign af- fairs committee is holding up publication of a report critical of Russia's policies in dealing with her neighbor nations behind "the iron curtain." The report, by a four-member subcommittee which toured Eur- ope last fall, should have been made public last week. But because of sections which condemn Soviet activity in Po- land and the Balkins, plus Iran as well, administration supporters in the committee are urging a change in Innguage before: its re- lease. Some of these members oven said that "undiplomatic referen- ces" to Russia made them favor indefinite suppression of the re- port. Says Public To Get Facts One of the subcommittee mem- bers, Rep. Mundt told a reporter that "apparently an at- tempt is being made to squelch our report." He declined to discuss its de- tails, but added that if the com- mittee blocks publication "we will take it upon ourselves to sec that the public gets the facts." Mundt would say only that the material in the report is "a fac- (Continued oh Page 2, Column 1) Find Siamese King Dead, Brother Is Designated as King Shooting Death of Ananda Called Accidental; Never Cared for Monarchy By ALEX MacDONALD BANGKOK, June 10, Prince Phumiophon Aduldet, 18, was nnmed king of Siam todny while this shocked nation mourn- ed the death of his brother, 20- year-old King Ananda Mnhidol, who was found in the royal pnl- ace yesterday with a bullet wound between the eyes. The new king, who will become the ruler of more than square miles and sub- jects, was unanimously selected by an extraordinary session of the legislature, meeting 12 hours after his brother's death. The Siamese police director general told the legislature that ,i Ananda's death was accidenlial, ed the idea as and Phumiphon Aduldet, the almost then proposed exploration of constant companion of his older Hasn't Said If He Plans to Sign Or Veto Big Measure Close' Associates and Case Bill Supporters Both Art Expecting Veto By CLAIR JOHNSON WASHINGTON, Juno Truman told his con- gressional leaders today he would send a message to congress tomorrow on tho Cuse labor dis- putes bill, but apparently did not say whether he would veto or sign it. Speaker Rayburn (D.-Tex.) told reporters after n 45-rninuUj conference with tho chief execu- tive nt the Whiti; House: "Whether it will ha a veto or mossiigc of approval we don't know." Reporters that sonil- ing a message to oor.KrcsK in con- noction with approval tha bill would bo unusual, Rayburi) replied sometimes done. that it President's Bill Walts Ray burn also disclosed that the Administration leadership will try to get a rule in the house to send the president's own emer- gency strike control proposal to a conference of the two houses this week. Each passed it in different form. "It is just a matter of awaiting action on the Case Rayburn other ways of meeting its de- according to a labor de- partment announcement. Another session was scheduled today at 2 p.m. Thus the nationwide strike planned by the committee for Maritime Unity ''com- posed of seven unions and head- ed by Harry Bridges and Joseph Curran, moved a grim step clos- j .three days ago, was It became more likely that if the walkout is to be avoided at all, the settlement will come at the last moment. Strike Due Friday Night The strike of seamen and dock workers is scheduled at one min- ute after midnight Friday night. If the walkout comes, each sea- port will feel its paralyzing effect when a.m. Saturday rolls around in the time zone where he port is located. Thus the trike will occur four hours earlier in New York than in San "rancisco. Curran's National Maritime Jnion served stern notice yester- ay in a "strike policy" statement hat unless ship operators offer shorter work week, the strike brother, was born in Boston, Mass., while his father, the late Prince Mahidol of Songkhla, was studying at Harvard. Phumphon Aduldet and Ananda attended school together in Switzerland. A three-member council of re- gency was named by the legisla- ture to advise the new monarch. Pridi Phanomyong, reappointed expected to be retained in that post. Was Reluctant Monarch Only sketchy details were dis- closed on the shooting of King Asked by reporters earlier whether the Cuse bill was brought up in the discussion with Mr. Truman, Senator Hill Ala.) replied: "No sir, no sir, no sir." Asked what they did talk about, Hill replied, "lots of things." Hill attended in place of Sen- ator Barkley (Ky.) the Demo- cratic leader. Rayburn, who waited to talle with reporters, said the president did not say what action he con- templatod on the Case bill, and added, "he was not asked." Veto Expected Close associates of President Truman said today they expect him to send n message to Tuesday vetoing the Case labor disputes bill. White House intimates of chief executive voiced this opin- ion privately, following two clays of intensive study of the measure by the president and his Similar views were expressed bv administration spokesmen oh Capitol Hill. None of these officials, ever would say positively that Mr. Truman has decided against approving the legislation, which sets up new federal mediation machinery and carries several sweeping regulations of union ac- They reported only that they have received no indication the president will take any but veto course. Mr. Truman himself was keep- ng his own counsel, although he nay disclose his decision today 0 congressional Democratic coders nt a regular weekly eon- ference with them. However, even if he does this. 1 is expected they will be plcdg- May Override Veto Proponents in <1USC ihcy a veto. and they scheduled an informal Ananda, a bespectacled, different s rategy on youth often described as a re- what Ictfon to takt J d' llfKsx 1-. n. J l-i _ nounce the waiver. uncl submit it to the senate and the i y President Truman's house for approval. The teen-age I of John W. Snyder provision of the extension legis- c. ,secretai'.y of the treasury. lation is the main obstacle in the path of agreement. SEMINOLE, June 'Kiss and Tell" has been present- ed as the first post-war produc- tion of Seminole's Little Theater Guild, Inc. Proceeds from the production will be used for civic improve- ments. mous. Mahidol of Siam was reported to have been in love, said today the friendship "was not a serious af- fair" and that Marilene "knew it could not last." Marilene, daughter of a Lau- sanne clergyman, is black' haired. She frequently appeared with other male escorts during her p'iendship'with the late-king. She and young Ananda studied law at the same university and frequently were seeri driving to I classes together. Snyder succeeds Fred M. Viri- son, who has been nominated for chief justice of the United States. Chairman George (D-Ga.) said the committee's action, taken nt a closed was unani- East of the Mississippi river, approximately-one out of every three days- is rainy. attorney stood before common can't be avoided pleas.Judge Carter Smith, to an-i Then the 40-man national council of the union, which unan- imously approved the statement here, scattered to their ports and began setting up soup kitchens and taking other strike measures. "We are almost sure to hit the bricks Friday said an of- ficer of the union in Philadelphia, Thomas Carolan. "We are not very liopefulof a settlement." Police 'Front' FIRE EATING AWAY AT APACHE NATIONAL FOREST .SAFFORD, Ariz., June fire which has already burn- ed some 500 acres of the Apache national forest in addition to acres of forest land on the San Carlos Indian reservation was raging uncontrolled today. More than 100 forest service rangers and volunteers are bat- tling the flames which started Friday on the Indian reservation in an isolated and heavily limber- ed region. AH other fires, which during the last week have burned over more than acres in the Co- conino national .forest and hun- dreds of acres in other sections of the state, are under control. MARINE VEHICLES FIRED ON NEAR TSINGTAO AIRPORT TIENTSIN, June nese government dispatches from Tsingtao today said several U. S. marine vehicles were fired on by unknown persons, Sunday night as they returned to Tsingtao air- port luctant monarch, who had be- come extremely popular since his return from Switzerland last December. The young ruler had been ill for two days and arose at 6 a. m. yesterday to take some medicine. Nothing was known of his actions after that time, official sources said, and his body was discover- ed several hours later in the bed- room of the Barompinan palace by a servant. News of the death, which oc- curred on the eve of a projected trip to the United States, was broadcast at 7 p. m. yesterday, and was greeted by wails of grief from a crowd gathered' in front of the publicity building in Bangkok. Mother Prostrate With Grief Great crowds quickly gathered around the palace. The queen mother, Phraralananihsri Sang- wan, an attractive woman in her forties who exerted a strong in- fluence on' the young king, was prostrate with grief. Ananda was a fancier of fire- arms and often practiced firmg in the palace grounds. The queen mother and a royal _. suite of 20 had expected to nc- Ihe Ada police department had company the youthful king on a quiet weekend with only four his trip l.o the United Stales. He arrests being made. Two negroes planne'd to leave here by piano limi-A JTJ_l_j _ T-I i i i were arrested for fighting. Each was fined S8.75 and released. One drunk was picked up and posted a fifteen dollar bond which later was suspended. Another 'negro was picked up for possession of intoxicating liquor. Two locations were raid- ed and approximately ten gallons each one. He paid a fine. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. next Thursday and to spend a- bout a week in Washington and New York before flying to Switz- erland to resume studies inter- rupted last December. CHICKASHA, June K. Triplett, o.C southeast of Nin- nekah, has reported the birth of a hairless calf to a roan cow in his herd. Triplett said the calf was sired by a registered Hereford bull, and otherwise is fully nor- mal. Some told newsmen they have enough strength to override veto. This would require a two- thirds vole. Others expressed said they favored modifying the bill to meet half- way any presidential criticism and then returning it to him as soon as possible. key Republicans re- ported that if Mr. Truman vetoes the Case proposal they would just as soon anything, then blame the president for any strikes or labor troi? which develops. Read the Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST Bob Bliinki, If, Anyway, we ain't noticed any shortage o' stlifted shirts. After shakin' hands with some durn fools you have t' count your fingers t' set U they're all   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication