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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 7, 1946 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 7, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             When we can so well afford to give, it would be tragic for local citizens to fail to send in generous amounts of canned food to those of other nations to whom so little can mean life or death. Average Net May Paid Circulation 8271 Membi-r: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 46 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Many Visitors Are Guests of Ranchers In Hereford Heaven Two-Day Trip Taking Hundreds of 'Tourists' Through Famed Area to See Ranches, Pastures, Herds of Region A large number of visiting cattlemen arrived in Ada Thursday night to be ready to start the first annual Hereford Heaven tour, which began at 8 a. m. at McMakin's Lazy K. ranch near Marietta. C oi C'ers Know More of Europe's Slarvafion Diet Menu Scarce on Calories; County Preparing for Do- nation, Canning Drive After eating a scant 286 calor- ies' worth of food, each member of the Ada Chamber of Commerce heard an appeal Thursday noon for cooperation in the collection of money and tin cans of food lor tho Emergency Food Collection Drive to feed starved Europeans. James O. Braly, drive chair- man, appealed for the canned foods. Organization officers also I inK L ranch near Davis where Many persons spent Thursday night in Ada, but were ready to leave before 6 a. m. as some 85 miles had to be covered before they started making the tour. A few were up and around at 5 a. m. and left a short time later. Al Darlow, who is secretary- treasurer of the Hereford Heaven Association, was in charge of necessary sound equipment. At each ranch visited, the owner or someothcr qualified person re- ports on that particular ranch, its herd, herd sire and other infor- mation that will be of interest to visitors. Tulsa Well Represented A large delegation from Tulsa and the northern part of the stale started arriving Thursday after- noon and were still arriving Fri- day morning as the tour pro- gressed. Most of those who.planned to attend the Friday part of the tout- met the tour at Bill Likin's Fly- present on the rostrum were Mrs. Susan Davison. Mrs. L. E. Ten- nis, and Mrs. Preston O'Neal. Notice To Scouts All scouts of all troops are urged to be at the Convention Hall Monday morning at a. m. to help with the collec- tion of the food stuff to be sent to the starving peoples of the world. Homer Pcay, Chairman of the Service Committee will be in charge of the Scouts. Miss Beverly Byrne, represent- ing Camp Fiie Girls, made a spe- cial appearance in behalf of the food campaign, and affirmed that Ada's youth is sympathetic with helping avert mass starvation. She is to be heard on a "novel radio program" Friday night over KADA. The C. of C. luncheon colary the "av- erage" daily diet of a starved Eu- ropean, Braly that's for all three mpals instead of just one. Mrs. Jessie Morgan will direct an effort to can, in tin cans, quarts of Pontotoc county-grown vegetables. That depends on both the cans and the vegetables. Gar- dens will have mature peas, beans and beets by next week. The cans, it appears, will be on hand. Farmers are requested to bring them to the county agent's office at the court house. The "Pick Up Food Day" is next Monday, but Braly emphasized that canned food can be donated after that. Take it to the police station, or call the police station and the food will be picked up at your residence. Donations of money should be ir.ade to Ray Martin, finance chairman of '.he Emergency Food Collection Drive, at Convention Hall. Better Pay Those Traffic Fines Now Or Will Coir Holders Double, Warns Mayor Dodds The police department advised today that there are a large num- ber of traffic fL.es that have not been paid. If these fines are not accounted for within a certain length of time the department will send for the violators and it will cost them double. The News will publish a list of un- paid fines if it is necessary, Mayor Dodds says. Other than the traffic tickets, the police made1 four arrests yes- terday, all of the violaters plead- ed guilty and paid their fines. One was for disturbance, one for drunk driving and two for fight- ing. Jim Lewis' car was stolen from in front of his home sometime last night, nr.d local police have sounded an alarm to be on the lookout for it. It is a green 1936 Lincoln Zephyr sedan and the license number is 17-2500. one of those famous Hereford Heaven barbecues was served. Tonight the Sulphur Chamber of Commerce is host to the tour with special entertainment for the Hereford Heaven hosts and their many guests. At Saturday morning, the tour starts at the Lester Blair ranch that is located eight miles west of Ada on Highway 19. The tour then progresses to the L. P. Carpenter ranch, six and a half miles .east of Ada on High- way 3 and one-half mile north- west of the highway. Saturday Lunch at Buxtons At noon Saturday, the tour will be at C. C. Buxton's Horse Shoe ranch for lunch. The ranch is located 22 miles southwest of Ada on highway 12 and four miles east of Hickory. W. E. Harvey will be the host of the tour at p. m. Saturday at his ranch west of Ada. The last ranch that will be visited as a scheduled feature of the tour will be., the Lazy D, Ranch that is located southwest of Ada. The public is invited to attend any part of the tour. Harvard Confers Degrees on American Military Men Four of America's great'est warriors received honorary degrees at Harvard university commencement in Cambridge, Mass. Left to right are: Marine Corps Commander General Alexander A. Vander- grift, Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, former Air Forces Chief, General Henry H. Arnold and Army Chief of Staff General Dwight D. U. N. to 'Sell' Self fo World Network of Offices Around Globe to See That Peoples Informed About U. N. By LARRY HAUCK NEW YORK, June -The Capitol Elevator Is Oklahomans' Sooner Lads Usually Go On from Job to College United Nations has launched a far-reaching program to "sell" the U.N. to the world. Preliminary steps looking to- ward a network of branch infor- mation offices in principal cities around the globe have been taken and Benjamin Cohen of Chile, assistant secretary general, is now in Europe surveying ground for establishing a wide series of out- lets. Citips on his calling list include Copenhagen, the Hague, Brussels, Paris and Geneva. A London of- fice already is functioning. Setting up the offices falls in line with a recommendation of the U. N. preparatory commission, which said; "In order to insure that peoples in all parts of the world receive as full information as possible about the United Nations, the de- partment of public information should consider establishment of branch offices at the earliest prac- ticable date." Information, Not Propaganda The commission recommended, however, th.it the department should not engage in "propagan- da" but rather promote an in- formed understanding of the work and purposes of the U.N. In addition to serving as an outlet for U.N. publications, AP Special Washington Service WASHINGTON, June When Robert Ccmby, Chickasha, Okla., high school graduate, be- gan work today as an elevator operator in the capilol, he became the fiftieth Oklahoma youth to obtain the 'job on the same ele- vator since 1930. The job is the patronage of Rep. Johnson Each time Lhere is a vacancy, Johnson se- lects an Oklahoma boy who has made an excellent record in high school and who desires to work his way through a Washington college. Of the 49, Johnson said, only one quit college before he was graduated and he left school to enter the navy. Some have left their elevator job for other em- ployment, but continued their col- lege work. "I will not recommend a boy for the job who will not come here with the idea of attending college during his off j Johnson told a reporter. The elevator is a private one used to carry members of the house and their families and newsmen. Ardmore Bank Sold To Oklahoma Citians OKLAHOMA CITY, June Thu First National j at Ardmore has been pur- chased by three Oklahoma City firanciers, it was learned here today. The purchasers included Loyd W. Jucid, former president of the National Aid Life Insurance com- pany, C. R Anthony and Frank Revised Ada Charter Has Governor's Okay State Officials Approve It, Next Step Is Mayor's Call for Election of Members to-New City Council Ada's revised city charter, ap- proved Tuesday by a more than two-to-one vote here, has been approved by the governor and secretary of state and recorded in the county clerk's office. Guy Thrash, former mayor, and Dr. Charles F. Spencer, chairman of the recent board of freeholders which drafted the revised charter, submitted the charter to the state authorities. Wednesday. The governor's attorney ap- proved the provisions of the doc- ument, it was approved and filed with Frank C. Carter, secretary of state. Next -move in setting up the U.N. I m A A -n. ana r ranK I F A I H F R Scwell, president of the Liberty J t I 11 L. IX J National bank. I tonight and Saturday; not quite so warm Panhandle tonight and in west and north Saturday. Forecast For .Tune 7-11 Missouri. Kansas. Oklahoma end thun- dershowers Nebraska, northeast- ern Kansas and northern Missouri Sunday or Monday or Mondnv and most of district about Wed- nesday: precipitation light most of district except moderate to possible heavy Nebraska: cooler Nebraska Saturday and most of district about Monday: tempera- tures averaging about 10 degrees above normal Missouri, Kansas ancJ Oklahoma to near normal northwestern Nebraska. Russia, Argentina Are Back on Good Diplomatic Terms By JOHN WALLACE BUENOS AIRES, June and Argentina have re- established diplomatic relations, severed in 1917 after the over- throw of the Czarist regime. Announcement of the termina- tion of the 29-yenr-old diplomatic rift between the powers was made here by President Juan D. Peron at his first press confer- ____ ___ ,_________, ence since taking office last Tues- films, exhibits and posters, the day. branches would be charged with Simultaneously, the Moscow ra-' the responsibility of reporting dio, heard m London, said the trends of world opinion about the two governments, "inspired by the high principles of collabor- ation and understanding between peoples, declare have decid- ed to establish from today com- plete diplomatic, consular and trade relations." The Moscow broadcast said am- bassadors would be exchanged "in the very near future." "The negotiations, which have come to such a happy conclusion took'place in the city of Buenos Aires between the plenipotentiary of the government of the U.S.S.R., Shevelev, and his excellency' the president of the Argentine repub- lic, Gen. Juan Domingo Peron, and the minister of foreign affairs and culture, Dr. Juan Atilio Bra- the broadcast added. The official Soviet press said the diplomatic link between the nations would result in extensive trade. A Russian mission which came here ostensibly to promote commerce "WES given diplomatic status at Peron's inauguration. The Soviet government news- pager Izvestia, in preparing the gro'undwork for the move, said the establishment of relations would be in the interest of peace and security, Izyestia added that the move had gained strong head- way since Pevon's election. council-manager form of govern- ment to replace the commission form will be issuance of a pro- clamation by Mayor Luke Dodds setting an election for a five- member council. Filing for places on the council from each ward and one at follow the proclam- ation, closing ten days before July 2. The primary election will be held July 2, run-off vote on July 16 and the new government and its elected officials will be in- augurated the following Monday 22. Will Analyze Opinions The 'commission had this to say of the reporting service: "Branch offices should be equipped to analyze trends of opinion throughout the world about activities of the United Na- tions and extent to which an informed understanding of the work of the U.N. is being secur- A United Nations spokesman said this service probably would include checking news stories, editorials anci the general nrom- inence given U. N. happenings in all media of the various coun- tries. In cases where the infor- mation was found not to be reach- ing newspapers and other media steps would be taken to insure the supply of the material. Cartwright Given Life Sentence For Slaying of Fred Srahl at Tulsa Recently The bank was purchased from E. A. Walker, pi-esident and chairman of the board of the Ardmorr; bank and president of the Tradesman's National Bank hf.-ro. Flection of officers of the Ard- more bank is scheduled this af- ternoon in Ardmore, Judd said. lie placed assets of the bank at and said its capital surplus and undivided profits to'al ANADARKO, Juno Approximately 250 leases on In- dian land in 10 counties have been signed during the past week, Fred R. Nichols, lease clerk at the Ki- owa Indian agency at Anadarko announced. Nichols said the leasing will continue through June. TULSA, Okla., June 7, Bobby Lee Cartwright, 39, was sentenced to life imprisonment today upon a plea of guilty to the murder of Fred S.tahl, 50, a sas City salesman.' District Judge Harry. L. S. Hal- ley sentenced Cartwright upon recommendation of County At- torney Dixie Gilmer, who said in a statement that officers had "worked many long hours and traveled several thousand miles." Cavtwright's surprise plea brought an end to'a case on which county and city 'officers and the FBI have worked continuously since May 9. Stahl's body was found'by fishermen floating in an abandon- ed coal pit. His wallet and an expensive diamond ring were missing, as was his automobile: The burned near Galveston, Tex. Milk, Cream Prices Go Up Here Saturday Under a OPA ruling pri- ces go up here Saturday morning on milk and cream. The increase will be one cent on each quart .of milk, one cent on half-pints of cream and one cent for whipping cream. The increase is passed on to the producers. Lewis Car Stolen Thursday Night Taken from Home Few Hours After Son Died Th'ere James W. Lewis's 1936 green Lincoln Zephyr sedan was stolen from the street in front of his home Thursday night. The keys were left ;n the car, as different members of the family were us- ing it from time to -time. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis's son War- ren died shortly after noon Thurs- day, and friends were coming and going Thursday evening.and early was discovered pight Apparently some one got in the car and drove it away with- out anything out of the way be- ing noticed. Officials were notified early Friday morning. Ice patvol vessels of the U. S. Coast Guard cover a radius of iro'm 5000 to 6000 miles in their search for icebergs. First commercial -plywood was produced in the 1880's by Rus- Tokyo Has Small Number of Persons Living at Large By TOM LAMBERT TOKYO, June 7, ris- ing sun each morning launches Tokyo's furosha (floating wave) of men, women and children of near despair. They are without work, food or homes. In this city of the size of furosha, as estimated by Police Inspector Motoshige Sa- kurai, is about 700 persons, sur- prisingly small. The furosha washes toward Ueno Park, which is comparable roughly with New York's Central Park or San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. Japanese police oc- casionally raid Ueno. In one three-day raid in April they took into custody 4C3 persons, includ- ing 176 children under 13 years of age. There's Hope For Some Most elements of the furosha sleep in parks, railway stations, subway depots and ruined build- ings. They try to work days. These anchorless vagabonds shine shoes, sell newspapers, do manual labor for occupation forces or as- sist black market operators. Some beg. "There is hope for those who said Sakurai. "For those who like their undisciplined life, there is no hope." Furosha is not a menace, al- though these drifting people are blamed for some of Tokyo's in- crease in petty crimes. More Petty Thefts Sakurai said there is a "great change" in the moral fiber of many slow crumbl- ing of their regard for the person- al property and belongings of others. He cited increased purse- snatching and petty thefts. Police graphs report Furosha is made up of war victims, those who lost their possessions in fire raids, 50 percent; demobilized soldiers returned to a nation that, neither receives them kindly nor aids them noticeably, 20 per cent; war orphans, 20 percent; repa- triates 5 per cent, and other un- fortunates, 5 percent. Don't Resent Americans Sakurai said the children, even the orphans, hold no resentment against Americans. "There are no werewolves in Japan." Nor does the Furosha resent Americans who do this sort of thing. j A Yank stood beside a haggard crone who was whining for food, money, clo'thing, anything. He scornfully scanned the crowd which made no move to share their possessions. Reaching into his pockets, he pulled out a handful of cigarettes and an English-Japanese dictionary. "One cigaret to everyone who gives this woman he faltered in twanging, American- accented Japanese. In a few moments, the woman's dirty, ragged kimono front held contributions of food and small denomination currency. The soldier laughed as he paid off. Ship Owners To Make Offer To Workers West Coast Owners Move To Head Off Threatened All-Coast Shipping Strike By STERLING F. GREEN WASHINGTON, June coast ship owners agreed to- day to make an offer to three of th_> maritime unions threatening an all-coast shipping strike June 15. This development coincided with: l.A White House cabinet meet- ing at which the strike situation war considered Attorney Gen- ornl Tom Clark said reconversion Director John W. Snyder termed the outlook "pretty bad." 2 A council of war by top men of the big CIO national maritime union. Its leaders from .0 ports assembled to talk strategy. The unions to which the west coast operator proposals will go the cooks and stewards, ma- rine firemen, and engineers. An hojrs-long discussion nt the lab- or department resulted in agree- ment to tender the offer. Bridges, Foi.sic to Meet In addition, a meeting was ar- ranged for the first time in more than -a week between Harry Bridges, president of the ClO-In- lernationa! Longshoremen and Warehousemen's union, and Frank P. Foisie, president 9f the Waterfront Employers' Associa- tion of the Pacific. The labor department, in pro- gr.irr.ming the maritime discus- sions aimed at heading off the Juno 15 walkout, by members of G CIO maritime unions and 1 in- dependent union, had delayed re- sumption of talks between those two." Talk Over "All Issues" In a statement after this morn- ing's discussion between the Pa- cific coast operators and repre- sentatives of the three unions with which they are involved, the parties reported: "The discussion encompassed all the issues involved in the dis- putes between the unions and the Pacific coast operators. Methods Fred Vinson Named As Chief Justice, Snyder To Cabinet Quick Approval by Senate Forecast for Truman's Nomi- nees, with Much Criticism Coming from Republicans And From Pro-Labor New Deal Democrat! Over Hit Selections By WILLIAM T. PEACOCK WASHINGTON, June Truman's choice of Fred M. Vinson for chief justice of the United States and of John V. Snyder for secretary of the treasury prompted predictions.today of speedy senate approval. "There will be no Senator Johnson told reporters. G. I. Terminal Pay Likely House Enthused Over Legislation to Pay For Furlough Time Missed In Uniform By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON, June Thf- house, with manifest enthu- today called up legislation to pay some past and present servicemen an average of each to cover furlough time missed uniform. Its backers, led by Rep. Dwight L. Rogers (D.-Fla.) and Robert L. Sikes (D.-Fla.) predicted its passage without opposition after a f'ew hours of debate and said t.he chances for oarly senate ap- proval "look good." The only amendment in sight was a non-controversial one in- tended to simplify payment mufhods. In preliminary form it w-juld permit enlisted men en- titled to terminal furlough mon- ey to claim it by mail, or collect il. in cash at local army or navy offices. Since Scptemoer 8, 1939 Here's what the legislation will do if it becomes law: Others echoed that forecast. And the same word wont out for the advnncomi-nl of John L. Sullivan from assistant to under secretary of the navy, also an- nounced by Mr. Truman in n single breath at his news con- ference late yesterday. Vinson's and Snydcr's selec- tions for two of the highest posts in the land came in for consider- able criticism, however, from republicans and from pro-labor, new deal democrats. But none indicated a. disposition to fight confirmation. All three nominees must receive senate approval be- fore they can take office. Privately, some new dealers said they would have preferred to see what they described as 
                            

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