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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 6, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             A premium goes bock on bobics with agreement of the house and senate that they will exempt all fathers from the draft when the extension of selective service is finally voted into being. Average Net I'uld Circulation 8271 MembiT: Audit Ilurcau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NE FINAL EDITION 43rd 45 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JUNE G, 1946 Hereford Heaven Tour Draws Many At Least Expected on Friday, Saturday Visits; Roy Rogers, Star of Western Movies, on Tour Friday Twelve of the fine ranches in Hereford Heaven will be visited Friday and Saturday when more than visitors are expected to be in attendance at the first annual Hereford Heaven tour that starts Friday morning at McMakin's Lazy K ranch near Marietta. FIVE CENTS THE COPY of C. Dines On 'Starvation Menu1 To Aid Food Drive The Chamber of Commerce did its part today toward the Emer- gency Food Drive whc-n members dined on a starv- ation menu at the regular Thurs- dav luncheon. The menu. xvhich parallels menus in Greece, Italy and other starving nations, consisted of spKt peu soup, 1 slice of bacon, 1 slice of bread and 1 cup of cof- fee. Luncheon tickets cost the regular 77 cents, but 57 cents of earn, ticket went to the Emergen- cy Food Relief. The program at the luncheon was in charge of James O. Braly, local chairman of the drive, and Mrs. Susan Nor- ris Davison, vice-chairman. NOTICE TO: the Home Demonstration Clubs, 4-H boys and girls of Pontotoc county, also to the citi- zens of Ada. We have been asked to contri- bute 1000 tin cans of food to be sent to the starving millions in the east. To do this we must have on understanding, as' to the hour, when and where. On Monday morning, June 10, from to a. m., I will broadcast plans by which we wish to fill our quota. If you are interested in help- ing with this program, be sure to tune in on KADA, June 10 at G a. m. Mrs. Jessie Morgan, HDA. Food in tin cans can't be bought too early for the 'Pick Up Food Monday, June 10. Weekend grocery shopping has already begun in many Ada hqvies. Housewives are again re- minded to purchase at least one extra can of food for each person in tuc family and place it on the Iro'i1. porch Monday morning for the Boy Scouts to collect. Large Cans Preferred Only food in tin cans can be packaged, shipped and distribu- ted under this plan. Large cans are preferred. On the list of re- quested items are milk, peanut butter (in tin fish, baby food, canned fruit, juices, and vegetables. If there are foods in your gar- den that can be canned, call Mrs. Morgan, county home demonstration agent, at 2153; the Home Demonstration clubs over the county are canning at least cans of food. On Friday from until o'clock at the Ada theater and Saturday morning at o'clock at the Ritz theater, the admis- lion will be or more cans of lord per child and two or more per adult. MUFFLE THOSE (AR EXHAUSTS Get New Muffler on or Fine Will Make It Expen- sive., Says McKeown i The visitors will be at Bill Li- kins Flying L ranch for lunch Fri- day at noon. Mr. Likins, who is president of the Hereford Heaven association, has been planning to feed persons but Wednesday night he was looking for addition- al food as he is expecting more as the time for the tour nears. Roy Rogers To Tour Friday Roy Rogers, star of western pictures, will be one of the at- tractions Friday as he has con- sented to make the first day of the tour. He will not be touring the i-anches Saturday as he is going to start work on a picture to be made in Hereford Heaven. Mr. Likin asserted that he had to go to great lengths to get Rogers to make any part of the tour and was delighted when the western star agreed to visit seven ranches Friday. Bill Likin, Roy J. Turner, Dean W. L. Blizzard, Al Darlow, Mrs. T. G. Wails, the Flying L Quar- tet and a quartet from Sulphur appeared on a 30 minute program heard Wednesday evening over radio station KADA. Just The Beginning Turner is president of the Am- erican Hereford Breeders Asso- ciation and owner of the famous Turner Ranch that is located near Sulphur. Mr. Turner told the ra- dio audience that1 the Hereford Heaven Association tour this year is only the beginning of a grow- ing undertaking. Mr. Turner said that he believes lhat the Hereford Heaven Asso- ciation tour this year will be probably the largest such tour ever held in Oklahoma. Visitors From Other States Many ranchers from other slates attended the dispersion sale of Jack Turner's herd at Ft. Worth early this week and will attend part of the Hereford Hea- ven tour. Visitors to the 12 ranches will be given an opportunity to in- spect barns and other equipment used on the now famous ranches in Hereford Heaven. Pastures will be inspected by many, who are wondering how cattle can thrive so readily on pasture grass. Some visitors do not expect to make the first part of the tour and for that reason a list follows of ranches and the hour that the tour is expected to be at each. The Schedule McMakins Lazy K, located three-fourths miles south and one Orlando May Be Italy's President Only Survivor of Versailles Big Four, Now 86, Favorably Regarded By GEORGE E. BRIA ROME, June V i 11 o r i o Emanuele Orlando was winning wide men- tion today as a likely compro- mise candidate tor first president of Italy's new republic as the na- tion awarited formal proclama- tion of the' end of the monarchy. Orlando, only survivor of the Big Four of Versailles, was being proposed, political observers said, because as a Sicilian he would be able to repair the schism shown at the polls between the industrial the repub- the sup- ported the house of Savoy. Communists Oppose Him It appeared likely, however, that Orlando would face power- ful opposition from the commun- ists, third strongest party in the weekend elections. Palmiro Tog- liatto, minister of justice and a communist leader, declared in a final campaign speech that the communists -'never" 'would col- laborate with Orlando, whose na- tional democratic union ran fourth in the balloting. Another "venerable old man" of Italian politics, 78-year-old Ivanhoe Bonomi, who led two pro- visional governments during It- aly's status as a co-belligerent, also was being suggested as a presidential candidate. His sup- porters said he was less of a mon- archist than Orlando and thus perhaps more suitable to a new regime. King Umberto II, meantime, prepared to follow his father into exile, his brief reign ended under the crushing weight of nearly votes favoring a republi- can form of government. Will Be Named June 24 The first president of the new state will be selected at the new Senate And House Bracing For Tug Of War About Drafting Of Teen-Agers People of Normandy Today Pay Tribute to Americans Who Surged Ashore Two Years Ago By G. K. HODENFIELD TREVIERS, France, June people of Normandy paid tribute today to a memorable morning two years ago when al- lied troops, in the greatest inva- sion in history, surged over their beaches to begin the long, bloody attack against Europe. Hitler's fortress Clutching one of her own youngsters and one she kidnaped from a neighbor, this monkey mother clings to bars near ceiling her cage_ and screams defiance at attempts to recover the stolen baby. An inmate of the Treffich Pet Stop in New York, the monkey re- cently bore twins. One of them died and she promptly appropriat- ed one of another monkey's offspring to make up the deficit. This was latest monkey headache for the proprietor. Recently over 100 of the simians escaped and overran the neighborhood. OPA facing Hard Battle and one-eighth mile west of Mar- ietta on Highway 77, 8 a.m. Fri- Moss Patterson's Lazy S, loca- ted 11 miles north of Ardmore or 13 miles south of Davis on high- way 11, a.m. Friday; Bill Likens' Flying L, located two miles east of Davis on High- way 7 and five miles south of highway, 11 a.m. Lunch will be served at noon. At 2 p.m., the tour will travel to the J. K. Powell ranch three and a quarter miles cast of Sul- phur on Highway 7. The T. G. Wails ranch, located four, miles south of Sulphur on Highway 1C, will be the scene of the tour at p.m. The Colvert ranch, located three miles south of the Wails ranch then East to markers and north to ranch, will be visited at p.m. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2} Warren H. Lewis Dies Here After Extended Illness Warren H. Lewis, 23 years old, died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James W. Lewis, 223 South Francis, at Thurs- day afternoon. Funeral arrange- ments had not been made at 3 o'clock. A brother and sister live in California, and another broth- er was on his way back to the Hawaiian islands. The time they can arrive will determine final arrangements. The young man grew up in Ada, attended public schools and had started his collegiate course in East Central. He served for 17 months in the army, being sta- tioned most of the time at the Army Air base in Amarillo. Be- fore going into the service, a skin trouble developed, which troubled him most of the time he was in the service, and he was finally given a medical dis- charge. While he has been better and worse many times since his' return home, it was not until about six weeks ago that he ap- peared to be fatally ill. He spent more than a month in the hos- pital, but was returned to the home about ten days ago. Supporters of Extension Fighting to Hold Some Powers for OPA Setup By FRANCIS J. KELLY WASHINGTON, June An OPA bill laden with grief for the administration began its journey to the senate floor to- day. Over bitter minority protests, the banking- committee drafted a formal recommendation to the chamber that it vote to extend pries control one year beyond j in sharply curtailed form. Chairman Wagner" who. led a losing administration fight against -drastic revisions in the present law, announced he I urs during the three weeks pe- would issue a report denouncing I riod. Books, periodicals and films E, C. Workshop !s Under Way First of Two Summer Special Conference Series In Opening Week Now 4 On Monday, June 3, East Cen- tral State college opened its third annual Health Education Work- shop in cooperation with the State Department of Education and the State Department of Health. This workshop is held at one o'clock each afternoon Mon- day through Friday in Room 103, Science Hall, and will continue for two more wetks. Teachers and citizens who at- tend the workshop have the ad- Vantage of discussion, of health methods, practices and problems with teachers and health work- The commpmorntion was held for the most part without fan- i heroism and sacrifice by the men who came to free them. They also recall many anecdotes which put a touch of humor to the grim clays. Humor There, Too .Pierre Aoust, who used to be "Pierre of the Ritz-Carleton" in York, poured another toast to the men of the 2nd infantry di- vision, which captured Treviers and recounted how he stood at Compromise May Be Reached to Exempt Those 18 Years Old Both Branches Agrttd On Banning Induction of Fath- ers, 18 Months Limit fare or revelry, but with a dignity j the door of his hotel Laiglon and befitting an occasion when men fought' and died to liberate other men from the yoke of oppression. In St. Mere Eglise there was an all-day obseavance honoring the men of the 82nd airborne division which floated out of the sky two years ago to begin the invasion. In Bayeux and Caen there was anniversary celebrations honor- ing the British and Canadian troops who fought there. Quiet In Small Villages But in most of the little vill- ages and along most of the dusty roads bordered by hedge-rows the people of Normandy regarded the day quietly. They prayed for the men who came them and who stayed behind un- der the white cross or Star of David in one Normandy's nine American military cemeteries. Many of them told once again yelled: "Come in for a drink. The bochfc has gone for a jump in the river." Many men accepted his invita- tion for "one on the then left again to continue the bitter hedge-row bottle. Not far away, Lear Le Moiay, Madame Rene to hundreds of American soldiers as "Mrs. recalled how she stood along the 'road in front of her house waving to the troops and shouting the only English words she knew, words remem- bered from the last war when she worked for two months in a Lon- don public house: "Good afternoon, gin? Whis- She can show people her scrap- book, full of- letters from soldiers who left Normandy to fight their way into Germany and who wrote stories they have been telling for back to thank her for her hospi- two years personal stories of tality. the changes. Although half a dozen mem- bers of the 19-man committee signified their intention to side. with the chairman, the effect on the senate during next week's de- bate was highly problematical. The house already has passed an extension bill which adminis- tration spokesmen have said would mean the end of price con- trol next month unless the senate look a different tack. Bowles Says "Monstrous" Here are some of the major features of the senate bill, con- demned as "monstrous" by Stab- arc used to .give information and to lead toward a better, more functional plan of instruction in health education. Anyone May Attend Anyone who wishes to take part in the conference but reg- ular registration is required where college credit is to be this weeks granted. A summary of work: environment. Lighting, ventilating, heating and school housekeeping in terms of the child. Panel: Gordon M. Har- rel. Dr. John R. Chandler and Dr. ilization Director Chester Bowles Victor H. Hicks all of Ada.'' even before its completion: The Roy Turner Ranch is the I The physician who knew War- D. of ___ mobiles with straight exhausts until June 15 to have a muffler installed replacing the 'straight'. He says that it will be cheaper for owners of such cars to have a muffler installed rather than pay a fine. The county attorney said Thursday morning that fines will range from S25 to and that there will be no exemptions. He has received several com- plaints about the cars with and in each instance the type of muffler has been installed to replace regular mufflers. "There is no need for people not using mufflers on their auto- mobiles and after June 15, there will be a lot the county at- torney said. OKLAHOMA CITY, June Frank Haven, vice pres- ident of the Liberty National bank and Oklahoma City civic leader, died in last night. a hospital here The 70-yeai-old banker came to Oklahoma in 1000, entering the mercantile business at Okmulgee. A native of Dt-nison, Tex., Ha- ven had been a banker here since 1905. He aided in organizing the annual Oklahoma Livestock shows. last ranch scheduled on the Fri- day part of the tour. Sulphur Chamber of Commerce will be host at a dinner served Friday night at Sulphur. All per- l sons making the tour are invited i to attend this dinner and other i entertainment that ished. Waterline Break Hits Water Users Temporary Repairs Made; Announcement Will Pre- cede Permanent Repair Shut-Off ren in the army flew to Okla- homa City from Chicago and was rushed to Ada early Wednesday morning. Warren was popular with every one. Large and powerful for his age, jolly and good natured, every one loved him. After his discharge from the army he decided he wanted to be a medical doctor, and had started his pre-medical education at East Central. Surviving .-are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James W. Lewis; four brothers, Col., James Lynn, sta- tioned .at Palo Alto, California; W. Howard of Ada; Capt. Her- bert, stationed in Hawaii; and Cpl. Raymond, who flew from Ger- many where he was in the army I occupation-forces; and three sis- j ters, Mrs. Kathryn Cox of Ada, Mrs. Edith Irene Stratman of Los A walerline break near the city i Angeles, 'Calif and Miss Evelyn reservoir just southeasl of Ada LewJS of the address. 4 about 3 a. m. Thursday forced a water shut-off here for Thurs- day morning. Gene Klepper, water superin- tendent, said temporary repairs had been made at the break but that more work was needed there and that he will make announce- ment ahead of time when work- men will cut the water off to make lasting repairs. Some repairs have been under way on the 14-inch line without affecting water users but the break of last night wasn't 'on schedule' and brought on an emergency .situation. 1 Price control over livestock, mef.t, poultry, eggs and dairy products would end this June 30. 2. The secretary of agriculture rather than the price administra- tor would say what other farm products could be kept under price ceilings. 3. A decontrol board, indepen- dent of OPA, would be establish- ed with power to overturn the price administrator's refusal to lift controls from any specific commodity. 4. "Cost absorption" would be out OPA would be forbidden to interfere with normal markups and discounts of wholesalers and retailers of so-called "reconver- e a 11 h education. Methods of instruction to make information functional with the individual and in the school and community. Panel: Arguyle Sei- kel. Oklahoma City, Dr. .R. H. Mayes, Ada, Mrs. Viola Griffith, Okemah, and Mrs. Flossie Beck- ett, Wewoka. and control of communicable diseases. Case isolation, vaccination, inno- culation as the school is concern- ed with them. Panel: Miss Anna Weaver Jones, Dr. G. K. Stev- ens, Miss Fannie Warren, all of Ada, and Miss Josephine Daniels of Oklahoma City. that may be used in health education. Use sion items" These include auto-; of agencies through school in- m, Fines Pay To City Wednesday City police made four arrests Wednesday and collected fines amounting to on the three counts, according to records at the police station. One person was arrested and charged with drunk driving. He fined and released, from rhe city jail. Three drunks were arrested {WEATHER pklahoma Tair tonight and Friday, wrrme.r east-and south tonight and east Friday. fYKT c am1 fined each for bringing _OKLAHOMA CITY, June the tota] of money received from lines to Boss M. Routh has re- sumed his duties as executive of- ficer in the state adjutant gen- eral's office. Routh, who left that office in 1940 to serve with the 45th division, will join George Ade Davis, adjutant general, and Lt. Gen. Raymond S. McLain in a program to reorganize the Ok- lahoma National Guard. ENID, Juna Great Lakes double quartet, formerly with the U. S. navy choir, will ap- pear in concert at Enid June 10. The quartet will broadcast over an Enid station during the after- noon, of the date of their appear- ance here. mobiles, refrigerators, radios, washing machines and similar items whose wartime production was curtailed 25 per cent or more by government order. Slash In Subsidies 5. The in subsi- dies requested by OPA would.be cut to with a pro- vision that no food subsidies could be paid after May 1, 1947. If the decontrol of meat and dairy products stands up in the senate, the food subsidies probably will be cut to about for the 10 months. The subsidies are paid to growers and processors to make up for higher production costs not passed in to the public an the form of increased ceiling prices. 6. OPA's controversial "map" (maximum average price) order, designed to keep the manufac- ture of low priced clothing going, would'be repealed. 7. OPA could not put any item under control which not not con- frolled May 1 this and could inaugurate no new subsidies.' 8. Items not important to liv- ing costs or business costs, must be taken out from under price control by the end of this year. BARTLESVILLE, June Phillips, who through the Frank Phillips foundation has tluence for better understanding of health problems and practices. Panel: Mrs Bertha Teague, Mrs., ,...._, Jessie Mercer Davis, both of Ada WASHINGTON, June 6, Caboose Gets Worst Of Collision On Frisco Line Here Damages estimated at more than were done about n.m Thursday morning when a freight train engine crashed into the caboose of another train that was. parked on the main line, ac- cording to local Frisco officials. A train that had been traveling' north stopped on the main track inside the yards and the engine oncl crew had gone further into the yards to make up. Tl-ie train that crashed into the caboose of the stopped train was a double-header and apparently Jind not slowed down when the occurred. Most of the jolt of accident felt by the mov- ing train was when the emergen- cy brakes were applied in an ef- fort to stop the train. moving engine rammed the caboose against a flat car which was pushed almost through the caboose The front of the engine was driven into the caboose. A wrecker was cnlled from Denison and local railroad offi- cials said that the wreck would be cleared from the track before p.m. Thursday. Traffic was not stopped as a siding is being used by trains en- tering and leaving Ada. The second engine of the double-header backed up from the wreck and ptolled its loads to Francis where it was stopped in :he yards. DUCK HUNTING WILL BE LIGHT AFL Walkout Adds To U.S. Maritime Labor Crisis Today By MAX HALL WASHINGTON, June 6, A nationwide walkout of AFL seafarers to discuss "matters of great importance" crashed into the already tense maritime labor crisis today. Thousands of AFL crewmen made ready to quit their ships simultaneously on the Pacific, Atlantic and Gulf Coasts at 2 p. m. (EST) while in Washing- ton, CIO maritime leaders and ship operators met again to tr> to avert a CIO strike scheduled for June 15. The AFL "stop" work meet- halt activity aboard ships for as many hours as the discussions continue. Figuring ,Own Flans But there was evidence tha the AFL at Atlantic and Gulf ed to discuss as well their course of action if next week's strike ol CIO Seamen and Dock Workers materializes. As maritime labor trouble1 spread rapidly, the news in Wash- ington included: 1. Eastern ship operators last night rejected the latest undis- closed offer of the CIO National Maritime union. It was be- lieved to call for overtime pay after 44 hours a week nt sen, instead of the original union de- mand of 40 hours. The operators insist on the present 56-hour standard work week at sea. House Committee To Act 2. The house labor committee scheduled a meeting to discuss the whole maritime situation. This was the first official action on Capitol Hill with respect to the threatened strike. _ ...j, WJL. ._ i ui v; 11 Jicil LtrlJuU SLI 1 A.C and Mrs Eula Fullerton of Okla- uck hunters this year face a 3. President Truman called on noma City. shorter shooting season, a reduc- j the CIO Maritime unions and the Health Examinations Friday Health examinations in the school. The realm of the school's possibilities in examina- tions and the advantages of the daily check, of students. Panel: Dr. Ollie McBride, Ben Morrison, both of Ada and Miss Mary Jo Kraft, Shawnee. The program for the next two (.Continued on Page 2 Column 2) ed bag limit, or both. This will tor Albert M. Day of the fish and wildlife service said today, "to halt and revers the alarming de- cline in the wild duck popula- tion." In the past two years, Day said, there has been an average decline of about birds a year. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads j employers to "buckle down and through col- Jectivc bargaining." 4. The CIO unions published full-page advertisements in sev- eral newspapers asserting that "the threat of a strike will dis- appear overnight if the ship op- erators offer something reason- able" on a shorter work-week a- board ship and higher wages. Read the Ada News Want Ads. Letter Proves Krupp, Supposed Leaders Of German Republic Started Rearmament Program in Hitler's Rise aided the Boy Scout movement in treaty of Versailles was signed America, was honored recently at j and 13 years before Hitler came a dinner sponsored by the Chero- to power kee area council at Bartlesville. Phillips wan presented with a mai a UUBH-HUS.I booklet, an incentive to I loan was made avail- DEDUCE lor wrote proudly from exile in I the war cross of merit, first class. JNUbRNBERG, Germany, June Switzerland to old gun-maker in appreciation of your accomp. o, records of the -n_.j _ Krupp dynasty laid bare today the secret origin of German re- armament in the supposedly beaten and bankrupt Weimar re- public barely a year after the Documents in allied hands pro- vide evidence that a hush-hush issued by the national Boy Scout i organization which describes in detail the operation of the Phillips foundation in the scout move- ment. Walter W. Head, immedi- ate past president of the Boy Scouts of America, made the pre- sentation. able to Krupp's'in 1920 by a man who was reich chancellor and finance minister three years be- fore Hitler had even marched in his, 1923 beer hall putsch. In 1940, when Germany had beaten France and was poised to invade England, the ex-chancel- Gustav Krupp Von Bohlcn Und lishments in arming the German Halbach in his stone palace in the wehrmacht. smoke-wreathed Rhur. Could Do It Today The letter, signed Wirth" and recovered from the Krupp files in Essen, is regarded by allied investigators as typify- ing brazenly the hidden partner- ship of industrial magnates and presumably democratic politi- cians to restore German military might. "That partnership operated a quarter-century ago just as it might do said one. "Most honored Herr the letter "Swiss papers carry the news that you are the first German to be decorated with We Laid Foundations" "I have the honor to state that this fact has been noted down with pleasure in my memories and I look with satisfaction lo the years 1920-23 when we both xxxx laid the new foundations for the development of German armament' technique with the help of your great-and most im- portant firm. "I am putting down these lines in order to make a record in my files, in which there is alreadv the letter of Dr. Wiedtfeld of 1921 which sets forth that, By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON, June House and senate braced todny for a tug of war over resuming the teen age draft. But there were hints of a compromise mak- ing 19-year-old eligible and ex- empting those of 18. The two chambers found them- selves poles apart on the teen age issue in their efforts to decide how to continue the draft. The senate is overwhelmingly for con- tinued use of teen agers in the services, the house just as over- whelmingly against it. The senate pushed the ques- tion toward a showdown when it gave a thumping 69 to 8 majority yesterday lo its bill for keeping the main provisions of the war- lime draft act in force until next May. Although it differed on a num- ber of points from the house mea- sure voted April 13, the teen aRe provision promised to be the big stumbling block in the bill which the senate passed alpng to a sen- ate-house conference committee. Several Tasks Involved The conferees, seyen and seven representatives, must adjust all the differences and per- suade congress lo accept their recommendations between now and June 30, when the present law expires. -Here is their proh- 1cm: Length of Hx'.ension; The sen- ate voted to continue the draft until next Muy 15; the houac un- til next February 15. Age of inductions: The by a 53 to 20 count voted lo con- tinue inducting It) and 10-year- olds; the house by a 195 to 99 tally ordered a halt to teen-ace inductions. The top draft age in the house bill is 29; in the sen- ate's, 44. Pay raises: Thu' senate wrote into its bill pay raises for enlisted grades only, ranging from 50 per- :ent for buck privates to smaller soosls for ton sergeants and cor- responding ranks in the other services. The house refused to put jay raises into the draft bill but voted in separate legislation for raises ranging from 50 percent for buck privates to 10 percent for five-star genr-rals. Induction the ordered a moratorium on all in- ductions prior to October 15. The senate turned that proposal down. Agree On Some Provisions The Iwo branches are in virtual agreement on these provisions of their separate bills: A ban against induction ot fathers, regardless of age. A limit of 18 months of service for induclcd men. A prohibition against any In- ductions that wil) give the army more than men by July J it4 I Conlinualion of ro-omployment benefits specified in the wartime draft act. The expect little dif- ficulty compromising all the dif- ferences except the teen-age pro- vision. But on that question n knock-down, drag-out fight was in prospect. SHAWNEE, jtine Shawnee city commission has vot- ed to lift a tax assessed dairy owners supplying milk to local consumers. Dr. Charles Haygood. county health director, said the Lax was "producing more irrita- tion than revenue." The tax was levied at a rate of 50 cents for the first cow and 25 cents for additional dairy :iead. It was designed to supply to finance city inspection of the dairies. TH' PESSIMIST Bob BlinVi. Jr. (Continued on Page 2, Column 2) Some folks, who're alluj brsggin' about the'r ances- tors, ought t' keep in mind th' older th' seed th' poorer th' ci op. Sooner er later, nearly ever' married couple con- cludes that th' other is so hcrdheaded that ther' ain't nothin' t' do about it an' lives quietly ther'after.   

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