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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 5, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 5, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             An Ado mon wearing a felt hat at noon and a strow olong in the offernoon explained that he was frying to keep up wifrh the weather but figured he was still three days behind the chang... Nft M.iy Paid Circulation 8271 Member: Audit Uurc.iu of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 44 OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 1946 CENTS THE CQpT ADA VOTES IN COUNCIL-MANAGER PLAN Dozens Die In Chicago Hotel Fire Lasalle Hotel Blaze Scene Some of 200 Injured Feared Fatally Hurt; Worst Hotel Fire in City's History CHICAGO. June least 57 persons were killed many suffocated in their bods y.-ithout being jn rn early morning fire that through the 22-story La Salip hotol in the heart of Chi- cago's loop district. F'.-e department sources estim- ated about 200 persons were in- jured. The first alarm was turned in at a.m., when most of the 1100 guests had retired for the night. Within 10 minutes the first throe floors were engulfed in f la Ties and both of tho main strict exits from tho 37-year-old hostelry wore impassable. Five extra alarms were sound- ed ;.nd more than 300 firemen hauled the bringing it un- der control abjut a.m. -Most of those who were burned hud been housed on the third fourth, fifth and sixth floors. About (lie sixth floor, smoke and panic claimed their victims. At least 10 pei-sons died as they leaped from their rooms and fell lo the street or in a courtwuy 29 Not Identified Of the 57 bodies which over- flowed the county were- listed as unidentified. On many of the bodies there were onlv a few fragments of burned clothing, which crumbled when touched. In addition three unidentified of two young boys and a not been re- moved from St. Luke's hospital to ihe morgue 32 hours after the blaze. Fi'e Marshal Michael Corrigan, calling the fire the worst in his years of experience and "one of the hardest to said firemen had heard three explo- sions, spaced about a minute and B naif apart, were heard preced- ing discovery of the fire. Fire department and Hod Cross officials, working feverishly through the morning hours, announced the number of fatal- ities as firemen made a final search of the rums for additional bodies. Early, only a few of the virums had bc-en identified. More than 300 firemen Bread Shortage Is Severe in St. Louis There may be a bread shortage m St. Louis, but not in Ft. Worth, Texas. Miss Sally McGinley 17 iTn'k -w P1rJS "'I ala Ft' Worth slorc' left' which shu sent to a friend in St.' Louis, Mo. Hearing of the severe bread shortage in St. Louis, Sally thought she ought to do some- m ukd "cNEA PI Sasebee, Parcel Post clerk, liow the bread should be Food Drive On In Ada Now nine 75 pieces of equipment, and sc.-me 250 policemen aided in fighting the. blaze and in rescuing scores of persons trapped in the 838-room hotel, located in the center of Chicago's financial dis- trict at La Salle and Madison streets. -Most of Dead Suffocated Fire officials said most of the dead apparently had suffocated after they were unable to make tneir way to safety through the heavy clouds of smoke which poured into the first half do7.cn iloors. Others lost their lives when they attempted lo escape bv jumping. The bodies of several were found on a third floor rear landing. There was wild confusion inside the 37-year-old hostelry as scores of tne guests, many of them in their night cUuhing, ran to open windows, waving bcdclothing and screaming for help. Most of the pucsts in rooms above the sixth floor were rescued by firemen or lied by way of fire escapes. Mow- ever, the smoke was reported so at-r.se on the lower floors, scores were unable If grope their way to an exit or to a window to be rescued. The hotel management reported between and 1.200 guests were in the building when the fire broke out. A flt-et of Mj patrol wagons, all available .imhulimt'es and private automobiles wnx- used to remove ini- dead and dying to hospitals. An emergency morgue was set up in the city hyll building, a block awav. IT" Show Admissions With Canned Food Announced; Citywide Food Pick-Up Monday James O. Braly, local chairman, has designated Monday, Juno 10, as 'Pick Up Food Duy' -for the Emergency Food Collection Drive now under way in Ada. Food lo be donated to the drive is to bo placed in a conspicious place on the front porches Mon- day morning so that the Boy Scouts accompanying the pick-up trucks can find it without ringing doorbells. Housewives are asked to re- member the starving men, women, and children in the Eastern Hemisphere when they buy their groceries Saturday morning. The Scouts will ask for one can per person'in Ihe family, but il is hoped that many will give more. What Foods Are Needed Nothing fancy has been asked. Most needed foods are canned milk, peanut butter (in tin cans') fish, baby food, canned fruit, juices, and vegetables. Large cans arevpreferrcd. If you have a surplus in your garden and would like to contri- bute food from it, call Mrs. Jes- sie Morgan, county home demon- slralion agehl, at 2153; the Home Demonstration clubs over the county are canning at least cans of food. Vice-chairman of the drive and chairman of the publicity com- mittee, Mrs. Susan Davison, an- nounces a radio program tonight at over KADA. Participants Two Pay Fines On Grand Jury Actions Two Other Indictments Not Revealed as Arrests Not Yet Made; Much Equipment Seized at Time Gamblers Arrested As. a result of indictments returned by the recent grand jury, M. C. and W. P; (Pap) Jeter Tuesday pleaded guilty to gambling and fines of each and costs were assessed by Judge Tal Crawford, according to County Attorney Tom D. McKeowri. Each paid into the court fund Woman Hit by Car Is Recovering; Driver Is Cleared As the result of a traffic acci- dent that occurred on West Main street about 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Belle Bloom, 67, of 401 West Tenth, is in Cowling hospital suffering from painful bruises and lacerations. City police reported that she was crossing the street at Stock- ton avenue and stepped into the path of a car driven by M. M. McDonald, .Route 2, Stratford. They also cleared McDonald of blame for the accident, saying that he swung past the middle line of the street trying to miss the pedestrain, who apparently had become confused after avoid- ing another, car. Wednesday morning Mrs. Broom was reported at the hospi- tal to have numerous bruises and The Red Cross also set up aid stations at the scene and at the city hall and at ihe several hospitals where the injured were taken. Thousands lined Madison and .La balle streets and watched the firemen fight the stubborn blaze and rescue trapped guests. The -aO policemen, as well as military police and n-jvy shore patrolmen aiaed in the rescue of forts. Fire Commissioner Michael J Corrigan said the blaze was dis- covered about a.m. (cdt) in tne lobby ann flames spread rap- idly through elevator shafts. Me said although flames shot up elevator shaft to the roof of the building, mojt of tho fire dam- ace was confined to the lower six floors. of 1 tablespoon of: macaroni cook- ed in sailed water, 2 lettuce leaves chopped and without dressing, 1 thin slice of dark bread and seven raisins. On Friday fi'om J :00 o'clock un- til o'clock admission at the Ada theater will be one or more cans of food per child find two or more cans for each adult. On Saturday morning al o'clock the admission will be the same at a big show at the Ritz. through the into the cheek. She was conscious, however, and believed in improv- ing condition. i A ti i nujijtiii in i 1 f til----------------------- will be William G. Harris Rev i scratches and to have a deep cut Victor Halfiold, Miss s'etty th" Hughes, Mrs. Virginia Sugg Ram- say and Homer Pcay. Civic Clubs Cooperate Local civic clubs will dine next week on starvation menus, pay- ing the difference in the cost in (pod either in cash or canned foods to alleviate hunger in Europe and Asia. A typical luncheon will consist Telegraph Rafes To Go Up Soon WASHINGTON, June Telegraph rates are going up 10 pei1 cent in about 30 days to meet what the federal communications commission calls Western Un- ion's ''dire need for additional revenue." The commission limited the rate increases to a one year per- iod and also permitted "Western Union to revise certain classes of service. After filing revised rate sched- ules with the. commission, the company can. put the new rates into effect on 30 days' notice. They npply to full rate, day letter, night letter, serial and press mes- sages. The commission's majority opinion said the increases "are being allowed as an emergency measure to afiord' Western Union an opportunity to continue and Long Shot Horse Wins Epsom Derby LONDON, June J. Ferguson's Airborne won the 163rd running of the Derby at EPsom Downs today. njlu Ihe favorite. Lord Derby's Gulf j improve its operations, x x x In (WEATHER fair to- r.ighl and Thursday; warmer cx- c-c-p; pun handle: highest Thurs- day upper HO's jn east to middle DO'.s ia wcit. Stream was sycond. Tom Lillcy's Radiotherapy was third. Airborne was a 50 to 1 outsider in. the betting. Airborne was a length in front of Gulf Stream at the finish. A huge throng, including the rayol family, who made their first trip to the Derby by rail, was on hand Vor the return of the ancient classic to Epsom Downs for the first lime since the war. Airborne was ridden by T. Lowrcy, scoring his first derby victory. Read the Ada News Want Ads. Two other indictments were returned, but the accused have not yet been arrested and their names are withheld until arrests have been made. In addition to the fines paid in- to .the court fund, knd considerable equipment were seized on the raid Friday night and the disposition of these are awaiting a forfeiture order by the district court. McKeown is investigating the possibility of disposing of the equipment so as to net the coun- ty additional revenue.'He thinks there is a possibility the equip- ment may be disposed of in Mex- ico. The grand jury adjourned Tuesday after recessing work on Monday; a recess had followed four days of hearings in April. Coast Guard, Navy Counting Manpower CG Suspends Discharges To See If Must Help Man Cargo Ships WASHINGTON, June, The coast guard as well as the navy counted its manpower to- day as the big there be a- maritime strike June over Washington, The coast guard sent out stop orders on discharges which it lat- er explained applied only to regu lar pirsonnpl in over-mannec ratings who had been allowed to apply for discharge before their enlistment terms were up. This affects approximately 000, out of a total coast guard strength of in ratings now above their authorized peacetime levels. The coast guard said re- servists are continuing to be dis- charged as before. Naval stations were reporting to headquarters on. the number of men on hand with cargo-ves- sel experience. There was no secret among of- ficials that if the joint strike of CIO seamen and dock workers takn.s place, the government will have a problem finding qualified men to operate the merchant Hereford Tour June 7 and 8 This Time It's on Invita- tion of Hereford Heaven Association1 Ranchers This year brings something new to the folks who like to visit in Hereford tour through Hereford Heaven spon- sored by the Hereford Heaven Association and not a part of annual Oklahoma Hereford Tour" Some time ago the association members decided they'd like to have their friends spend more tour-time in Hereford Heaven it- self. So the first annual Hereford Heaven Association tour of Fri- day and Saturday, June 7 and 8, is the result. Many Accept Invitation The Hereford breeders sent out hundreds of invitations and back came hundreds of acceptances. This tour will be less rushed and less 'formal' than the usual tours. It will take the ranchers and their guests not only to the famous top ranches but through the backyard portions of Here- ford Heaven where they will see that Hereford Heaven is a truly great ranching area with fine herds and ranches in addition to the show places and noted show herds, Cere's The Itinerary ,The tour starts at McMakin's Lazy K ranch Friday at 8, moves to Moss Patterson's Lazy S, to Bill Likens Flying L for lunch, goes on to the J. K. Powell Dr T. G, Wails, Colvert ranches and to Turner Ranch by Friday night at Sulphur there will be a tour reception and din- ner as guests at the Sulphur Chamber-of -Commerce. Saturday the tourists will start with Lester Blair's Polled Here- ford ranch west of Ada, go on to L. P. Carpenter's near Stonewall, to C. C. Buxton and Sons (Horseshoe Ranch) for lunch, visit the W. E. Harvey Ranch and end at the W. A. Delaney, Jr Lazy D ranch near Ada. Senate Works On Draft Law Pay Boost, Teen Age Re- sumption Okayed, Then Bill Runs Into Trouble By EDWIN B. HAAKINSON WASHINGTON, June Senators wearied by hours of wrangling appeared set today to reject a proposal for a "draftless maneuver designed to block inductions of teen agers. The senate yesterday voted to resume the drafting of 18 and 19 year olds and'senators who want to keep the selective service law intact were confident of defeating any draft "holiday." The teen draft cleared the chamber by a vote of 53 to 26. The leadership then put on steam in an effort to get the draft extension bill Back to the house. It rammed through, 67 to 4, a graduated pay boost for enlisted men and non-commissioned offi- cers that would give privates and apprentice seamen, the lowest Charter Change Gets Majority Action Being Speeded to Obtain Governor's Approval, Leading to Council Election, Change Over in Governmtnt By a more than two-to-one majority, Ada voters Tuesday set aside the form of government which has been functioning here since 1912 and decided to establish the council-manager form of government soon to be put into effect. The official vote totals were: Yes, 1021; No, 440. Fourteen years ago a ranks, a 50 percent hike to a month. Bill Meets Trouble But then trouble, the bill ran into Three republican senators, Rc- vcrcomb Wilson (Iowa) and Wherry (Neb.) put forth their substitute bill. It would continue draft registrations and job benefit sections of the present selective service act but suspend all inductions. Furthermore, the trio insisted on a chance to debate before the roll was call.jd. This produced a tempestuous scene with Senators Ma'yWank (D-SC) and Tydings (D-Md) try- ing to upset the move of demo- cratic Leader Barkley (Ky) to re- cess the chamber. Finally after a series of quorum calls Barkley was upheld at p.m. on a rollcall vote of 45 to 17. The draft act currently is oper- ating under a six-week stop-gap extension that-runs out July 1. Its age limits are 20 through 29, but the senate restored the war- time 18 through 44 yesterday, proposal was defeated in a close vote. Voting Tuesday was light dur- .'ng the first half of the-day. It negan to pick up during the noon hour and zealous work of a group of supporters of the proposed chorter change during the latter of the afternoon got many more voters to the polls. Governor's Appwval Next Step The next step is to secure the approval of Gov. Robert S. Kerr of the charter change, then call- 'ng of an election to select a city council of five men, the election of the council and setting up of the altered city government. This, officials here believe, will require but a few weeks. Quick approval of the governor is being sought so that the coun- .-i. c.'ection can be held in a short time and the ing employment of a city man- ager and cily personnel under a revised organizational can begin early in the new fiscal year beginning July 2. l''ive Precincts Said 'No' There were five of the city's j.7 precincts which turned down the proposal, three of them in Ward 3. The five precincts in Ward 1 gave the council-manager pro- posal an overwhelming majority '.he highest percentage margin coming m Ward 1, Precinct 3 with 112 for and 4 against. Larg- est vote cast was in 4-2, the high school box, with 164 for and 15 against. The vote was the culmination of a move begun early this year by o group of. citizens who were convinced that Ada's city govern- ment was bogged down in inef- VOTE BY PRECINCTS Ward-Prec." Tci 108 51 112 62 83 8 78 61 90 19 14 32 18 43 164 87 30 20 2S 31 It 17 13 21 23 S3 33 40 in 37 in 41 44 Tot.ils....................1021 fleet as President -Truman has promised to do. With the strike date only ten days off, weary union men and operators gathered again, at ______ view of Western Union's dire need tne laDOr department for more for additional revenue, we are of argument on whether the 56-hour the opinion that it should have the opportunity x x x to seek relief from operating losses by rate increases." Western Union had a deficit in March, the opinion said, adding: "At present rates it ex- pects to have a loss of about for the year 1946." The commission said the com- pany "alleged that it is faced with a -financial emergency caused by wage awards granted by the Na- tional War Labor board on De- cember 29, 1945." week can be reduced for men at sea. The seamen's work-week has become the nub of the whole dis- pute virtually swallowing the question of basic wage creases. These have been up in- de- manded but discussed very little to .date. America's automotive industry celebrates' 50 years of progress this spring. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Relief for Bread Shortage Soon New Wheat Crop Proving Big in Oklahoma, Texas CHICAGO, June 5, lines were forming in most of the nation's- stores and bakeries as the country experienced its W9rst wheat shortage, but the millers national federation pre- dicted relief in two or three weeks. However, Herman Steen, exe- cutive secretary of the federation, said yesterday "this is the worst week the millers will have" ani added that from 80 to 90 per cent of the nation's flour mills will shut down for lack of wheat to grind into flour. Scarcely any city escaped the pinch. However, two factprs pointed to an upturn. They were the new winter wheat crop, running 25 per cent above expectations, coming in Texas and Oklahoma; and a plan by the department of agriculture to divert some foreign relief wheat stocks to the most acute domestic' bread shortage areas. Steen predicted the shortage would be considerably relieved by mid-to-late July as more of the new winter crop readies the mills. He said, however, "govern- ment red shipping the grain from elevators to mills, get- ting the right "blend" for bread iu Liiiuugji it y 4" p even though the armed services considerable have said they do not want men was due to restrictions -plac- on city officials by the 1912 I charter; they also believed that divided authority among three over 25. The test found 22 republicans supporting the teen-age induction and 12 against. The democrats split 31 for and 13 against. With this out of the way, the senate proceeded to vote the pay increases. These range from the monthly for army privates and navy apprentice seamen to for top non-commissioned ranks. A later voice vote also exempt- ed from induction any man with an honorable discharge who had served overseas for as little as a day, or those who had served within the continental United States at camps or stations for as long as six months. Senator Edwin C. Johnson CD- Colo) said this would not exempt young men who had spent all their army time going to school. He mentioned dentists who he said have completed schooling and now are wanted by the army. When and if the senate com- pletes action the entire bill must go back to the house which twice has insisted that teen agers be exempt from induction. Hitchhiker'Leads Officers to Body Admits Shot Lubbock Man, Put Body in Culvert SAYRE, Okla., June The bullet torn body of a man identified tentatively as Arthur Clyde Sanders, 49, Lubbock, Tex., (route 6) was found beneath a culvert near here today after, Sheriff Earl Francis said, a hilch- i.'omrrnssi oners handicap. was a definite flour, and delivering the flour to hiker directed officers' lo the bakers, all would require a lime scene. lag of two or more weeks. Sheriff Francis said the hitch- hiker led the officers to the cul- vert after making a signed state- ment declaring he shot Sanders, who had offered him a ride to Amarillo, Tex., from Clinton, Okla. The sheriff said the hitchhiker said in the statement that the shooting occurred when Sanders decided to turn back to Clinton Anyway, If Works Burglar Alarm Goes Off Of Own Accord, Brings Cops, Patrol and Owner Tuesday night at about Abe Pollock was called from his lorne with a report that the burg- ar alarm in his business estab- lishment, the Smart Shop had gone off. Mr. Pollock rushed down and found the night watch- man, along with several police- men and members of the Okla- loma Highway Patrol, waiting or him. After checking everything it was found -nothing was miss- ng and that the alarm must have ripped accidentally. Everyone, especially Mr. Pollock, was very much relieved. TULSA, June instead of going on to Amarillo after picking him up. Sheriff Francis said the hitch- hiker made the statement when he was questioned concerning blood found in Sanders' automo- bile, which he was driving, when he was picked up on a warrant charging him with obtaining money under false pretenses. The warrant was issued, the sheriff said, when the hitchhiker bought parts for the automobile and( charged them to another man. said tentative Sanders was Sheriff Francis identification of made through papers found in the automobile alter, the hitchhiker's arrest. 3on Zilar, 23-year-old Miami war i The sheriff said the hitchhiker veteran, told police today a wo-1 broke down under questioning nan who him a ride in an I and'made the signed statement in utomobile drove off with his which he said Sanders was slain when he left her to make Monday night and his body hid- telephone call. den in the culvert. The move worked on through of the voters to agree to elect a board of freeholders to consider revision, election of the ooard, its studies and recom- menoations to the voters for the change. Changeover To Be Complete Tne changeover is one that has made by a number of Okla- .lorna cities of Ada's class in re- cent years. Under the new system the final authority for cijy affairs is in the hands of the five man council__ elected one from each ward and one at adminis- tration managed by a city man- Tlie council will elect a mayor trom among its' nuniber, provision is made in the revised charter for protection or lunds, for covering purchase and expenditure handling, for auditing, for inventory of citv properties. y The incoming officials will also face a situation in which the op- ions of Ada government for the Jast three months of this fis- cal year ending June 30 are being paid for out of income of the coming funds hav- ing been, exhausted in the first nine months of the .present fiscal Baseball Film To Be Shown Twice Jaycees See '45 World Series Tonight, Public In- vited to Thursday Night Showing Tonight in the Ada highscho'ol auditorium, the Jaycees will have their regular meeting with the program being a 45-minute film on "Highlights of the 1945 World Series." It is a picture showing the high spots of all the seven games in the series and all Jaycees are urg- ed lo allend. Refreshments will be served following the picture. Thursday night the same film will be shown for the public, sponsored by Wr.yne Vickers and Elvan George, with all boys inter- ested in the sport urged to attend and any adults or others who would like to see the film cordi- ally invited to be there. CLINTON. June Kiper, Clinton insurance man and president of the western Okla- homa Hereford Breeders associa- tion, has been elected president of the Shortgrass Hereford Breed- ers, Inc., which embraces 22 northwestern Oklahoma counties. L. A. Need of Enid is vice pres- ident and J. B. Hurst, also of Enid, is secretary-treasurer. Read the News Classified Ads. Stolen Truck Found, Bike, Automatic Reported Stolen Police officials reported today that the 1946 U-i-ton green Chevrolet truck owned by Stef- fens dairy that was reported sto- len Monday has been recovered in Oklahoma City and is being stored there. The negro boy who took it was picked up in Ada driving a 1938 Ford 4-door sedan which he had stolen in Oklahoma. City driven back to Ada. The boy took three tires and wheels from the truck and one from the car and sold them. Police are searching for these, but they have not yet been recovered. Pauls Valley police reported that a 1939 grey Ford coach was stolen there about 6 o'clock this morning and was believed to be heading this way. Local police arc watching the roads for it. A 1936 Goodrich boys red bicycle was taken from in front of the Ada theater last night and a robber broke into a small room adjacent to the garage at the residence of George MacRobcrti and took a .45 army automatic. There were three drunks pick- ed up last night and three oth- ers were picked up for investiga- tion. Police calls for the period front May 10 to May 31 totaled 328. Amonq these were 45 for drunks, 83 complaints, 21 accidents, 10 lost children, 41 investigations, 7 prowlers and three fights. Police Chief Quentin Blake- gives -a warning lo all jaywalkers. Two women have been run over in the last three days while jay- walking, one Jate Tuesday and one Monday night. May Trim Vet Program OKLAHOMA CITY, June that only will be available for veterans ser- vices in Oklahoma from July 1 to December 31 may trim the pro- grim substantially, State Direct- or of Veterans Services Milt Phil- lips announced. Phillips' comment followed a conference with Gov. Robert S. Ken and other state officials. He said the program tentatively agreed upon by veterans' groups here Monday would require at least for the six-month period. With new air routes a traveler, at reasonable rales, will be able to make a through trip nearly three quarters around the globe, from Shanghai to London or Stockholm in less than 48 hours. TH' PESSIMIST Bob Dlanki, Jr. Ain't it funny, tlV trap that ailus catches you is th' one under your nose. Th' proprietor o' th' Blue Front department store an' tlnce clerks collapsed yistcr- diiy afternoon when a lady customer whispered back that she had plenty o' nylons.   

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