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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 4, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             If Ada is worth living in it is worth hoving enough attention paid to its affoirs for every qualified voter to take, part in an election as important as that which is being decided here today. Average Net May I'ald Circulation 8271 .Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 43 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY ADA VOTES TODAY ON CHARTER REVISION Jim Crow Law In New Light Ruling May Hit 18 States; Press Given New Freedom To Criticize Courts WASHINGTON, June Southern states looked to their "Jim Crow" laws today in the light of a supreme court ruling brushing aside Virginia's statute requiring segregation of negroes on interstate buses. The court, in its 6-1 decision, said the Virginia law imposes an undue burden on interstate com- merce and therefore is unconsti- tutional. Dissenting, Justice Burton said that on yesterday's precedent similar laws in nine other south- ern Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Miss- issippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Tex- as and be held invalid. May Affect 18 Slates Likewise, Burton asserted, val- idity of laws of 18 states which prohibit-racial segregation could be challenged since "they differ iharply from lnws on the same subject" in other parts of the country. The 18 were not listed. In two major opinions the tri- bunal: 1. Gave wide latitude to the press in criticizing courts, and; 2. Denied congress the right to single out federal employes and fire them by cutting off their sal- aries. Case Checked lo Congress Justice Reed's majority opinion in the Virginia "Jim Crow" case somewhat obliquely checked the matter to congress by concluding: "It seems clear to us that seating arrangements for the different races in interstate motor travel require a single, uniform rule to promote and protect national travel." While concurring with the ma- jority decision. Justice Frankfur- ter objected to any such single rule. Frankfurter contended that "congress may devise a national policy with due regard to vary- ing interests of different regions." In affirming the right of news- papers to criticize judicial actions, the court unanimously reversed a contempt conviction against the Miami. Fla., Herald and its associ- ate editor, John D. Pennekamp, v.-hich arose out of two editorials and a cartoon published in 1944. Free Discussion Basic "Free discussion of the prob- lems of society is a cardinal prin- ciple of said the court's opinion again written by Reed. "Discussion that follows the termination of a case may be in- adequate to emphasize the dan- ger of public welfare of supposed- ly wrongful judicial conduct. It does not follow that public com- ment of every character upon pending trial or legal proceedings may be as free as similar com- ment after r-omplete disposal of the litigation "Between the extremes there are areas of discussion which an understanding writer will ap- praise in the light of the effect on himself and on the public of creating a clyar and present dan- ger to the fair and orderly judi- cial administration, x x x Free- dom of discussion should be given the widest rnngt- compatible with the essential requirement of the lair and orderly administration." In a concurring opinion Frank- further said "one of the potent means for assuring judges-their independence is a free press" and that criticism "must not feel cramped." Similarly. Justice Murphy said "the freedom of the press x x x includes the right to criticize and discourage, even though the terms be vitriolic, scurrilous or errone- ous." House appiopriations commit- tee members said they were sty- mied by the court's ruling holding as unconstitutional an attempt by congress lo fire three government workers for asserted subversive associations. British Test New Jet Plane hopping the 'Swallow England's latest version of the jet, observers give her T feature is the rearward sloping wings. British Minister of Supply fh-ol'vY, that British military and commercial tviation will be convertedI TeleVoiol an-craft with all the piston engines officially declared outmoded. (NBA Citywide Food Collection Set For June 10 for Needy Peoples College Announces Summer Programs; Some Vets Move In DURANT. June Porter Newman has been erected temporary chairman of a trail or- seeking a local char- ter in the National War Dads or- ganisation. Greater returns foi amount in- News Classified Adf East Central Stale college sum- mer program of professional tal- ent was announced Tuesday by Osoar Parker. Aside from the p'Ofessionul performers there will be programs put on by East Central students. The .paid ap- ucaiances will be as follows: On June 18, the National Music League trio will present a concert consisting of ten numbers: mem- bers of the trio are Rita La pianist, John Di Jann'i, violinist, and Josef Marx, oboist :md director. All are nationally Unown and have played with some; of the world's greatest or- chc-stras. July 1 and 2 brings Dr. Ed- ward Howard Griggs, interna- tionally known philosopher and lecturer, who will make two talks on each day. Anglin Sings Here Apain John Anglin, negro tenor who has appeared here many times before and who is said to be "without question one of the greatest vocal talents of the pres- will appear July 8. Tne Deep River negro quartet will come lo Ada to give a con- cert on July 15. These men are stars of concert, radio, stage and theatre. The- last program named was the appearance Mary Becker, said to be one of Amer- ica's three greatest women violin- ists. She will be here on July ID. Some Housing: Units Bcaciy Concerning the housing units being construclcd at the college, -Vlr Parker said that the furniture was already in some of those at the north and that they would be moved into this afternoon but it will be approximately two wcuks before Hie two at the south arc finished. They also expect to finish work on the baseball diamond and practice football fields today and the sites ;n-c ready for the addi- tional housing units; The Veteraii's Guidarice Center in the science building has been growing by leaps and bounds and is going to have t.o be 'enlarged '.ome more to handle the evcr- incrensing number of vet calls. In case you're wondering what that ditch is they're digging :icross the campus, there is going to be a high pressure water line from Francis avenue to the hous- ing units to furnish them with necessary water. JWEATHERJ .Oklahoma Fair and warmer tonight and Wednesday. FORECAST FOR JUNE 4-7 iiissouri, Kansas, Oklahoma anri tempera- ture trend Thursday and Friday, lollowed by little change Satur- day and. Sunday, except slightly cooler in Nebraska on Thursday; temperatures will average 3-5 de- above seasonal normal ex- ct-pt 8-10 dofrrri's above normal w< stern Nebraska and extreme Kansas; scattered thun- showers Friday, Saturday --ind Sunday with light amount over district. Warren Lewis Now Critically III Warren Lewis, son of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Lewis, has been taken to the home at 223 South Francis. The last few days, how- ever, he has shown no improve- ment and is at the last report worse. Effort is being: made to get the doctor who treated him while he was in the army to fly from I'hicago to render what aid he can, OCTPUT SLIPS PAST WEEK TLJLSA, Oldii., June 4, Daily average crude oil produc- tion slipped back barrels to in the week ending June 1, the Oil and Gas Journal re- ported today. Read the Ada News .W.nnt Ads. y Food in Tin Cons Being Gathered for Emergency Aid to Starving Nations The Emergency Food Collection Drive is now on in Ada and all of the more than residents will; be asked to take part in con- tributing canned foods and col- lecting it for shipment overseas. The date of a city wide drive lias been announced for Monday, June 10. City trucks and trucks borrowed from citizens will be donated for the day to canvas the town. Boy Scouts will be asked to go with the trucks pick up-canned foods from every resident in Ada and the outlying residential areas. Every merchant will have a container in front of his place of business and a Camp Fire girl there to collect food and give in- Food Canning Planned Mrs. Jessie Morgan, county home demonstration agent, an- nounces that if garden food is brought to her and citizens can furnish money for tin cans her clubs over the county will can it. With money promised for cans and donations from farmers in this area, they plan to can at least cans. Older Camp Fire girls will assist in preparing food for canning and in running errands. In the buildings at East Cen- tral there will be placed recep- tacles for food donated by stu- dents. KADA has donated one hour's time for the two week's for pub- licity. On Saturday morning the Ritz theater will have a big show at a. m. with lots of comedy. Admission will be at least one can of food for every child and at least two for every adult. On Friday afternoon the Ada theater will charge the same admission, Shipping Is Free When the food is gathered for Ponloloc county the railroads will ship it free of charge to New York City, whence it will be sent to some of starving people, most .of whom are in China, India, and Poland. The Emergency Food Collec- tion Drive has been organized to assist the UNRRA, which can buy food before it reaches the counters in Ada. By assisting the UNRRA, citizens will help present serious shortages in some districts in the United States. The most needed foods are milk, peanut butter and fish. On- ly tin cans can be accepted and peanut butter only in gallon'tin cans. After these three items come, the vegetables. Ask Food Be Put Ahead of Liquor TARKIO, Mo., June 4, United Presbyterian church's 88th general assembly called 'upon the federal government today to halt the manufacture of all alcoholic beverages except for medical purposes until the end of the world food shortage. The assembly closed yesterday with a resolution, embodying the demand, which was sent to Presi- dent Truman. The delegates also asked Truman to recall Myron C. Taylor, ambassador to Italy and the-president's personal represen- tative to the Pope, on the ground it is unconstitutional for foreign ministers to serve both state and church. The assembly voted to oppose the extension of the selective ser- vice act. LaGuardia Is Told Stele Farmers Would Dump Wheat OKLAHOMAwCITY, -June LaGuardia left for Washington today with the word that' .Oklahoma wheat farmers were ready to dump their grain "on the ground" unless the gov- ernment changes its requisition policy. A committee of 45 farmers told LaGuardia, director general of UNRRA, that under the requisi- tion policy there is no provision to compensate for future price increases. The requisition order requires at least 50 per cent of all wheat delivered at an elevator be sold to the commodity corpor- ation at ceiling prices. Spokesmen for the Hague of Cherokee, Roy Bender of Enid, John Taylor of Mountain View and Fred Percey of Still- that before Okla- homa farmers would comply with the order they would store their grain in "chicken houses. Uarris and dump it on the ground.." They charged the government with giving southwestern wheat farrne.rs a raw deal by giving northern farmers a 30-cent a bushel bonus and higher prices after wheat in this area already had been marketed. LaGuardia told the group at a conference, arranged by Leo W. Smith, assistant director of the production and Marketing admin- istration for Oklahoma, that he their -plea for price protection to congress and Presi- dent Truman. LaGuardia left for Washington last .night after ad- dressing a mass meeting under the auspices of tho famine emer- gency 'committee. Traffic Violations Paying City Well Mayor Has Collected In Fines, With On Traffic 'Counts Senate Takes Up Draff Law Only Agreement Now In Sight Is That Service Men Should Get More Pay By EDWIN B. HAAKINSON WASHINGTON. June The senate gingerly set itself to- day for a new try on deciding the future of the draft, but the only advance agreement was that those in the armed forces should get more money. Senator Gurney floor leader for a proposed extension of selective service until May 1947, told a reporter both house snd senate are "certain to ap- prove a pay increase proposal." Senator Wherry Re- publican whip who wants to sus- pend all inductions, said "a ma- jority of the senate is agreed upon pay increases." And Senator Edwin C. Johnson who wrote the stop- gap extension under which se- lective service is operating until July 1, said the "only argument of pay is az to the amount." Sen. Johnson Puzzled Johnson added that he was 'pu'-izled" why the senate, after weeks planning, suddenly put aside the politically-hot draft legislation in midafternoon yes- terday under agreement to take .'t up. again today. "We could have finished the he said. "There is no reason I why it should not have been finished." Gurney, made a long speech in Large Vote Seen As Interest High Here Change from Three-Commission Form to Council-Man- ager Plan Being Decided by Citizens at Polls Over City "Have you voted That has been the opening of many a conversation -in Ada today, and the inquiry, still being heard, will continue to be timely until the polls close at 7 p. m. and Ada voters have registered their decision on proposed city government revision. Grand Jury Is Adjourned Returns Four Indictments At End of Day and Half Work This Week Pontotoc county's grand jury, which resumed its deliberations Monday morning after being re- cessed from April, adjourned Tuesday and turned its final re- port in to Tal Crawford, district The report states that 38 wit- nesses were interrogated during the four days in April and 10 witnesses this week. The jury is returning four in- dictments. The jury recommends to the 5 By that 7 o'clock hour it is expected that a sizeable vote will have been cast, a' vote which, considering the absence of per- sonal races, will be considered a heavy one. Interest in the proposals for charter revision to switch from the three commission form of government to the council-man- ager form which has become in- creasingly general over the na- tion and in the last fewjrears ov- er Oklahoma, has grown steadily in recent weeks. Indicated Changes Needed Voters in April went heavily in favor of electing a board of freeholders to study the 1912 charter with a view to moderniz- ing it and making it more ef- Navy Prepares Maritime Plan Mobilizing to Operate U. S. Merchant Fleet If Strike Goes on June 15 The proposal submitted to the voters today is the outcome of the board's study, based on. char- ters in use in cities the size and class of Ada, their experience nnd recommendations, as fitted to Ada's situation today and in pros- PC'-t for coming years. favor of continuing selective ser- 1'ne jury recommends to the "lie council-manager form has vice until May 15 of next year, county attorney definite and spe- its basis in a council of five men with draft of 18 and 19 year olds, i cific action after investigating j elected one from'each ward and not excluded from inductions by 'certain matters' in Allen town- I one at demands of a house majority. Senator Vandenberg (R.-Mich.) noted the lack of peace treaties with Austria'and Italy and ob- served that our armed forces in Europe, had been cut to a "very dangerous minimum." Substitute Offered' said he expected strong support for ti substitute he is Dressing jointly with Senator tUvtrcomb (R.-W.Va.) It would continue the selective service i machinery of registration and classification but all inductions large; final authority rests uui icuii iiiuLuurb in town- uut: CIL imai auinomy rests ship relative to law enforcement j in this elected body. by local .authorities and 'particu- Manager Responsible to Council larly the activities and conduct of The council employs a city the constable in the City of Al- ien l The county attorney, Tom D. McKeown, in regard to the four indictments which were returned at..the conclusion of a day and half of wort this week, explain- ed- that the names of those in- dicted can not be announced un- til arrests have been made. The jury expressed, in its fin- al report, appreciation for the in- would be suspended after July i structions 'of Judge Crawford while service pay would be and for assistance given by Owen upped to encourage voluntary en- J. Watts, assistant state attorney listments. Mayor Luke B. Dodcls reported today that a total of in fines has been collected by his office. Of this, was for traf- fic violations which are here list- v One reckless-driving, 37 double parking, three parking by fire plugs, three for turning around in the' center of. the block, five for speeding, two for running stop signs, seven for parking on sidewalks, two for parking in no parking zones, and two for park- ing in alleys. It might be added that more than one of the per- who paid fines were city employees. There were three delinquent stay bonds were collected. There have been 11 cases. of fighting, 13 arrested on charges of dis- turbance, 30 drunks, and four investigations, one for stabbing. Three suspended sentences have been assessed. WASHINGTON, June Charles G. Ross, the White House press secretary, ssid today that Mr. Truman is giving much thought to the selection of a suc- cessor to Edward R. Stettinius who resigned yesterday as XJ. S. delegate to the U. N. security council. available for any emergency voted by the Wherry sp.id. "A pay increase will attract all the volunteers that the army, navy and marines say they need." The house, which approved a nine-month extension of the draft with all inductions suspended for five months and 'teen agers pxompt, at the same time voted a pay increase ranging from 50 per cent for privates in the army and corresponding low ranks in other services, to 10 per cent of all of- ficers. NEWKINGlOR HEREFORD BULLS Texas Bull Sells for Real Silver Domino 44th FORT WORTH, Tex., June 4, Silver Domino 44th sold for yesterday to break all Hereford- sales records at the Silver Crest Hereford dispersion auction on the Dean ranch, 14 miles west of here. A total of 242 Herefords sold for or an average of Fuller -Galloway, textile mill operator and Hereford breeder and owner of the Hills and Dales farms, La Grange, Ga1., "placed the record-making bid of Chino farms, Churchill, Md., purchased the second top animal ID 1 i____ _ general; Tom D. McKeown, coun- iniiT' 111 gcneiui, j-uin u. iviciveown, coun- inis would keep machinery ty attorney: Sheriff Clyde Kais- QlIrtDlG TOP a n v u T.. 1-1? c Real Silver Domino 408th for Greater returns for amount in- uulij vested. Ada News Want Ads. i Oklahoma. er; the Investigalion Division of the department of public safety of Oklahoma, and the bailiff of the grand jury, C. T. Lawson. Mrs. Eva Mae Ragan Is Taken by Death Funeral Wednes- day; Ada Resident Since 1925 Mis. Eva Mae Ragan, 65, died at her home, 514 East Ninth, this morning at o'clock. Fune- ral services will be held Wednes- day at p.m. from Trinity Baptist church, burial in Rose- dale cemetery. Mrs. Ragan was born in Jack- son county, Indiana, and .was in 1897 to Mr. Ragan. They moved to their present ad- in 1925. She was a charier member of Trinity Baptist church and active in the ,T. E. L. class and the W M. S. of that church. j Surviving are Mr. Ragan; two daughters, Jessie Cleo Walker of Ada arid Mrs. Ethel An.-iue Howes -M a y w o o Calif.; n foster daughter Bonita Bevel; two grandsons. OKLAHOMA CITY, June 4 Houston, president of the state committee in charge of the Sooner State Dairy Show to be held in Enid Sept. '3 -to 7, in- clusive, said today interest al- ready evident indicates it will have the largest exhibition, of dairy cattle ever displayed in manager who selects department heads. These and subordinate workers are approved by t h .e council. The manager 'has em- ployment authority, however, and is in turn responsible to the council for administration of the city's affairs. The council can 'fire' a manager if it finds he isn't getting the job done. The proposals also include much more definite and complete requirements for protecting city funds and "for handling of funds and properties. Station KADA expects lo an- nounce final results at p. m. and if they are not all in by that time will make the final figures available later. This is the first charter-change vole since 1932. Opponents of the council-man- ager plan charge dictatorship powers for the manager; those favoring it point to democratic control- through the council, to centralized authority of manage- ment instead of three-way divi- sion of control, to the city's fin- ancial plight which lias no im- provement in sight under the present setup. "Have you voted Reorganize Guard Gen. McLain Assigned By War Department to' Assist In All-Oklahoma Unit OKLAHOMA CITY, June 4, The first step toward reor- ganization of the 45th division as Picket Boat Union pickets took to the water at San Pedro, Calif., with the patrol rfnV? nSht ,foreg.round- boat, manned by members o the CIO fishermen's union, patrolled the commercial fishing fleet displaying large sign that read "These Markets Unfair to Fishermen." Gen. Raymond S. McLain, assign- ed by the war department to aid in the reforming of the guard conferred with Gov. Robert S. Kcrr on matters of policy. McLain said he and GeorgH Ade Davis, stale adjutant gener- al, would work out a plan for reorganization and submit it to the governor for approval later. It is expected that the 45th will be reorganized as an all-Oklaho- ma guard unit, although the numerical designation has'not yet officially been made. Much of the 45th of World War II was built around a nucleous formed by the Oklahoma Nation- al Guard. "We'll have to start from the general said. "There is now no National Guard whatever in the state, and there isn't an officer-or man on the rolls. All we have are 51 armories and we need at least 85." The state guard quota in the national defense plan calls for a strength of men, a num- ber almost triple'that of prewar days. "Lots of interest has been ex- pressed, and we're hopeful that quick re-organization can be car- ried out. "If the old army men are will- ing to aid in the new setup, as they seem to be, we'll be a long way ahead." WASHINGTON, June A hint of new union concessions toward settlement of the threat- ened maritime strike on June 15 came today from President Jos- eph Curran of the CIO's national maritime union. As the navy started mobilizing to run the merchant fleet if nec- vsbary, Curran told reporters that :i ccmpromise 42-hour week pro- posal "is our latest but not our last 'offer." He did not elaborate, but an- other spokesman for the union gave this foliow-up explanation: "We're prepared to avert a strike, we don't want a strike. We're willing to compromise and sign a satisfactory agreement. The point is what is satisfactory." Gap Still Wide Originally the union asked a 10-hour week at sea instead of the present 56 hours, demanding that each ship carry ten relief, workers. Employers said this would be an "insupportable bur- den" making it impossible for American ships-to compete with foreign lines. The new offer cuts the relief crew to 8, but still leaves a wide- gap between the union and employer positions. Federal conciliators are push- ing for settlement of the NMU's .iemands. hoping this would set a pattern for the six other unions wrapped up in the committee for maritime unity T h e conciliation conference took its first peek into the de- mands of west coast seamen to- day behind closed doors, with no results immediately report. Meanwhile the government took preparatory steps lo run the na- tion's merchant ships if mid-June deadline goes by out settlement. Naval stations were ordered to comb their personnel for men with experience in the merchant marine, and also to line up volun- teers among discharged navy men. With time slipping away, ship operators and CIO leaders Harry Bridges and Joe Curran were negotiating day and -night at labor department. Each Side Makes Offers Last night's session did not wind up until 15 minutes after midnight. Then U, S. Concilia- tion Director 'Edgar L. Warren, told newsmen: 1. That a temporary deadlock forced the negotiators to turn a- way momentarily from the of a shorter' work week for sea- men of the CIO National Mari- time union and take up instead one of many side h number of electricians each ship should carry. The snag over hours developed after the union made two new offers and eastern ship operators one. 2. That the Pacific Coast ship- ping industry comes into the ne- gotiations today for the first time, with discussions starting between Pacific ship operators and the Marine Firemen's in- dependent group. Two Orders to Navy The navy moved into the fast- developing picture last night, ad- ding punch to President Truman's promise to keep the ships going even if he had to use the armed forces to do it. Two orders crackled out to naval stations from the office of the secretary of the navy: 1. Commandants were instruct- ed to recruit volunteers from, among discharged navy volunteers who would stand by. to be called to active duly on merchant ships if needed. The order said men with deck, radio and engineering- experience are especially in demand. Two and a half million men liave been re- leased from the navy since last August. No ex-navy man will be called to active duty just volunteers will stand ready to be called if the strike of CIO Sea- men and Dock Workers goes on. TH' PESSIMIST Br Dob Olnnkl, It. OKLAHOMA CITY, June Attorney War r. en Edwards announced he would ask the death penally after he filed charges of robbery with firearms and assault with kill against Williom Peter Samet, 30, New York City. Next t' findin' one good glcve, ther' ain't nothin1 as irritatin' as three good tires. An optimist is anybody who thinks a motorist slop at a slop sign. will   

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