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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 28, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 28, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Members of a house committee are against letting the public know about secret weapon as world would know then and is a reminder that news travels fast by way of the "grape WEATHER Showrrs anil thunderstorms and windy tonight and Wednesday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS Averse Net I'Ald Circulation 8131 Member. Audll Durcau of Circulation 43rd 37 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Glass, Long Time Congressman, Dies Father of Federal Reserve System, Once Member Of Cabinet, Died in Washington Hotel Room WASHINGTON, May Senator Carter Glass of Virginia, long-time member of congress, "father of the federal reserve system" and once a cabinet member, died early today of heart failure. The oldest member of the senate, he was 88 last Jan. 4. Death came in his apartment at the Mayflower hotel, where he lived with his second wife, Mary. Flags on the capital were low- ered to half-staff. Senate leaders planned to adjourn the senate out of respect to Glass immediately after convening at 11 a.m. The senate banking committee, which was scheduled to give fur- ther consideration- io OPA legis- Mrs. FDR Tells U. N. Council Freedom 01 Information Needed By FRANCIS W. CARPENTER NEW YORK, May Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, chair- man of the United Nations com- mission on human rights, told the U.N. economic and social council today that freedom of information was "absolutely necessary." Presenting the report of her commission's work this month, Mrs. Roosevelt said that "only free information of what happens to people forms true public opin- ion." "And only public opinion can enforce a bill of he add- ed. "No bill of rights is any good that can't be enforced." Her commission has proposed a world bill of rights. Mrs. Roosevelt said that the commission on human rights felt that freedom of information in- cluded all types of communica- tions in radio, books, movies, magazines and the press. The report of the sub-commit- tee on the status of women was given by Mrs. Bodil Begtrup of Denmark, chairman. She propos- (Cd that a United Nations confer- ence on the status of 'women be called and that governments not now granting full suffrage to wo- men do so. While the economic and social council received reports of com- mittees, the security council's sub- committee investigating Spain met in a secret session. The sub-committee weighed a challenging suggestion from Spanish republicans that they and unspecified allies might seek to overthrow the Franco regime by force unless the United Na- tions took action against Franco as a threat to world peace. Pecan Tree Spraying Should Start This Week Says Hailey C. H. Hailey, county agent, Monday afternoon pointed out that this is the week for owners of pecan orchards to start ap- plying the firs! spray for the control of the pecan nut case- bearer. J. V. Crablree of the Wilson community reported to the coun- ty agent that he sprayed 147 trees over the weekend, using one of the mixtures recommended by the department. In case a grove is heavily in- fested with casebearers, the sec- ond spray should be applied seven days after the first. Two mixtures, No. 1 or No. 3, are recomendcd at this time of year. If a pecan grower is in- terested in casebearer control a- lone, the No. 1 mixture should be used. If a grower is interested in scab control along with casebear- er control, the No. 3 mixture is preserved. For best results, trees should be sprayed not lat- er than Wednesday of this week. The No. 1 mixture consists of six pounds of lend arsenate, six pounds of hydrntcd lime and throe quarts of summer oil. The No. 3 mixture is composed of six-two-100 Bordeaux, six pounds of lead arsenate and three quarts of summer oil. Complete details and outlined information can be obtained from Ihe county agent's office. ANADARKO. May Teams from Oklahoma City, Sand Springs, Pryor. Alex. Hominy, T e c u m s e h, Kingfisher, Loyal, Apache, Binger and Dallas, Tex- as, have participated in' the 18th annual croquet meet at Anadar- ko. Claude F a r w e 11 and Clyde Howard. Oklahoma, were the "de- fending champions. iWEATHERJ OKLAHOMA Showers and thunderstorms and windy to- night and Wednesday; not .much change in temperature; low tem- peratures tonight G3-73. Forecast For May 28 June 4 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and cooler in Nebraska, Kansas and Oklaho- ma Wednesday and Missouri Thursday, followed by warmer in entire district Friday and Sat- urday, cooler Sundav; tempera- tures will average 3-6 degrees above seasonal normal; showers and thunderstorms Tuesday night and Wednesday and eastern Mis- souri Thursday and again over district on Saturday and over Missouri Sunday: precipitation amount will total moderate to heavy in all lation, also called off its .meeting. Glass was a member of the com- mittee. Glass had been so ill that he was unable to appear in the sen- ate since June, 1942; Because of this a Virginia republican sought unsuccessfully last year -to have his seat declared vacant and a Senator Carter Glass ot Vir- ginia, Congressman; member of Wilson's cabinet, and Senator for many years, ends long public service. special .election called to name a successor. Virgnia courts threw the suit out' and the supreme court declined- to review the case. Secretary of Treasury After winning elections nine times as a member of the house, Glass resigned in 1918 to become President Wilson's secretary of the treasury. He left the cabinet in 1920 to accept appointment as senator and was re-elected five times, most recently to a term expiring in 1049. President Roosevelt offered to make him secretary of the treas- ury again in 1933, but Glass de- clined. It was generally known that his reason was failure of the president-elect to give what the Virginian vwould regard as satis- factory assurance of a "sound- money" policy on the part of the forthcoming new deal adminis- tration. Got Credit for Reserve System Glass received much of the credit for creation of the federal reserve system because of his part in drafting the federal reserve law when he was chairman of the house committee on .banking and currency in 1913. He was bitterly displeased when Roosevelt abandoned the gold standard. He also broke with the administration over the NRA, crop reduction, spending and the 1937 supreme court reorganiza- tion plan. Nevertheless Roosevelt, who fondly him "an unrecon- structed remained his per- sonal friend. Mrs. Aurelia Glass died in 1937. The senator married Mrs. Mary Scott Meade of Amherst, a widow many years his junior, in 1940. I His son Powell, newspaper ex- ecutive of Lynchburg, Va., died last July. X Counfy 4-H Boys Win State Honors Frank Jared of Byng and J. G. Lovelace, Jr., representatives of Pontotoc county in the Oklahoma 4-H Club Rouhd-'up at Stillwater won first place on their team demonstration, C. H. Hailey, county agent, announced early Tuesday afternoon. The title of the demonstration was Pontotoc county's Dairy Im- provement Program. BANKS, SOME OTHEE FIRMS TO CLOSE THURSDAY A'da bank officials reminded the public Tuesday afternoon that both Ada banks will be closed all day Thursday, Memorial Day. A number of Ada business firms have agreed to close for the holiday. Most county offices will also be closed. STAR WINS PRIZE NEW YORK, May Louis Calhern, star of "The Mag- nificent today won the annual award of the Barter the- ater for "the outstanding per- formance by an American actor on the current New York stage." The prize: A ham and an acre of land on a mountain near Ab- ingdon, Va. MONEY TO BUTCHER LONDON, May A grateful woman customer in meat-rationed England left in her will to her Henry Langman, because he waited on her with "a perpetual smile." Chinese Want Settlement Everything Else Expected To Follow Naturally When Manchurian Situation Settled By GRAHAM HOVEY WASHINGTON, May 28, American officials today belittled Foreign Minister Molotov's con- tention that a British-American bloc waged "an offensive against the. Soviet union" at Paris. Secretary of State Byrnes maintained silence for the mo- ment, but others declared private- ly that the United States delega- tion to the foreign ministers' con- ference never had acted "ort pre- vious agreement" with British as Malotov contended in a full-page statement in Pravda yesterday. In fact, they said the -confer- ence record shows frequent dif- ferences between the Americans and British on important issues. Answer To Radio Report There was no-doubt in govern- ment and diplomatic circles here that the Molotov charges repre- sented the official Kremlin answ- er to Byrnes's radio report on the Paris conference last week. Officials noted that .Molotov lifted bits of Byrnes's phrase- ology in giving his own side of the foreign ministers failure to agree on peace treaties! for Ger- many's former European allies. Byrnes said in his radio talk: "We must not try to impose our will on others, but we must make sure -that others do not get the impression they can impose their will on us." Molotov declared: "Certainly, no self-respecting allied state will allow the will of another state to be imposed on it." Byrnes cited the need of an "offensive for peace" and said the United States had started such an "offensive" at Paris. Molotov said the "so-called of- fensive for peace xxxx is some- times merely expressed in a de- sire to 'impose the will of the two' governments (U. S. and Britain) on of a third state." Difficult To Draw Line Byrnes, with Soviet tactics in eastern Europe obviously in mind, said it is difficult to know when the action of a nation could be "ascribed to its quest for security its de'sire to expand." Molotov acknowledged that it is "difficult to draw a line be- tween the desire for security and the desire for but said the hope of the United States for bases in Iceland is not dictat- ed by security." Officials with years of ex- perience in dealing with Russia said they do not believe the Molo- tov statement necessarily consti- tutes a bad omen for resumption of the foreign ministers' meeting in Paris June 15. They said Molotov had only re- affirmed Russia's position on sev- eral major issues in the usual blunt Soviet manner, and noted that it would be unusual for any of the four ministers to talk of concessions or compromise, this far in advance. Students Continue To Enroll, College Beehive of Activity East Central State college was a beehive of activity Tuesday morning as the first classes of the' summer term met. Activity in the halls and the scarcity of parking space was reminiscent of prewar days. Enrollment figures are not as yet available, as many latecom- ers are still in the process of en- rolling. All of the administrative officers were still 'snowed under' taking ca're of re-classifications and ne enrollments. Vets and highschool graduates, now classified as college men and women are swelling the enroll- ment to the largest since 1942, it was estimated by some official observers at the college. Col. (live Murray Gets Special OKLAHOMA CITY, May Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, national selective service director, presented the army's distinguish- ed service medal to Col. Clive E. Murray, Oklahoma's retiring draft director, at ceremonies at the state capitol yesterday. The citation' called attention to Murray's distinguished and meri- torious service in meeting Okla- homa draft calls, and at the same time marshaling essential man- power to enable the state to set unprecedented wartime records in 'industrial and'agricultural pro- duction. Murray was scheduled to leave for Borden general hospital today to receive a physical checkup be- fore quitting his post this month. He expects to return to his du- ties as president of Murray state school of agriculture at Tisho- mirigo about June 1. End of Coal Strike Predicted As Conference Continues TULSA, May C. Berry, Tulsa investor-builder, has announced that Wilson Wyatt, na- tional housing expediter, is ex- pected to visit Tulsa soon in con- nection with price ceilings on new homes. Most Miners Cl "I Still Striking Many Express Hope That Contract Dispute Will Soon Be Settled By The Associated Press Virtually all of the nation's AFL-United Mine Work- ers were still on strike but many expressed hope the con- tract dispute would soon be set- tled. In Washington, Secretary of In- terior J. A. Krug reported that "some had been made; toward agreement with UMW Chief John L. Lewis. The coal fields continued quiet. Approximately members of Miners Union, an independent group, worked. Troops Guard Miners At Madisonville, Ky., fully- equipped armored troops stood guard at the Pond River colliery as the strip mine operated at full capacity. None of the miners were union members, but there was no picketing or disorder. Maj. Robert H. Graham, fifth service command public relations officer, announced at Columbus, Ohio that a company of mobile in- fantry is touring the Kentucky coal mining areas to protect min- ers who want to go to work. West Virginia, the top coal pro- ducing state, had only 30 non- union and strip mines in opera- tion yesterday as most of its. 000 UMW workers failed to show up at the government-operated pits. Pennsylvania had only of its miners working as the U. S. employment service announ- ced it was holding up distribution of jobless compensation checks to some" miners 'pending an indicated appeal by bituminous operators. Some Miners Working The Ohio Coal association re- ported all of its union-manned mines were shutdown. All of Il- linois' UMW members were idle but progressives work- ed under a separate truce extend- ing to June 15. The state-by-state coal picture: Arkansas-Oklahoma Incom- plete reports showed no miners working, Kansas-Missouri All opera- tions shut down, witli an esti- mated to miners idle. Senator Thomas Waiting Action From House Group WASHINGTON, May' 28, Rep. Stigler (D-Okla) plans to ask the house tomorrow to waive its rules to consider and adopt legislation authorizing the return of the Grand River hydro-electric project to Oklahoma state con- trol. He predicted no objection would Tie made to consideration of the bill out of its regular order on the calendar and without house rules committee approval. Unanimous consent is required. Speaker Rayburn (D-Tex.) has agreed to the calling up of tho bill, the told a re- porter, and both majority lead- er McCormack (D-Mass.) and Minority Leader Martin (R-Mass) told him they know of no ob- jection. Senator Thomas who has introduced similar legislation in the senate, said he is waiting for house action. Commerce committee leaders have assured him his bill will receive favorable action as soon as a committee meeting can be called, he said. Besides permitting the interior department to return the hydro- electric plant to the Grand River Dam authority of Oklahoma, the bill authorizes issuance of new bonds and cuts the interest rate on the bonds from four to 2% per cent. Rep Johnson Will Stay in Washington WASHINGTON, May Jed Johnson (D.-Okla.) ccncell-'d today plans to accom- p '.ny Secretary of War Robert Patterson to Oklahoma City and Fort Sill, Okla. The secretary had invited Johnson to go with him by plane to Oklahoma City where he is to. appear before the National Gov- ernors' conference Wednesday and to go on ti Fort Sill that af- tet-noon. Patterson expects to re- main in Fort Sill Thursday. Johnson explained he would be unable to make the trip be- cause ihe senate-amended Case labor bill is scheduled to be tak- en up in the house Wednesday, and legislation involving ter- minal leave pay for veterans is to be taken up later. Red Rocks on Which Peace Conference Foundered ci met Russian ty" with plan for 25.-year, Big Four disarmament of Germany, USSR rejected it seeks immcdi- nt" peocc trco.ly so most occupation troops can leave. USSR sidetracked proposal U. 5. demand! open door" for inferno- tioncl commerce on Danube. Russia holds out against it. U. S. records its opposition to "exclusive political and economic blocs" in Balkans ________________ Russians demand en- tire area, including Trieste and Italians, go to Yugoslavia. Byrnes is firm on dividing area on ethnic basis, with city Italian, but as international port former opposition to awarding these islands to Greece Italy pay her but Byrnes balks, knowing U. S. would have to supply the money. Offers part of Italian fleet, but USSR claims fleet as "booty." Byrnes rejects this concept erences on Italian colonies cased when USSR aban- doned claim to sole trustee- ship of Tripolitanio, U. S. favors UN control Map above spots the most controversial points upon which the Big Four foreign ministers failed to agree at their recent Paris peace treaty failure that Secretary Byrnes laid squarely on Russia's doorstep in his ensuing report to the nation. U. S. Officials Deny Charge Secretary of State Byrnei Silent, Others Declare There Had Been No Pre- Agreement VIOUJ By JOHN RODERICK NANKING, May delegation of the third party democratic league arrived today to open talks with. government and communist leaders designed to bring peace in Manchuria. "We are very hopeful of a peaceful Dr. Carson Chang, league leader, told the Associated Press. "Everything else will follow naturally as soon as the Man- churian situation is out of the way. The communists appear willing to slop fighting." A youth party representative to participate in-the peace parley is expected here tomorrow. Three "Principles" Meantime, the government's Central news agency specified three "principles" it termed pre- requisites to negotiations and Chiang Kai-shek, in Mukden, was reported .to have announced two conditions upon "which he would resume truce talks. I The agency's conditions were! enumerated in an editorial cir- culated by the ministry of infor- mation. It added that the govern- ment could not recognize "dem-' ocratic" local governments estab- lished in Manchuria by the cpm- muhists. The agency's editorial said it "warmly welcomed" resumption of peaceful negotiation's and an- nounced these three conditions: forces should evacuate the Harbin-Tsilsihar- Changchun railway and "launch no more attacks in the northeast conflicts elsewhere should be mediated by executive (truce) headquarters field teams. troops should be reorganized according to the army nationalization plan. Two Conditions Agreed Upon The latter two conditions were agreed upon in the later-violated January truce. said the govern- ment could not recognize the "democratic" local regimes estab- lished by the conimunists in Man- churia. Recognition of commun- ist "fails acomplis" there "would mean recognition of disintegra- tion of Chinese territorial sove- reignty in the northeast. So we don't suggest that the govern- ment give up its non-recognition stand." It added that Manchuria en- joyed the privilege of self-govern- ment under the laws of the coun- try. GUTHRIE, May twenty-third annual .session of the grand assembly of the Order of Rainbow girls of Oklahoma will be held in Guthrie's Scottish Rite Temple June 12, 13, and 14. Grand Worthy Advisor Norma Skinner of Ada will preside. Jobs for Vets In Every State General Checks Employ- ment for Vets to States, Speaker at Governor'! Conference OKLAHOMA CITY, May for seeing that war veterans are trained for future jobs and then finding em- ployment for them was checked directly to the states today by Gen. Omar Bradley, U. S. admin- istrator of veterans' affairs, in an address prepared for delivery to the national conference of gover- nors. While it is federal legislation that has set up the national vet- erans program, it is the direct concern of the state that the plan should bo so administered within' their own borders former service- men will not become "apple sell- the veterans administrator said. He warned that veterans' re- placement centers are useless un- less there are jobs to be given the veterans. Unless there is employ- ment to be had, all the remainder of the veterans program will be- come "empty Bradley said. Devoting much of his attention J.o the on-the-job training pro- grnrn by which veterans received subsistence pay while learning trades nnd vocations through ac- tual experience, Bradley declared that it must not become .a wage subsidy or a bonus. "On-the-job training was plan- ned as an investment in the earn- ing capabilities of the general asserted. "It is to be used to equip the veterans with a mar- ketable job-skill. If he squanders his period of training for the iiv creased income it provides him, the veteran is the one who will suiter the most. "If veterans are induced to frit- ter their time without any lasting results, it is the state which will share their grief. Untrained vet- eran wage earners are candidates for the apple-selling jobs.. They the the ones who will cali most often for their unemployment checks. "We shall not interfere with slates in the exercise of their specific responsibilities. The cs- of reasonable stand- ards in cduation and training is the primary task the state. And yet we're confident that an, appeal of this nature will win warm response in the states. .The veterans there nre yours. The slate of their social nnd economic health will in turn affect your own." Rehabilitation of the veteran and the rebuilding. the Na- tional Guard were on today's pro- gram of the governors. Maj. Gen. B. B. Miltonberger, chief the National Guard bureau, was to discuss setting up of machinery for the reinstatement of state mi- litia on a peace time basis. ISTANBUL, May Halil Aga, who claimed to be 157 years Sunday at the An- atolian village of Sayca. Big Unions Drop Hints Democrats Furnished Food For Thought as Republicans Appear to Be Seizing Situation By .TACK BELL WASHINGTON, May bij; unions, boilim; with political wrath for President Tru- man, dropped some oblique hints today thtit they might switch to another standard bearer, with Henry A. Wallace and Claude Pepper heading the Jiot of ai> ceptables. Capitol Hill, politicians agreed the secretary of rommi'sce and Senalor Pepper (JX-Fla.) are the likeliest beneficiaries jn :my such shift of allegiance, but they wanted more concrete evidence I hut one might be r.i the-mai-'rig. Early To Tell Tho general opinion appeared to be 1ha1 it is too early to tell, w h e t h r the administration r handling of. the strike has ended the 13 y-jir old labor- Democratic coalition.. Howevei, the way'Republicar.'s appear v.'i to be on the sit- uation p; nvided Durno :.-als food tor thought. Lawn noted that former Harold K. Sl.'isscn of Minnesota, and Seiutcir Tafl f't. Ohio.) wire among the first join with the unions in ury'ng congress to go slow in empower- ing the president to draft workers I he president to draft workers striking against the government. Siiisscn, a possible contender for GOP presidential nomination in I labeled the proposal "total- ilarian." While political speculation three of the nation's most powerful labor organiza- lions kept up a heavy drumfire oi criticism on the program Mr. "ruman proposed Saturday for coping with strikes in vital in- dustries during the reconversion period. CIO President Philip Murray was among the latest to blast at Mr. Truman's proposals. In a. telegram to all senators, Murray contended that: "in a mo- niL-nl of wild hysteria an altempl is being made to stampede through congress legislation which has as its sole aim the de- struction of the labor movement of 1his nation. He lashed out not only at Mr. Truman's emeigency strike-con- trol program but also :il the sen- ate version of the house-approved Case bill. Murray's broadside was con- sidered as rough treatment as the CIO chief ever gave any adminis- tration-sponsored proposal, but AFL President William Green was equally vehement, denounc- ing the bill us advocating "slave labor under Fascism." The National Farmers Union .-joined in the fray to assail the emergency program as "naked, opeji and called the sit- uation "a shameful hour in American history." Senator Hill Says Strike Hearing End Encouraging Evidence Wai Fact That Union Attorney! Called to Work on Legal Points WASHINGTON, May Hill deputy administration leader, today predicted an end of the coal strike "within the next 48 hours." Hill told a reporter he had talked with "parties on both sides" and that he understood all "are, in agreement on prin- ciples for settlement." "I feel Hill said, "that unless something very unforeseen occurs, the coal strike will be settled and an- nouncement of the settlement made within the next 48 hours." Hill made his statement short- ly after a conference between John L. Lewis and Secretary.of the Interior Krug looking to- ward a strike settlement was postponed for more than three hours because neither side "was ready" for the next move in tha negotiations. Explanation Offered The explanation of the' post- ponement was offered by Krug's office after a four-man union delegation showed up without Lewis, chief of the United Mina Workers. The UMW group, headed 'by UMW Vice President John J. O Leary, spent 20 minutes in Krug'i office. A spokesman for Krug told re- porters the four union officials talked with Vice Admiral Boa Mprrecll, deputy coal mines ad- ministrator, about "alleged dis- crimination" in the operation of the mines. There was no elaboration of (his but the spokesman said O'- Luary had drawn the admiral's attention to "n couple of inci- donis" in which the miners claim- ed discrimination. The govern- ment has been in control of mines for a week. The meeting between Krug and Lewis was moved from 11 a. m. CEST) to p. m. All -signs pointed to an early 'agreement as thp two ended conference last night. Encouraging- (evidence Encouraging evidence was the fact that union attorneys were called in to work on the legal points of proposals under discus- that barely hap- pens unless the rough draft of a contract has been blocked out. However, the mines still stood idle despite the government's ap- peal for the men to return to work, and the nation's coal sup- ply shrank hourly toward danger point. Lewis and Krug had little to siiy about (he exact status of the negotiations. Krug contended himself yesterday with reporting "some but he added that this progress would keep lawyers for all parties busy; through the night. Lewis checked all questions on progress to Krug, but the husky. UMW chieftain did not look un- happy when he wound up six anJ one half hours of conferences with the interior secretary and other fed-jral officials. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News' Classified Ads, TH' PESSIMIST Bob Blanki, It, Th' trouble with most they hear goes in one ear an" out thc'r mouth. Mighty few fellers ever work themselves t' death, it's whut they do when they ain't at work that allus gits 'em.   

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