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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 24, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 24, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             it's doubtful that many parents would permit their children to bust those noisy firecrackers late at night under THEIR it seems all right for them to do it near other people's Partly cloudy northwest, occa- sional scattered showers cast and south tonight, Saturday and Sun. THE ADA EVENING NEWS Averaijit Net April Paid Circulation 8131 Member. Audit Hurcau of ClrcuUlloo 43rd 3-1 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MAY 24, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY SITUATION IS DARK, STEELHAN CONFESSES Ada Feels Pinch of No Train Services, Industries Worried The nation-wide rail strike lias ticci up passenger transportation ;.nd mail service in addition to pome manufacturers start looking into the future for some uutlot. and by Friday morning nothing had been found that micht "alleviate the situation. "The nationwide rail strike makes it imperative that accep- tance of mail matter of the sec- ond, third and fourth classes be Temporarily suspended and that first class and air mail be restric- ted in weight and Mrs. Mary West, postmaster, said as she- quoted the postmaster gen- eral. Letter Mail Only No second, third and fourth c-la.s? matter is being accepted for mailing and   rcgitration 'books will again be open June 2 for the 20-day period for the pri- mary election of July 2. Combining of two precincts in- to and and addition of a new precinct in northeast Ada will mean registra- tion changes for the voters liv- ing in those areas. Thunder accompanies every flash of lightning, although you may not always hear it. E. C. Honor Awards Given Part of Spring Commence- ment Program; Scholarihip Winners Announced Later Special awards were made to several East Central State college students as part of the com- mencement program of Thursday morning. The 'Clothiers Award- most useful all-around student this year has a joint donor, the Ada Soft Water company, and goes to Thelma Hokey and Bar- bara Hansard, leaders in vocal music and in women's debate. The Blue Lantern Gift Shoppe Award music went to Wanda Jean Page, member of the Con- cert and accompanist on numerous occasions. Yarbo Jewelers Award b e s t athlete went to Buddy York, basketball star who led the Ok- lahoma Collegiate conference in his senior year. Two of the scholarship awards will be announced later. They are for highest grade average in lower and higher college classes, and final tabulation of 'compara- tive grades has riot been com- pleted. More h fold Of Brutality of SS Two Yonks, Wounded Comrade Shot in Cold Blood from Rear By CYNTHIA LOWRY DACHAU, May 24, Two American soldiers and the wounded comrade they were car- rying on a stretcher weje shot in cold blood from the rear during the Battle of the Bulge, a 20- ,year-old former elite guard pri- vate said in a statement read to- day in the Malmedy trials here. The private, Gus'tav A. Spren- ger, said he shot and killed the wounded American. The recounting of the slayinas concluded the 16-page statement by Sprenger, who told. yesterday of shooting U. S: war prisoners at the Malmedy crossroads, where 71 bodies were found later. Sprenger said another nazi "fired into the two men who were carrying the stretcher." Af- ter they fell to the ground "I .then shot the wounded American soldier on the stretcher suffering with a bad wound in the right upper he added. The former Drivate is one of 74 SS officers and men charged with slaying and torturing American war prisoners and Bel- gian civilians. IK Years Ago President May Ask Authority Considers Appeal to Con- gress for Power to Prevent More Nationwide Strikes WASHINGTON, May 24. Senator Byrd (D-Va.) said after a White House, call today that President Truman is considering an appeal to a joint session of congress for .additional authority to prevent further nationwide strikes. .Byrd said he had strongly urg- ed Mr. Truman -to before con- gress "if he needs additional pow- er or legislation to punish those who have been guilty of any in- fraction of the laws and to pre- vent strikes." The president, Byrd told White House reporters, said he is giving the matter full consideration. Country's Ready "My judgement is that if the railroad strike is not settled-to- day the nrcsident should come before congress Byrd added. "The country is strongly behind him in any move he may make to settle this crisis and now is the time for action." Byrd called at the White House to witness the signing of a fed- eral pay raise bill and took the occasion to appeal to Mr. Tru- man. Byrd was asked when the pres- ident should go up, and replied "the sooner the better." "If the strike is not settled to- day, he should come up tomorrow or even tonight." May Limit Debate Meanwhile, a move to limit further senate debate on labor legislation gained ground behind cloakroom reports that numerous senators will stay away from the chamber when the roll is called at 1 p. m. (EST) tomorrow. A vote is scheduled for that hour on a debate-limiting "clo- rule, which can be applied only by a two-thirds majority of senators present. Of course there must be a quorum, of at least 49 senators. If only 51 should be on hand, tomorrow afternoon for instance, affirmative votes of 34 would put the rule into effect. Twenty- seven members signed the cloturs Petition presented last night 'by enator Knowland Boy Scout Drive Doing Well in Its Earliest Stages Ground work for the annual Boy Scout finance drive is com- ing along as planned, .according to Harry Lundgaard, general chairman. Lundgaard is pleased with the response so far as to contributions and the willingness of men to serve on teams to make the general drive next Tuesday. Scott Baublits, chairman of general solicitations, reports that the captains appointed are having no difficulty in securing men to work on their groups. These groups will be finished today and will be ready for the Early Bird Breakfast at the Aldridge hotel on' Tuesday morning of next week. Following the breakfast the teams will canvass the entire town. A feature of the breakfast will be a free shave to the team that has all its members at the Ald- ridge first. American hunters killed ducks in 1943, but also wounded they did not get, according to estimates. No Meeting Of Lewis' Board Latest Move Stalls Nego- tiations Until 'Clarifica- tion' of Miners' Status Crippling Effects of Railroad Tie-Up Spread Paralysis Over U.S. Transportation, Industry By The Associated Tress Thousands of freight cars, over 500 of them filled with perishable food, stood in Kansas City's rail Cirri ElfAflff ft! yards today and workers made Ellvll) Vl frantic efforts- to keep the food iced to 'save as much as possible. Meanwhile, six passenger trams departed and three arrived during the morning and early afternoon at Kansas City's union station, the locomotives manned by supervis- ory officials who formerly were engineers. The normal traffic in that period is 52 trains. Three of the departures were on the Santa Fe, two on the Rock Island and one on the Kansas City Southern. Wheat Causes Worry, Rail officials indicated that not i a freight car was moving in the southwest and expressed concern j for the millions of acres of wheat j in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. I The union policy committee un- animously authorized the truce and would have to ratify any new contract presumably, any fur- ther extension of the truce. Assails Act The Smith-Connally act pro- hibits any pe'rson from inciting a strike or conspiring to strike in a government-seized mine. Lewis' notice at union quarters said: "Notice to members, policy committee, UMWA: "Government seizure of mines invokes the punitive provisions of the infamous Smith Connally slave statute. "This imperils legally the liber- ty of individual members of the union. Until further clarification, Nation Reels From Rail Union Strike Industries Hard Hit, Food Spokesmen Fear Wide- spread Suffering If Continues By The Assocl.'itL-d J'rcss The nation reeled today from the first effects of the greatest strike in railroad history. From coast to coast and from situation would re- week if the strike border to border rail transporta- tion was at a virtual standstill. Industries, large and small, were threatened with shutdowns or sharp curtailment in produc- tion. Fears were expressed that a serious food sult within continues. The government, struggling to bring order out of the near chao- tic conditions in the movement of freight, mail and passengers, planned new negotiating confer- ences in attempts to effect settle- ment the dispute between the carriers and two rail brother- hoods. Lengthy sessions' last ni_ght shed no hope for an immediate agreement on the disputed issues of wages and changes in working Rail Strike At A Glance By The Associated Press On strike: members of the Brotherhoods of Locomotive Engineers and Railway Trainmen, with nearly all of the members of 18 other rail, unions made idle. First effects: first country- wide r..il strike since 1022 threa- tens, knockout blow to nation's industry; acute food situation feare'd; millions left stranded; other millions in big cities con- fronted with problem of getting to work. Negotiations: Two rail union presidents formally reject presi- dent Truman's compromise pro- posal of cents an hour wago increase, which was accepted by i II) other rail brotherhoods nnd I the carriers; government officials call further conferences in at- tempt to effect settlement of. dis- pute over wages and changes in working rules. Transportation: Some trains operate, manned by supervisory employes but Association of American Railroads said i.ieup "pretty close to 100 per cent." Priorities governed movement passengers and freight by air, highway and water as army and navy muster-pilots and planes in rules. The Ticup Is Speedy tieup of service on 384 railroads ensued quickly after 4 there will be no meeting of the j p.in. local standard lime yester- nalional policy committee. Lew- i day as engineers and is." trainmen left their jobs in obc- Secretary of Interior Krug, fed- dience to a strike call of last eral boss of the. government-seiz- ed mines, met coal operators ear- ly in morning, presumably to April 29. Made idle by the walk- out were most of the members of the 18 other rail present the contract terms the j brotherhoods not included in the government proposed to John L. strike call. United Mine Workers. Morre'll In Charge Krug left before the confer- ence ended in order to attend a cabinet meeting at the White House. The mine owners con- tinued their 'disc u's s i o n with Krug's deputy, Vice Admiral Ben Moreell. In the operators group were Charles O'Neill, head of the Ap- palachian operators; E. R. Burke, leader of Southern operators; Ez- ra Van Horn, chairman the bituminous wage conference; Kenneth Spencer, representing A few trains operated and were manned by supervisory em- ployes. But the Association of American Railroads said the tie- up was "pretty close to 100 pel- cent." The only class one carrier not affected by the walkout was the Illinois Central, which was taken over by the government last August. Grave predictions came a few hours after the strike became ef- fective. A brownout in eastern and midwestern coal producing areas will be ordered next week, the Western operators- George Camp- Civilian Production Administra- bell of the Illinois operators; and tion said, if the tieup continued Harry Moses, spokesman for the soft operators of "captive mines." Even if the government suc- ceeds in obtaining a settlement before a strike truce ex- pires tomorrow, the rail walkout offered a second threat to put the industry down for the count. STORM HITS PANAMA PANAMA, Okla., May 24, Considerable damage was caused yesterday when a small tornado swept in to blow several houses off their foundations, cave in roofs and knock over trees. No one was reported injured in this small eastern Oklahoma town. TULSA, Okla., May 24, The .second meeting of the Okla- homa highway development as- sociation will be held, at Oklaho- ma City. June 10 instead of May I "day" very" cent "of the Steel Mills Closing The shutdown of the country's soft coal mines, now under fed- eral control and a strike of 000 miners still unsettled, appear- ed imminent. Steel mills were closing and others were threat- ened with an early closing. Thou- "How about a poppy, That's what you'll hear today and Saturday as the Rainbow Girls, Campfire Girls and members of the American Legion and VFW auxiliaries begin an all-out two day campaign on Poppy Week, the .first peace-time sale of pop- pies since the Great War. As you receive your poppy, you will contribute some amount of money to the workers which will go to welfare and rehabilita- tion funds. All of the persons dis- tributing the poppies have volun- teered their services for the en- (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Today, Saturday's Poppy Sales Aid Disabled Veterans The sale of "Buddy Poppies" was. going as good, if not better than expected Friday morning, when members of the American Legion and VFW and their Aux- iliaries in addition to volunteer workers started an extensive drive for selling poppies local- ly- It was no task for the workers to sell poppies, in fact, people were going to those selling pop- pies asking for one or more. The minimum price charged for poppies is 10 cents, but thers is no limit to the maximum price that might be paid. More than once during the morning sales period, men paid as high as for one ippy. Men have been reminded that it would be suitable to purchass corsages made from- poppies for any occasion. All of the poppies sold in Ada were made by the veterans now located at Muskogee General Hospital. The sale of these pop- pies has been going on through- out this entire week, following I a proclamation by Mayor Luke j B. Dodds that this was to be j Poppy Week. The local group is part of a nation-wide army of over 000 unpaid .volunteers, who are working throughout the nation on the Poppy Days. The quota here is the need is much greater because of the increase in service men disabled during the second great war. 28, the date originally chosen, President Early R, Cass announc- ed today. money goes to the benefit of dis- i (Continued on Page 2, Column 4) Thought Baby Ugly, Abandons'Him NEW YORK, May If you're waiting for a train to- day, ponder this: Exactly 116 years ago today on- May 24, 1830 passengers rode the first railroad built in the United Stales for general trans- portation purposes. The line, built by the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, was opened between Baltimore and Ellicott's Mills, Md. But passengers needed a horse on that day too. The first train was horse-drawn. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. James Ashe, left, feeds his 10-day-old -son who was abandoned in a Chicago hospital by its mother, Mrs. Marjorie Ashe, right, who left a note saying she thought their baby ugly. Ashe charlercd a plane, after his wife was located in Burlington, Iowa, and brought her back to Chicago and con- vinced her that the baby was.not TclephotoJ. Kansas Flying Farmers Convene HUTCHINSON, Kas., May 24, perfect flying weather, more than 200 fanners dropped their li-'H airplanes onto Hulch- inson's Municipal airport this morning as they convened for the organization session of the Kan- sas flying farmers club. Johnson county, with 28 rural pilots registered, took an early lead in registration, and imme- diately began promoting Alfred Ward, prominent rancher, for president of the new organiza- tion. Other planes were arriving throughout the morning as far- mers prepared for an aerial par- ade of light plane models and army and navy air shows this afternoon. Truman (alls Top Advisors; Mediator Sees No Quick End President Silent, May Go To People With Broadcast On Situation WASHINGTON. May "dark" outlook for any quick settlement of. the railroad strike was reported today by Dr. John R. Steelman, top government me- diator. "The situation looks Steeiman said in a message re- layed to reporters between meet- ings with the carrier und union representatives. The statement was brought out by Cincir. Joseph L. Miller, Stool- man's assistant. UK he li.-ft u moot- ing with the chiefs of the Imm- inent and ciiKinoers brotherhoods to confer again lit 2 p.m. (EST) with representatives of the car- riers. Top Advisers Culled With the country tic-d up by a nationwide r a i 1 w a y walkout, President Truman today called a 3 p.m. EST meeting at the While House of top cabinet and labor advisers to canvass "the whole strike situation." Press Secretary Charles G. Ross, who made the announce- ment, so described the meeting's purpose when asked whether it concerned the coal or rail crisis. A presidential mediator worked feverishly today to bring the car- riers and striking workers into an agreement for ending the para- lyzing mil strike. Cabinet Talks Strike A growing urgency, fed by ac- cumulating reports of impending food shortages and vast unem- ployment, was reflected also in. two White House developments: 1. Postmoster General Robert L. Hannegan told reporters after a 90-minute cabinet mooting: "We discussed strikes, nothing but strikes and we did so emphatical- ly nnd intensely." 2. Senator Byrd (D-Va) said after a call on President Truman that the chief executive is con- sidering an appeal to congress for additional authority to prevent further nationwide strikes. John R. Steelman, presidential labor adviser, talked with loaders of the striking trainmen and en- gineers and then met representa- tives of the carriers as negotia- tions were formally resumed in. a downtown hotel after a fruit- less session at the White House yesterday. Congress reacted still further. While the senate debated labor disputes legislation, the house la- ordered an investi- gation of industrial unrest. Scattered Rains Fall Over Slate By The Aiiociottrf Scattered rains fell in Oklaho- ma overnight with Sallisaw re- ceiving the heaviest fall of 1.38 inches. The federal weather bureau predicted no more rain would fall during the next 24 hours. Official rainfall reports includ- ed Miami .10: Muskogec .37; Pryor .08; Sallisaw 1.38; Tulsa .05; Vinita .13; Ada .03; Ardmonj ,10; Durant .34 and McAlcstcr .57. TWO Rail Strikes WASHINGTON, May 24, Just for the record: there are two railroad strikes instead of one. On July 1922, rail- road shopmen quit their jobs. They stayed out a long time, then began to drift back to the shops. But, says the Association of American Railroads, they never got around to calling off the strike. Officially, it still is on. ------------jf------------ The mineral jade exists in all colors, the amount of iron present being the determining factor. ALVA, May Tho Alya Review-Courier, participating in a state traffic safety program lias distributed green stickers pledg- ing safe driv'ng to Alva motorists. TH' PESSIMIST I B7 Dob Gran'pa Wheeler has cut out sweets, meats an' car rides in 'n effort I' bo here when television gits goin', so he can sec IK stockin' ads. Pay day is when your wife will inaet you more than half way.   

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