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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 13, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 13, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             A womon inquired how many packages she could buy of a irew supply of standard washing powder; told all of it if she'd pay for it, she remarked, "Well, in that case, one packag. will do.' Mostly cloutly, occasional showers and thunder storms after- noon, tonight and Tuesday THE ADA EVENING NEWS Net April 1'itld ClrcuUtloc 8131 Member. Audit iiureiu of Circulation 43rd 24 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, MAY 13; FIVE CENTS THE COPY Many Fine Entries In Big Dairy Show Six-Breed Show Tuesday, Fitting and Grooming Demon-' stration Today; Calves Bought This Month in Wisconsin On Display All of the barns at the Fairgrounds were filled to ca- pacity early Monday afternoon and animals were still ar- riving to take part in the Fifth Annual South-Central Okla- homa Dairy show, which started Monday morning and ends Tuesday afternoon. 5 The show here is the top show in the state as Jar as the number of entries are concerned. The 115 head of registered dairy stock brought here from Wisconsin in- creased the number. More than 250 animals are expected to take part in the show before it ends. Plane Crash Takes 28 Lives Bull On Way To Africa Fine Animal Leaves Laxy D Ranch in Hereford Heaven for Trip to South- Rhodesia ern Jack Smith, manager of the Lazy D Ranch, recently started a S4.000 bull from the Lazy D herd to Southern Rhodesia, South Africa. A bull was purchased at the January sale at the Lazy D for S2.500, but R. J. Kinzer, secretary of the American Hereford Asso ciation. telegraphed Arch Blac in South Africa that there was better bull for and Blac ordered the better animal. The bull was delivered to Nev Orleans, La., where it was pu on a boat for the 28 day trip t its home. After the. bull arrives, it wi! go through a 30 day quarantin period before being permitted t be removed to the Arch Blac: ranch. Jack Smith said that doesn't have a large herd in South Africa, but that he wnnlcc to improve the blood lines tha he already has on the ranch. Deathless Weekend Since Mid-March But Crashes Injure 29 Per- sons, of Whom Nine Are Seriously Hurt By The Axsoclated Press No one was killed in traffic ac- sidents in Oklahoma over the weekend, the state highway pat- rol reported today. It was the first deathless Week- end on the highways since the middle of March. Fatalities this month now total 15. compared to 12 for the same period a year ago. Deaths for the year total 184, compared to 123 at this time in 1945. Despite the deathless weekend, 29 persons were injured, nine ser- iously, in crashes at Shawnec, Antlers and Englctown. The patrol said the seriously injured were: Ed Barcom, 40, Antlers. Albert Mosser, 64, Antlers. Thomas Jefferson Stockton, 59, Sopher. Mrs. Addie Stockton 52, Soper. Mrs. Sudie Stephens, 74, Soper. Nettie Jackson (age unknown) Antlers. W. S. Mooneham. 20, Harrah. Walter Scott Mooneham, G3, Harrah. Mrs. Mary Mooneham, 65, Har- rah. Walter Harrison Radio Commentator OKLAHOMA CITY, May 13, Ui Walter M. Harrison, who served for 30 years as managing editor of the Oklahoma City Ok- lahoman and Times, announced today he was entering the radio field as a commentator. Harrison said his first program would be broadcast at p. m. (central standard time) tonight over radio station KOMA, Okla- homa City. Harrison served during World War Two as a lieutenant colonel diary Jersey, Milking Shorthorn, Holstein, Guernsey, Brown Swiss and Ayshire breeds of dairy an- imals are entered in the state's largest dairy show. Judges of the show. (nclude Bernard Marquardt, Milking Shorthorn breeder from Melton Junction, Wis.; P. C. dairy department of Oklahoma A. and M. C9llcge, and J. W. Boehr, extension dairyman from Stillwater. The show here includes entries from Murray, Okfuskee, Garvin, Johnston, Hughes, Po'ntotoc, S e m i n o 1 e and Pottawatomie counties. A fitting and grooming school was conducted Monday starting at 10 a.m. and continued through the remainder of the days. Boys attending the schools groomed their animals before judges got a chance to see them Tuesday. Most of the boys receiving calves through the Chamber of Commerce dairy program were on hand Monday morning to see their animals for the Hoover Will Go To South Africa For Food Crisis Aid British Leader in This Na- tion for Visit Denies Ask- ing Meat, Fats Ration Smoldering wreckage of one of the PB4Y navy planes which collided in mid-air at Munson Fla maneuvers in which the PB4Ys were dived upon by a Hellcat fighter plane causing the to collide and crash to the ground, costing the lives of 28 navy Telephoto) Operators Agree To Holiday Pay Demand Breakdown In India Meeting But British Still Hopeful Of Working Out Independ- for India Jap Defense Insists That Nips Hereford Heaven To Surrendered Conditionally But Be Scene of Tour Prosecution Says Claim Absurd On June 7 and 8 WASHINGTON, May 13, The White House 'said today that Herbert Hoover had accepted an invitation to go to South America as President. Truman's food am- bassador to tnlist the support of those countries in the food crisis. Press Secretary Charles G. Ross said Mr. Truman compli- nented Hoover at the conference today on his splendid job so far, and asked him to go to South America at his convience as "food ambassador." Hoover, Ross said, accepted and is going within the next few War Crimes Attorney Argues Japan Didn't Surrender Un- conditionally, Doesn't Have to Obey Every Allied Command By DUANE HENNESSY TOKYO, May that Japan did not surrender unconditionally and does not have to obey every Allied command 'was presented today to the ,Far East Mili- tary' Tribunal by the chief defense counsel for Japan's ma- jor war criminals. Attorney Ichiro Kiyose's chal- lenge that the court lacks auth- ority to try the 28 defendants on 55 counts was taken under ad- visement as the tribunal adjourn- ed until Tuesday morning. The' allies'' chief: prosecutor, Joseph B. Keenany-labeled-- Ki- yose's argument as the "height of absurdity" and offered document weeks. The former president simul- .aneously told a conference hat the world grain deficit could bo largely overcome if surplus- producing nations adopt "further igorous conservation measures." Hoover Silent. On Rationing Talking after his meeting with he president, Hoover refused to Rains and (hilly Temperatures Not Over (or State There isn't much rain .falling at a time but it is being so distri- buted that it is keeping condi- tions generally muddy and dis- agreeable. Add that to the swing: back to chill temperatures and the result is much' discomfort and a long- ing for some of that clear, al- most-hot weather that prevailed here less than a week ago.. The rainfall of late Sunday af- ternoon and early night reached .17 of an inch here, according to W. E. observer. The temperatures ranged from Sunday's cool 68 degree maxi- mum to a low of 41 degrees dur- ing the night. The Associated Press reports a forecast of more moisture and of rising temperatures. Light rains and occasional thunderstorms will accompany ary evidence that Japan's surren- der was "utterly without condi- tion." Claims Agreement Kyos.e said that in giving the tri- bunal jurisdiction over crimes against peace and crimes against humanity "General MacArthur is exercising authority which he does not possess and the Japanese Members of the Hereford Hea- ven association met Sunday af- ternoon at the Diamond C Ranch, owned by Dr. Ralph Clark of Oklahoma City, for a fish dinner and a business session. One of the principal subjects discussed was the First Annual Hereford Heaven tour, June 7 and 8. Heretofore, the tour of Here- ford Heaven has been' in connec- tion with Oklahoma Hereford As- sociation tour, but members of the Hereford Heaven Association voted a couple of months ago at the annual meeting of the organ- ization to hold a tour separate from the state, tour. Many Plan To Attend More than persons are expected to attend- -the two' day tour of Hereford ranches in this area. Many of those attending Jack Turner's sale in Texas will return to this area to make the tour. A number of reservations have been made at local hotels for persons who are planning to at- tend the big event. A total of 12 ranches will be visited. Those visiting every ranch des- ignated on the tour will be at McMakin's Lazy K, Moss Patter- order. Japan's top statesmen, Kiyose people are not bound to obey that "iciviaKin's Moss Patter- o-der" sons Lazv s Ranch, Bill Likins Flying L Kanch, the J. K. Powell ranch, Dr. T. G. Wails Ranch, Col vert Ranch, Turner Ranch. The second day of the tour will take visitors to the Lester-Blair ranch, L. P. Carpenter ranch, the Buxton Horse Shoe ranch, W. E. ay whether" he believed the I slowly rising temperatures in the and recently published a of his war clays. PRESIDENT MAY USE FDR's RELAXATION WASHINGTON, May 13, President Truman may make use of Franklin D. Roosevelt's wooded retreat "Shangri -'La" from time to time during the summer, Press Secretary Charles G. Ross said today. The president, Mrs. Truman, their daughter Margaret, and Mrs. David Wallace', Mrs. Tru- man's mother, had lunch yester- day at the rustic spot in the Cat- octin mountains near Thurmonl, Md., it was the president's first trip there. WEATHER cloudy, oc- casional showers and thunder storms this afternoon, tonight and Tuesday: locally severe thunder storms and heavy precipitation central and east tonight and Tues- day: little change in temperature; lowest temperatures tonight mid- dle to upper 50'g. urplus countries, including the Jnited States, should establish ood rationing to help. He wished, Hoover said, to "be llowed to keep out of the domes- ic controversy" over rationing. Herbert Morrison, president of e British council, also discussed be food situation with the presi- ent. To reporters he described s "without foundation" a pub- shed report that he was asking Ir. Truman to ration meats and ats in the United States, Mor- ison said: "Any idea of me telling the Americans w.hat they are going to auon and what they are not go- ng to ration is not on ray genda." Talked Whole Situation (In London, the political .cor- respondent for the world, quoting the "higher reported that Morrison would ask the president to ration meats and fats in the United States.) Morrison said he discussed "the whole famine situation" with the president, and added: "The president is fully posses- sed of the facts and urgencies of the matter." 'We are both equally determin- ed to take necessary steps. We compared notes on the Ameri- can and points of view. My own impression is that their approach is not dissimilar." FUNDS APPROPRIATED FOR CHILLOCCO INDIAN SCHOOL WASHINGTON, May 13, A appropriation has been approved by the house for opera- tion; maintenance and salaries of the Chillocco, Okla., Indian boarding school for the year be- ginning next July 1. The amount is contained in the interior, department appropria- tions bill now being debated in the house. Appropriations committee clerks told a reporter the amount is slightly more than the 000 given the school for the cur- rent year. The increase, they said, is for higher salaries in line with raises allowed other federal employes. No funds are included for new buildings or additions; eastern half of the state during the next 24 hours, the federal weather bureau predicted today. Southerly, winds are expected to bring temperatures and the rain. Ardmore, with '.77 inches of rain during the past 24 hours, re- ported the state's heaviest fall. Other moisture reports included McAlester .28, and Oklahoma City .11. Guymon, in the panhandle, re- ported both temperature ex- tremes, a high of 74 Sunday and a low of 45 early today. said, agreed to surrender in the belief they would not be prose- cuted as war criminals. The attorney declared that in the surrender last September Ja- pan recognized that she would obey orders and directives of the allied powers but only those in accordance with ,the Potsdam declaration. Thus he challenged the tribun- al's authority to try the defen- dants on charges of crimes against peace and'crimes against human- which make up a large part of the indictment a- gainst the defeated leaders. Keenan Replies Chief Prosecutor Keenan de- ence By PRESTON GROVER India, May British cabinet mission, ad- mitting failure of an eight-day conference with Moslem and Hin- du leaders on independence for India, made it plain today that it still had hopes of solving the In- dian problem. The conference ended in com- plete breakdown yesterday, thus dealing a severe blow to the hop- es of those who had expected a quick transition from British control to Indian self-govern- ment. Two communiques issued after the jointly by the cabinet mission1, the Moslem league and the congress party; the other by the cabinet mission no reason for col- lapse of the negotiations. It seemed apparent, however, that the conference had founder- ed on demands of the Moslem league for an independent Mos- lem state These de- mands have been bitterly oppos- ed by the congress party, .which favors an India unified at. least insofar as foreign affairs, defense and communications are concern- ed. _ The communique by the mis- sion snid the conference had not "led to any agreed plan between (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) Draft Order Is Expected Truman May Order Exten- sion, Without If Congress Fails to Act WASHINGTON, May military committee sources predicted today President Truman will issue an executive order tomorrow continuing the selective service organization, without inductions, if congress fails to extend the draft law ex- piring at midnight Wednesday. The purpose of the order, which they said was prepared by national selective service head- quarters, would be to prevent collapse of the selective service machinery. The president they said, to make the selective service organization a part of the execu- tive office under recently enacted reorganization legislation. They' declined to be quoted directly. The house may act late today on a senate measure extending the draft law until. July 1. Unless congress or the presi- dent acts, committee members said, local draft boards will go out of existence at midnight May 15 and the machinery for resum- ing inductions later will have been junked. Even an executive order, they said, will not clarify the status of some conscientious ob- jectors now held in selective ser- vice camps. An army spokesman expressed the, opinion that since the ob- Do Not Admit Basic Policy Say It to Clear Way For Real Negotiations to SettU Wage Dispute (Continued on Page 2 Column 5) Will Hang 58 (or Their Part In Extermination Camp Horror Southern AFL Out For Vote Strength, Also Wire Cutter ASHEVILLE, N. C., May AFL leaders set out today to destroy the one- party system in the south, but the one party that interested them immediately was the party who cut William Green off the air. The great wire-slashing mys- puzzle of the "dead" NBC microphone into which the Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads Couple Held Over Driving Stolen Car i Auto Stolen from Car' Lot in Oklahoma City. Wayne Gower and Earl Farrell, who list their home as' Valliant but who have been working in Oklahoma City for the past sev- eral weeks, are being held by the city police force after they were found to be driving a stolen car. The pair was arrested last Thursday on charges of reckless driving and placed in city jail. Members of the police force made an investigation through High- way Patrol headquarters' in Oklahoma Ctiy and found that the car did not belong to either of the fellows. Police checked the license on the car to a man in the southern aart of Pontotoc county, but the fellow said that his 1935 Chevro- .et was not missing.' During the time that the police were making the investigation, the two fellows were held for in- vestigation., 'City police learned Monday morning that the 1941 Ford driv- en by the pair was stolen May 2 from a car lot in Oklahoma City. Police officials at Oklahoma City told -local authorities that they would come after the pair Monday afternoon. LITTLE ROCK, May Continuance of the office of price administration en a 'modified form, was recommended here to-- day by F. C. Bacon of Tulsa, Okla., director of the national restaurant association. dared that examination of Japan' es.e communications delivered to the Swiss government at the time of surrender would show it was without condition. Keenan turned to the surren- der ultimatum prepared by the allies, at the Potsdam conference last July for further support for his argument. From paragraph 13, he read: "We call upon the government of Japan to proclaim now the un- conditional surrender of all Japanese armed forces...." And from paragraph six: "There must be eliminated for all time the authority and in- fluence of those who have de- ceived and misled the people of Japan into embarking on world conquest...." Kiyose took a different view of the Potsdam declaration. Under its terms, he said, the allies could prosecute all war criminals guilty of violating ac- cepted laws and customs of war. But he argued that no provision was made for charges included in the present indictment which hold- the defendants responsible for inciting war and for mis- treatment of allied peoples. r "The' Potsdam declaration not only binds Japan, but. binds the the white-haired counsel declared.' "We in Japan at no time expected that it would ba extended to crimes against peace and charges against important statesmen, diplomats and other leaders." Says Agreement Was "Offer" Germany's surrender was wholly unconditional, Kiyosa said, but the Potsdam agreement presented an offer" to Japan. "It is this that was accepted and it is this that the allies must he contended.- Kiyose told the he objection of he could see no reason why.theques- ;ion-of Japanese aggression in Manchuria should be covered in he indictment. He said several countries had recognized the state of Manchukuo, set up there by he Japanese. Harvey ranch and finish the tour i AFL' president, shouted strenu- Saturday afternoon at the Lazy j Lunch Points Decided On Lunch will be served at the Flying L ranch Friday at noon and lunch Saturday will be at the Horse Shoe ranch. Friday night at the half-way mark of the tour, the Sulphur Chamber of Commerce will furnish ah enter- tainment program. A. L. Burleson, whose ranch is located near Ott Bur- nett, whose Hereford farm is near Pontotoc, were accepted as new members in the organization at the Sunday meeting. Those attending were treated to all the fish they could .eat, in torium was full of people. There addition to all the trimmings. Cornbread, butter and molasses were served as a dessert for 15 minutes Saturday these new de- velopments: 1. An Asheville' AFL leader who asked to remain unidentified offered a reward for capture of the wire-slasher. 2. Asheville police were trying to locate all the electricians who had anything to do with install- ing the wires, to discover whether they saw any suspicious charac- ters in the basement of the city auditorium, where the slashing occurred. 3. Police Chief C. W. Dermid told a reporter: "We have nothing on which to proceed. The audi- WASHINGTON, May coal operators today agreed to pay in back holiday pay claimed by John L. Lewis miners, clearing the way for discussion of key issues in the deadlocked negotiations. In a statement the operators said that in agreeing td make the payment the action "is not to be construed as a recognition in any way of any merit in the demand made, nor as establishing a pre- cedent for future action." Now Make Contract "The sole purpose is to open the way for real they said. "The operators now call upon the union to proceed imme- diately to negotiate a contract." Lewis' claim involved overtime payment he said was due to those workers who worked a full week during the weeks in which Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christ mas and New Year holidays occurred. By HAROLD W. WARD WASHINGTON, May Truman reviewed the soft coal situation with cong- ressional leaders today as the op- erators interrupted negotiations with John L. Lewis to confer pri- vately on the miners' demnnd for in back holiday pay. House Democratic Lender Me- McCormack (Mass.) told report- ers after the weekly legislative conference at the White House that the coal situation had been canvassed in "a very general way." "Everybody he added. "that the negotiators will get down to an agreement." No progress was reported by either side after a.brief session' between the United Mine Work- ers and operators. Most "of the striking, miners went back to work today under a two-week truce. May Call Night Session Edward F. McGrady, special Military Court- Finds Them Guilty of Murdering Thou- sands of Victims I DACHAU, Germany, May general military court to- day sentenced 58 operators of the notorious Mauthausen extermina- tion camp to hang. Three others were given life terms. The 61 defendants were senten- ced after the American court found them guilty of murdering thousands of victims imprisoned by the nazis in persecution cam- paigns. The court called the defendants one by one to hear their doom. This parade lasted 45 minutes. Each reading took 38 seconds and then the defendants were led away individually by two white OT- helmeted guards of the Ninth di- fore the first fuli government conciliator, told re- porters that a night session may- be held tonight in an effort to speed work on. a new contract. The coal producers' committee Jevoted a noon recess to an at- Lempt to try to agree among themselves on what to do about Lewis' holiday pay demand, which has deadlocked the nego- tiations since they resumed at government request April 29. Freight Restrictions Off This was the over-all picture: 1. Restrictions on freight, ex- press and parcel post shipments came off at midnight, hours be- eight times, the court Farm Club Youths Guests of Kiwanis Dairy Leaders Here For Show Make Interesting Talks to Club and Boys Members of the Kiwanis club have been and are going to the fairgrounds to see the dairy cal- ves many of them have sponsor- ed for county farm club youths. Today they saw some of the youths, for almost all of the lads who are assigned calves in this year's dairy calf program and who are sponsored by Kiwan- ians or their businesses were guests of the Some of the lads are "second- year" dairy calf feeders, and showing'they have made is one of the substantial arguments that have spurred Kiwanians and. oth- ers here to continue and expand the program this year. Bernard Marquardt, Wisconsin breeder on whose farm was rear- ed the cow that holds the U. 3. record for milk and butterfat pro- duction for M-ilking Shorthorns, invited and answered Questions. P. C. McGalliard, A. and M, ex- tension service, praised the pro- ject here, the work the boys have already done and the fine work of C. H. Hailey, county agent. John Boehr, extension dairy- man, pictured how-dairy develop- ment would go hand in hand with beef cattle production, and call- ed attention to the future, in which a smaller percentage of citizens must feed a growing city population. were no restrictions on where they should go. That makes it virtually impossible for us to make an identification of the per- sons responsible." The AFL's southern labor con- ference, which ended yesterday, vision. Fifty president read: "The court in closed session, two thirds of the members being present and concurring, sentence you to death by hanging at such time and place as a higher author- ity may direct." August Eigruber, gauleiter o: the upper Danube region and die- tator of much of upper Austria during the nazi regime, took hi sentence without emotion. Other defendants turned white Some had to be helped from the courtroom by guards. Completing the 38 day trial, the court said it had refutable record found an of death by endorsed south. negro voting in the It approved a policy statement saying, "organized labor will make this right to vote effective in all southern states and this revolution will end rule by one party in the south." The statement declared that "the two-or-more party system is the only wholesome condition for the development of democrat- ic practices." (Negroes are voting in some southern state primaries this year for the first time.) The delegates from 12 states came to this mountain city with the purpose of opening the AFL's southern organizing drive. President Pleased At Bill's Passage WASHINGTON, May Truman congratulat- ed Senate Majority Leader Bark- ley of Kentucky today on the senate's passage of the 000 loan to Britain bill. House Speaker Rayburn told reporters that Mr. Truman term- ed last Friday's senate vote a great victory. The comniendation took place at the president's weekly confer- ence with congressional leaders. Rayburn said the house bank- ing committee will start hearings on the British loan legislation soon and that they might last about two w'eeks. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads shootings, gassings, hangings anc regulated starvation; which made every official "cupably and crim- inally responsible." This largest of all mass war crimes trials will be followed, probably at the end of the week, by the trial of 75 nazi SS men for the massacre of American sol- diers at Malmedy, Belgium, dur- ing the battle of the Ardennes Bulge in the winter of 1944-45. Coyotes and Wild Dogs Destructive Residents of Egypt Area Begin Efforts to Wipe Out Animal Raider's Residents of the Egypt com- munity are setting in to eliminate some coyotes and a pack of wild dogs. Chicken losses have ,been getting heavy lately and the dogs are reported pulling down arid killing calves. Saturday Ira Lee Hilbum shot one of the dogs and Monday his brother Joe knocked down one of the coyotes, two others getting away. Joe wac in Ada later Monday and reported that some of the residents af the area are making plans for more organized effort to -wipe out the destructive ani- mals. It is unfortunate that we did not keep a bigger army abroad. I think that removal of that force affected the economic and prob- ably the political situation. ed into the mines to end the 42- day shutdown. 2. Other conservation measures light controls over all coal to be produced during the in effect. 3. The government prodded miners and operators alike to reach a swift agreement on a new contract, but both sides said privately there was little hope of meeting the Wednesday deadline fixed by President Truman. 4. Congress showed no inclina- tion to back down from its de- termination to seek a legislative barrier to future crisis growing out of labor disputes. The sonata turned its full attention to writ- ing a strike control bill. Pcnn Miners Balky The attitude of some Pennsylvania miners introduced a jarring note into Lewis's back- to-work appeal. They voted to abide by their traditional "no contract, no work" policy. The United Mine Workers chief asked his men to return to their jobs for the next 12 days as a "contribution x x x to our lion's economy." Coal miner during that period, he said, can be diverted to es- sential facilities "and the nation's health and security thus safe- Continued on Page 2 Column TH' PESSIMIST Bob Blink., Jp, Ther's too many poor folks who think nothin's too good fer "em. Th' older you- git th' more respect you have fer rockin' chairs an' beds.   

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