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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 7, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Considering harsh words and accusations accompanying them, announcements that a legislative battle is going to take place "on the floor" usually mean it is going to be on a low level. Generally full' llirouftli daj' partly cloudy .south this afternoon. THE ADA EVENING NEWS Nttl, I'nld Clmilxlon 8131 Member, Audit.Bureau of Circulation 43rd IS ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, MAY 7, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY, House Committee Slashes SPA Plan For Lines In Area Leaves in Construction Program Transmission Line From Denison Dam to Ada, Rejects Request for Extension From Ada on to Markham Ferry as Not Needed Just Now B. B. Howard Dies Today B. B. HOWARD Ada Business Man Since 1907 Was Critically III For Several Weeks B. B. Howard, Ada business man since died at 11 local hospital just after noon today. He had been critically ill for several weeks and had rallied re- peatedly despite a serious heart condition. He was 69. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 3 o'clock from the First Baptist church. Active pallbearers will be H. J. Huddleston, Foster McSwain. Or- ville Spann. Martin Clark, H. S. Moore and Dr. Ed Granger: hon- orary: R. W. Simpson, John D. Rinard. J. W. Lewis, Dr; Sam McKeel, Les Prince and W. D. Little. Until recently he was active in management of the Howard Sheet Metal and Roofing comp- any which he had developed from the Howard Tin Shop he estab- lished here years ago. Born In Tennessee Mr. Howard born in. Sevior- ville. eastern Tennessee, grew up there nnd moved lo Melissa, Tex. Later ho moved lo Potlawatomie county, then to Wanettc. In he came to Ada, moving his family here in 1909. For a number of years he and Charles plumber, occupied the building now housing tho Homo Federal Savings and Loan and Finloy and Lollnr; they had erected that building. Built Larger Business Home In 19.30 he f reeled tho Howard building at llf> South Ronnie: to lake care of needs for increas- :nc space of the sheet metal and i oof ing business. During t h c the company had several contracts for government roof- inc work in this area. His passing will be felt by manv friends hero in addition to tho family, and lie will be missed at the First Baptist church, whorj his constant interest and sound counsel were valued through many years. He is survived by the widow, 831 South Stockton, where the family has lived for a number of years; three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Clark of Corpus Tex., Mrs. Iticliiird Bradford of Mrs. Wilfong of four sons, Bernard G.. Clyde, S.-iiu Charles A. Howard, Ada; two brothers, Clarence and Crockett Howard, Sevic.-ville; n half-brother, K a r 1 Howard, Sevierville: a nephew. Robert Howard, Sevierville. who has visited here several times. Clar- ence nnd Crockett Howard have been here for several days at the bedside of their brother. Each season we hear the cry for making tho golf ball It rnicht serve equally well to make the locker highball smaller. JWEATHER] OKLAHOMA Generally fair through Wednesday except partly cloudy south this afternoon; cool- er extreme southeast portion to- r.ifiht; low temperatures middle 40's to lower 50's; warmer Wed- nesday. Forecast For May 7-10 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wednes- day and Thursday, cooler Satur- day and Sunday with tempera- tures averaging within 3 degrees of season's normal; showers Fri- day. Saturday and Sunday in moderate amount over Missouri, Oklahoma and eastern Kansas and light amount western Kansas and Nebraska. WASHINGTON, May The house appropriations com- mittee walloped the ambitions of the Southwest Power administra- tion today, slashing a budget- backed request for to Personally supported by Speak- er Sam Rayburn SPA asked the money for 'transmission lines from hydroelectric power dams in the southwest and to con- struct steam plants to augment the water power. The money was asked for the fiscal year 194'7, be- ginning July 1, to start a long- time program costing The cut by the congressional committee was disclosed when it FACES FIGHT ON FLOOR TULSA, Okla., May 7, <.V) G. Wright said to- day he assumed a fight would be made on the floor of the house, to restore more than whacked by a committee from an appropria- tions request of the south- western power administra- tion. Wright, administrator of the SPA, told reporters he had not received a copy of the committee's report and therefore was unable to com- ment on it in detail. If the slash were finally approved it would -wreck or seriously delay attempts to integrate various hydroelec- tric projects being built in southwest by the army engineers. introduced the interior deparl- mcnl's supply bill in the house. Exponents of public and private power ownership threshed the matter out for more "than-a week (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Find Box Holding War Bonds, Driver Is Sought James Williams of Ada was traveling between Atoka and Mc- Alester on State Highway No. 69 Monday when he discovered a large wooden box laying on the road. He slopped his automobile and found that the box contained worth of war bonds in ad- dition to other valuable papers. He brought the box to Ada, where he turned it over to Quin- lon Blake, chief of police, who in turn contacled slale authorities to find tho owner of the box. In addition to the bonds, the box contained insurance papers, marriage license, car papers and other valuable papers. The im- portant papers designated the owner of the box as Connie E. Murphy of Los Angeles, Calif. Murphy is believed to be driv- ing a 1935 Studobaker sedan with a California license tax. This in- formation was obtained from the car papers found in the box. Early Tuesday afternoon, state authorities! had not located the driver of the car, according to in- formation from the local police slalioh. When Murphy is located, he will be told of his loss and given the box and its contents, Chief Blake said. -K- One Man Killed In Battle at Mine Another Wounded in Gun Fight at Coal Mine HARLAN, Ky., May 7, One man was killed and at least one other was wounded today in a gun battle at the International Harvester company's "Captive" coal mine at Bcnham, Ky. J. G. Galbreath, general mana- ger of the mine, identified th-2 dead man as "Senator" Brock, Slansfill..Ky., another man, iden- tified as Joe Shepherd, Elcomb, Ky., was admitted to a Harlan hospital with a bullet wound in his shoulder. 'His condition was not considered serious. Galbreath said he was inform- ed lhat the men were fired on from aulomobiles near the mine entrance and that the Bcnharn miners returned the fire. There were unconfirmed re- ports that several other men were wounded during the exchange of gunfire. The Benham mine, employing about 500 men, has been opera- ling under contract with the Progressive Miners union and has continued to operate during the nationwide walkout of the United Mine (Workers union sinco April The UMW established a picket line at the mine shortly after the nationwide coal strike'start- ed, but withdrew it after IWT attempts failed. UMW. officials said at the time that they hoped lo persuade the Progressive Min- ers to join in the walkout. Big Four Discusses Trieste Area Conciliator Off Settlement Method In Reims Where Year Ago Signed German Surrender, Not Enough Troops to Parade British troops, maintaining Allied control over the disputed city of Trieste, march through the streets of the city as the Big Four Foreign Ministers Conference at Paris debates the status of the area which Russia seeks for Yugoslavia. An Anglo-Ameribari. bloc is trying to return this much disputed area to Telephoto. by Leo Charier Meet Series Ends Neighborhood Discussion Meetings Completed, Board Resumes Work On Revisions Citizens of the Washington school district filled almost half of the school auditorium Monday night for discussion of proposals for city charter revision. Claude McMillan, one of the members of the board of free- holders elected from the'ward of which 'Washington district is a part, presided and after outlining the basis for the proposed changes answered questions or directed them to Dr. C. F. Spenc- er, chairman of the board. Again, as in preceding neigh- borhood meetings, the freehold- er board members made it -plain that the proposed charter provi- sions do NOT have anything to do with a raise in water rates, and does NOT set what is to be done'about the airport, but would install a revised plea of city government, more efficient and more democratic. They implied rather definitely that such talk, which has been tied up with charter discussions by some citizens, is an effort to confuse the matter, discredit tha proposed change to a council- manager form of city government and so affect the vote ,that will be .called in a few weeks. They also explained, how the proposals are drawn up to keeo out. as far as is "humanly pos- petty and clique politics. The board now goes into a series of smaller meetings to de- cide on final wording of some of the provisions and approval of the charter revision in .the final form in which it will be submit- ted to the voters soon, probably in June. Sixth Mystery Death on List Body of Man Found On Railroad Tracks Near Tex- arkana Dead When Placed There TEXARKANA, Ark., May 7, mutilated body of a man was discovered on railroad tracks near Tcxarkana early to- day and.a' coroner said the death was suspected as the Texarjcana area's sixth slaying in six weeks. Dr. Frank C. Engler, coroner of Little River county, Ark., said the man was identified from a social security card as Earl Cliff Mc- Spadden. The man also carried a registration card with the U.S. employment office nt Shreveport, La., dated May 6, 1946. A first report said the social security card, No. 147-09-4323, was issued in Kansas, but the Shreveport U.S.E.S. office said the series of numbers indicated it was issued in Baltimore, Md. The Shreveport office said the man had filed a "courtesy claim" at Shreveport yesterday, but had failed to leave his home'address. XX Engler said his coronei-'s jury, etc., picking up fourth Graf Etigler'said that his coroner's jury returned a verdict that the man came' to his death at the hands of persons unknown, and that he was dead before the body was placed on the tracks. The body was found about 6 a. m. on tracks of the Kansas City Southern railroad, about sixteen miles north of Texarkaiia. A freight train had passed about a. m. The body was discovered as officers in this area were search- ing for the person who shot Virgil Starks to death as Starks sat in his living room listening to the radio Friday night. Starks'wife was wounded by the'same assail- ant. His slaying occured in Mil- ler county, Ark., also near Texar- kana. No developments were report- ed in the search for Starks' slay- er. Injustice To Tiger, Slayer Maynard Russell Bagged 750-Pounder in Burma Anyway, it was a tiger, and it was killed in Burma by Lt. May- nard Russell. First inf9rmation on the weight of the animal was 375 pounds. That didn't do justice to the mag- nificence of the huge striped kitty, for he weighed 750 pounds. Then, it slipped through in 'the story Sunday that the animal weighed 75 pounds (the deck of the headline said 375, to make it all a bit more 1 And; to complete the confusion, Russell was on- the right of the picture and not on the left. So it you still have that Sunday front page, insert 750 pounds for the 375 and the 75 pound figures, and move the reference to the Ada'man to the right, from the left, and you'll have it all straight.' Showers Moving On Out of State Ada Gets .27 in Rainfall. During Night By The Associated Press Thunderstorms which dotted Oklahoma overnight are expect- ed to move eastward out of the state today after dumping more rain in the southeastern part, the federal weather bureau pre- dicted. A long range forecast indicated another storm is on the way, however, with more showers due Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Temperatures are expected to remain near normal. Heaviest overnight rainfall was recorded at Shawnee, where 1.38 inches fell. Almost every point in, the northeast part of the state re- ported some rain overnight, but the amounts varied greatly. Bar- tlqsville had .29, Chandler 1.07, Miami, .15, New- kirk .11, Okmulgee 1.12, Ponca City Pryor, .91, Sallisaw .36, Tulsn .84, and. Vinita 1.11. In the southwest Altus had .56, Carnegie .02, Hollis .09, Waurika .21, and other points were missed completely. Elk City had .04, El Reno .21, and Enid .52.- In the southeast Ada reported .27, Ardmore and Durant .01 each, McAlester .27, Poteau .03, arid Tuskahoma .09. Guerrillas Strike In Philippines More Dangerous Now, Being Armed with Jap Nambu Machine Guns MANILA, May rillas, armed with Japanese Nam- bu machine-guns today ambushed a Filipino military police patrol near Aliaga, Nueva Ecija pro- vince, killing a private and pos- sibly 13 others. Col. Liberate Littaua, Luzon MP zone commander, said the body of Pfc. Gregorio Gunges showed, signs of having'been beat- en with rifle bulls. He said' the patrol was ambushed by Hukbal- ahaps (peasant guerrillas) who have been blamed for- scores of recent killings in central Luzon. "They're the same people that caused trouble said the colonel, "but with a difference. Now they have i automatic and Garand rifles, Jap- anese rifles, Nambu light, ma- chineguns and even a mortar." -----------------------K---------------------' LAWTON, May Gen. Ralph Met. Pennell. retired, .will head a new bank at Fort Sill, expected to be in operation by July 1. The bank's new charter lists-the new firm, as the Fort Sill National 1 bank. Its beginning capital was placed at with a surplus of and undivided profits totaling Dairy Calves Arrive Here Shipment Brings 115 From Wisconsin; 21 Go To Adults, Others to Farm Youths Three cattle cars, occupied by 115' head of dairy animals from Wisconsin, arrived in Ada Tjes- day morning; the' calves are be- ing distributed to farm youth in Pontotoc county. Twenty-one of the animals were purchased by C. H. Hailey, county agent, and Elmer Kenison, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, for coun- ty adult dairymen. In'addition to 73 head of Milk- ing Shorthorns, which was the largest single consignment of purebred dairy cattle ever to leave Janesville, Wis., there.were six- Jersey and .13 Guernseys bought in Jefferson county and 40 head of Holsteins, nearly all purchased in Dane county. Many of the cattle purchased in Dane county were from state institution herds. Milking Short- horn sires were purchased from individuals. Third Such Trips The Ada buyers were assisted by Mr. McCann of Janesville, L. J. Merriam, of the Jefferson county Guernsey association, and County Agent 'R. V. Hurley of Dane county. It was the third trip for the Ada buyers in Wisconsin. They went north in 1S44 to purchase 39 head of Holsteins and return- ed last year to buy 57 head of Holsteins and Shorthorns; this year the program was greatly ex- panded. County farm youths, who are members of the F.FA or 4-H clubs pay nothing at the time of de- livery, but have the right to pay j actual cost plus transportation at any time to acquire full owner- ship. Otherwise they agree to i turn back a purebred calf to their sponsor in payment for the animal placed in their custody. Six From Granger Herd In addition to the'Cattle pur- chased in Wisconsin, six Jersey heifers were purchased from Dr. i Ed Granger before Kenison, Hailey and Harvey Lambert left for the northern slate to acquire additional purebred dairy cattle for "Pontotoc county farm youths. Ninety-four of the animals from Wisconsin, plus the six purchased from Dr. Graiiger will go to farm youths. An additional 18 head of purebred dairy heifers are to be purchased to-fill an original order for 118 head. Local and state businessmen signed contracts to sponsor youngsters in the dairy program iind for that renson 118 hend of dairy animals will be added to the herds in the county. It was estimated that was paid for the 115 animals bought in Wisconsin. Cordry Accused 01 Reckless Driving Ira Cordry was arrested Mon- day by Cy Killian, highway pa- trolman, and charged with reck- less driving in the Percy Arm- strong justice court. He entered a plea of guilty and was fined and costs Tuesday morning. Cordry drove a 1938 Chevrolet coach from an unknown point to about one mile north of Ada on Highway 99, without due regard to traffic existing there, say the charges. GENERAL DIES IN EUROrE FRANKFURT, Germany, M'ay 7, Gen. Edward C. Betts, judge advocate general of American forces in Europe, died of a heart ailment here last'nteht. army headquarters announced to- day. He was 56 years old. Gen. Betts was stricken a week ago and. removed to 97th General hospital. Mrs. Betts, who flew from Washington by plane, and their daughter, Anne, a Berlin Red Cross club director, were at the bedside. REIMS, May 7, city of Reims, where one year ago to- day Col. Gen. Gustav Jodl scratched his name on a docu- I ment which sent the European i phase of. World War II into the 'archives of history, observed the first anniversary of the sur.en- der loo few sold- i iers in town to hold a parade. The citizens and soldiers ob- served the day mainly by visiting the surrender room in the "Little Red the formee "war room" "of supreme head- quarters, allied expeditionary forces, which has become a French- National shrine and a place where visitors may absoro a bit of the atmosphere of historical events which occureJ in it. The room has been preserved as it was at the moment "of the German capitulation. The war maps are there, the weather maps, railway 'maps and supply maps. "A "lay-on" iard lists air force missions of the following day. There is a chart of allied casualties as of May 6, 1945, showing killed in action, wounded and 561. missing. Next to .it is a chart in the form of a nazi-swas- tika, showing German prisoners taken. In the center of the room is a long, scarred and begrimed table where the historic surrender document was signed. Placed around it are 13 straight-backed wooden chairs, with placards showing who occupied them. Unless the visitor looks clo-cly he is apt to miss a piece of paper pasted on the wall near a row of windows. The paper' is ythe "top secret" war room daily sum- mary. No. 335. It reads: "Surrender. The German pov- ernment surrendered uncondi- tionally at Reims, France, at 0241 hours 7 May 1945. The instru- ment of surrender was signed by Lt, Gen. W. Bedell Smith for Q supreme commander and by Ten- eral Oberst Gustav Jodl for ths German government. Maj. Gen. Ivan Susloparov signed as rep- resentative of the Russians, and Gen. Francois Sevez as represen- tative of the French government. Hostilities officially cease at 2301 hours, central European time." Understanding With Russia Is Churchill Plea, Through U. N. Only With Such Understanding Can Catastrophe Be Avoided, He Says, Describing Awful Results of Alterna- tive Course LONDON, May Churchill declared today "the supreme hope and prime endeavor" toward achieving lasting peace "is to reach a good and faithful un- derstanding with Soviet Russia through the agency and or- ganism of the United Nations." "Only in this way can catastro- phe be he said. The wartime prime minister spoke at a ceremony giving him the freedom of the city of West- minister, the section of London embracing the houses of parlia- ment and Westminister Abbey. He spoke at Church house, where the first session of the United School Sanitation Drive Shows Much Gain Over County A Pontotoc school improve- ment drive, sponsored by the county superintendent's office in cooperation with the county health department, was success- ful to the point that an average gain for all the rural schools in the county is 36 per cent. The greatest gain was 276 per cent, made by the Union Hill school. On the first check made by authorities, the school had a total of 25 points, but when the last cherk. was made the school was credited with 94 points. How Points Earned If everything was in ship- shape, a school could collect the following number of points: wat- er supplv, 24 per cent; toilet fa- cilities, 24 per cent; lavatory fa- cilities, 10 per cent; hcathiK and ventilation, 12 per cent; lighting, 10 per building, 8 per cent, and equipment, 12 per cent. Fifty-two schools had a pos- sible score of points on the score sheet used by the health department. Actually, these 52, schools scored points for 53 per cent on the first check. The first scores varied from 10 to 98 per cent out of a possible score of 100. The score indicated a greater effort on the part of some schools was greater than others. Norman C. Mitchell, county .superintendent, said that he is well pleased with the improve- ment' made by county schools in the improvement program. How They Gained Colbert went from 78 to B8, A h 1 o s o from 64-90, McCalls Chapel 64-98, Worstell 86-96; Union Hill 25-96, Maxwell 44-81, Wilson 29-73, V a n o s s 60-76, Union Valley 58-65, Oakman 85- 88, Summers Chapel 42-74, Lightning Ridge 40-70, Red Oak, 43-65, Laxton 58-71, Lula 41-50, Steedman 43-6S. Owl Creek Nations security council was held. Churchill asked the world to ponder "what happens if the United Nations themselves are sundered by an awful schism, a clash of ideologies and "Failure to find the he said, "may lead the whole hu- man race into a new period of misery, slaughter and abasement more agonizing and fatal than those which have twice been en- dured in the lifetime of most of us." He called on "the English- speaking world and the western democracies of Europe to movs together in creating a true fel- lowship with Russia." "I hope in this world organiza- tion there will be n strong France and a revived he said. "France, after all her troubles, mny yet lead Europe into pence and plenty." Flashing of Light Spurs Search Crew May Indicate Someone Survived Crash in Mountains LIVINGSTON, Mont., May 7, of a flashing Jighl on a mountain near Geyser, Mont, 75 miles north of here, ear- ly today gave rise to hopes that more than one man may 1 nve es- caped from an mis- sing since Sunday with six a- board. The Great Falls, Mont., army aii' base public relations office said an investigation was launch- ed immediately after a resident of Geyser reported seeing the flashing light. The .plane took off from Billings, Lovelady 62-79, Pecan Grove Mont, for Seattle Sunday. 73-91, Black Rock 55-62, Francis One of the occupants, Sgt. 75-89, Phkell 82-92, Conway 40- I Frank Avry. Youngstown, Ohio, 81, Cedar Grove 84-98, Center 42- 89, Galey.41-43, Bebee 36-29, Hart 68-90, Lawrence 64-73. Homer 44- 80, Horse Shoe 22-22, Sunshine 25-53. The first check gave the schools and the second showed a gain of 655 or bailed out near Wilsall, in cen- tral Montana. At Wright field, Dayton, Ohio, public relations department identified the six aboard as: Maj. D. L. Van Fleet, the pilot, Maj. L. F. Simmons, Lt. Col. H. W.'Sachs, Lt. M. S. Epstall. W. H. Wiggins, and Chris E. ST LLWATER, May .7.-W- a The federal bureau of investiga- Dayton. Ohio. Addresses of the ion, in cooperation with Okla- arm personnei were not avail. homa A. M. college, will con- able immediately. duct a school for -law enforcement j officers at Camp Redlands May 27 through May 31. Speakers will include- FBI agents, Attorney General Mac Q. Williamson, and Maj-. J. M. Thax- ton, of the Oklahoma highway patrol. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads ENID, May Enid symphony orchestra, under the direction of Victor B. Danek, will give a concert here Thursday night as a special feature of na- "tional music week. Miss Mary Marcia Buchanan, high school senior, violinist, will be concert soloist, Both Sides In Quick Denial Not Received, Soy Opera- tors; Soys Mint Union Official of Offer WASHINGTON, May Government Conciliator Paul W. Fuller said today he had made to operators and mine workers a proposal to clear the way for set- tlement of the 37-day old soft cool strike. Both sides in the controversy. however, immediately questioned Fuller's statement to reporters. Edward R. Burke, head of the Southern Coal Producers associa- tion, told newsmen the operators had received no peace 'proposal from Fuller. At the headquarters of John L, Lewis, of the United Mine Work- ers, an official said that to char- acterize the Fuller proposal as a definite proposition for settling the strike was "a joke." Both May Deny It Informed of the reaction to his statement of operators and mine workers, Fuller said it might be anticipated that both sides would deny a proposition had been made, because neither porty would care to be placed in the po- sition of rejecting such a proposal in a time of crisis. Burke's denial that a definite peace proposal had been received was made after a caucus of the operators, which Fuller said was called to discuss it. Fuller said his proposal also would be con- sidered at a meeting today of the UMW's policy commit' tee. Fuller declined to discuss ths terms of the proposal. (In New York, Edward F. Mc- Grady, a special mediator in the coal, negotiations, said he hoped there might be a settlement very shortly.) Contract negotiations between the miners and operators were re- cessed until tomorrow to permit further study of the proposal. Fuller's Own Proposal It was reported by those inside the conference that Fuller's pro- posal was his own and did not or- iginate at yesterday's White House meeting of President Tru- man, Secretary of Labor Schwel- Reconversion Director Snyder and White House Assist- ant John R. Steelman. Fuller interrupted this morn- ing's negotiating session to confer separately with Lewis and with Charles O'Neill, head of the Northern Appalachian Producers group, and Edwnrd R. Burko, head of the S9ulhorn Coal Pro- ducers association. The government proposal was offered shortly after the solid fuels administration clamped tighter restrictions on soft coal deliveries to consumers. Household users having more than a five-day supply on hand were denied any more bituminous coal, in one of a scries of restric- tive orders effective immediately. Secretary of Commerce Henry A. Wallace told a news conference in Detroit that the coal strike was rapidly reaching the point whoro it would "transgress general wel- fare." Picked Graduation Date Announced Closing Day Program Set For Wednesday Night A graduation and closing dny program will be given at tin Pickelt school Wednesday night nl 0 o'clock, according to Mrs. Bill Bevel's, eighth grade sponsor. Six eighth graders svill take part in the graduation exercises and C. Mitchell, county superintendent, will be the prin- cipal speaker. Mrs. Bcvers said that the public is invited to attend the closing day program and the graduation exercises. THr PESSIMIST Dob Btan'rfl, Jr. Whut's becowe o' th' fashioned girl who thought holdin' hands wuz goin' loo fer? You don't have t' be crazy t' be a man, but it helps a lot   

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