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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 14, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 14, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Try fo mok. ,hings cleor then ab8u( bein9 foo Partly cloudy to cloudy, warmer cast Sunday, tliumlcrshowers and cooler in panhandle late Sunday FHE ADA EVENING NEWS Average Net March Paid Clrculallw 8078 Member: Audit Bureau of ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Seminole High Wins Sweepstakes Award, Many Share Honors Two Day, of VocaF and Instrumental Music by Young Mus.c.an, of 18 High Schools in E. C. Music Meet Indn-idual honors went to boys and girls of 18 schools over the district who sang, pJayed, in the fir ful fl fledged competition since the ErnstWolfT Spends Busy Here war reduced such activities. t Jimmie J McCoy, director of the Seminole high school band is a 1928 graduatl of East Cental college, and A. W. Sem- inole vocal instructor, was gradu- ated from the college here in Dairy Calf Program h Growing Here Year Some 20 Heifers To Be Bought for Dairymen As Well as Farm Youths Results of the 1945 Chamber of L-ommerce-sponsored dairy calf program are even greater than were expected when registered dairy heifers were first Some Grocery Prices Not Much Different Climax of Activity Came With Direction of Massed Chorus of Young Voices Best To State Meet There were hundreds of high school contestants here during the two days many of them wearing colorful band costumes. Ratings won in the numerous vocal ami instrumental contests will be found on Pajrc 10. or individ- excellent or super- ior rating arc eliy'hln Any time Ernst Wolff wants to ior arc eligible for the state come this way again, he will find i'na's competition coming up soon a welcome awaiting him, for he or ihe best hifih school musici- won many friends and admirers an? a11 Parts of Oklahoma. during the several days he was T Judges were Albert Lukken here last week working with -FT umversity; Miss Mariorie young musicians. Dwycr, OCW; Wayne M Thorn A tenor and a pianist, he start- Bethany Peniel; Ernst Wolff e ed Tuesday night with a concert enor and Pianist. at the college which delighted an Described audience with its excellence. L are described Wednesday night he directed a massed chorus of high school singers from three high schools and East Central college in ai r performance which, as always be- bomf? fore the war temporarily halted p winner the program, amazed its audience BrEde of 'io with the skill and versatility de- ixcellent an unusual per veloped among the boys and m many respects bu The follows: best conveivable performance for the event and the class of participants, worthy I of hnmrr recognized as a "first or a percentage clubs during signed .up 35 months after County Grand Jury Is To Meel Monday No Spectators Allowed In Courtroom While Investi- gation! Are Under Way Twenty-four county men who have been selected to and professional men were eager to sponsor calves for 4-H and A numbers this results from the were outstanding. Sponsors Sign lip Readily Harvey Lambert, local attorney and member of the Chamber of Commerce, and County Agent C. Hailey met with various civic the past week and men who wanted to sponsor calves this year. Elmer Kenison, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, has been durinS Seven Months After War I and Seven Months After War II; Big Difference Is Foods Not Advertised Then as Now MWiAjr ilCtXCIS, X1G WHS t T warded for his work by a record m June' Not Advertised Then as By MARJOBIE KITCHEL the meat market and the grocery store seven months after firing ceased in World War t w. t-caocu. 111 w uiici war tO Were similar to the talk today in April, 1946, Future of County months after World War II. Sinp With Ease, Skill Dozens and dozens of boys and prls were arranged on the col- ic singe. Coached already by their directors in the nce in many respects bu "ot worthy of highest rating due defects, Gonr! "95' o? ouiilni promise Wltl? m compared to but one as he took ____ of songs from Palestrina's impres- sive '-Tenebrae Factac Sunt" to a sprightly performance of ''O Su- sanna" by Foster and a spirited rendition of Cam's arrangement Ezcklcl Saw thc Wheel." Mrs. Dorothy Stubbs was ac- companist. The directors who had prepar- ed the young singers were Ever- ett of Wcwoka, A W .Kennedy of Seminole. Otis Stock-' Freeholder Board To Visit, Inspect Other State Cities Ada's board of freeholder of Konawa and Mrs. Marguc- considering revision of the Ada Hawkmson. East Central. city charter adopted in 1912 Fri 4 I, _______ I i A 4 1- yers are taking part in the pro- gram. They feel that the dairy program is sound and has a great future toward the improvement of dairy cattle in Pontotoc coun- Prices on eleven foods the E.C. Debaters In Excellent Showing At Baylor Meet Bilking. Shorthorns and 25 Holstems will be purchas- ed as a part of the dairy program when Lambert, Hailey and S son leave April 20 for Madison, wjs. Holstems will be purchased in Dane county, Wis., while the East Central's speech depart- men will go south from Madison made an excellent showing to purchase Milking Shorthorns. ln the Kappa Delta tourna- Fifteen Jersey and 15 Guern- of the Province of the Low- sey heifers will be bought for the er Mississippi, held at Baylor uni- program but they will be obtain- ed in Oklahoma and Missouri, ac- Waco, Texas, April 11-13. Tw9 the three undefeated make the trip. men who... will were from East Cen- college and two-of the the tournament. Thelma Hokey and Barbara u i comeback of the massed was accom- plished dospito thc fact that Wli- cox and Kennedy returned from service after the school year be- gan and had not hud their stu- dents for the full term. Holds Auditions Thursday Wolff held auditions all day for students of voice an piano in the college music depart rnent and was generous with hi time, inspiring in his suggestion Ior improvement. He also work ed some with the East Centra Concert Singers. r- night got farther along the lac- for the Interscho Jastic Music Meet, and helped on Friday and Saturday in judrinf, voice and .instrumental contests and left with many of the vount musicians inspiration and interest stimulated to a higher degree, Pin-UpllueenTs Mother of Pair SEATTLE, April 13. j nSV' Seabees on Guam select- ed Miss Dye" of Seattle as their Pin-up queen from a collection 01 glamor pictures entered in a mail contest they initiated sev- eral months ago. Here's what they may no know about "Miss Dye-" She's Mrs. Duane Faye Dve happily married fo frooly into the discussions. J. D. Willoughby, retiring in May as commissioner' of public works and property, and Burrell Oliver commissioner elect are being invited to attend the Mon- ti? to discuss with i116. work of that de- f gate first hand' how some citv government 9 governments function. Charters arc coming in now from other citief breeders have requested i Fnst Centralites were selected aa tmen two Milking .of the best three debaters in Shorthorn bulls in addition'to --------4 several registered bred heifers. HtaanTMes Friends on Trip Few Notice First Lady, Guests from Home Town Among Tourists WASHINGTON, April Harry S.'Truman and six members of her Independence, i _, -.-r--. Mo., bridge club mingled little mePs Qral interpretation and hundreds and Hansard defeated Trinity college San Antonio, Tex., in the finals of the women s division and Rudolph I Hargrove and Ben Epperson tied Tulsa university for -first place in the men's division. Barbara Hansard and Ben Ep- person were designated among the three best individual debat- Other East Centralites won honors in the tournament, which was attended by 15 colleges universities throughout the prov- ince. Pete Richerson placed second But judging from the news- paper ads then and now, there were many differences. On Fri- days now almost half of the pa- per advertises groceries. To get the eleven items mentioned in the accompanying list, the papers for the entire moth of June, 1919 were closely scanned and few were the foods advertised. Most of these came from two ads of the Stanficld Grocery and Market. In their other two ads btnnfields mentioned a special on soap and five store policies. if and E' gave the address and two telephone num- bers. Karo syrup used more ad- vertising space than all the gro- in Ada combined; Although the housewife of to- day has to pay a few cents more she does have some fresh vege- tables and fruits to select from in the store. But don't feel too sor- ry for the 1919 no doubt, had a big garden at home and lots of canned foods serve as frand jurors will meet at 10 am Monday in the district court room where 12 of them will be selected as members of a Pontotoc county grand jury. J A petition asking District Judge Tal Crawford to call a grand jury was presented to the judge about three weeks ago by Ada minis- ters, who were instrumental in getting the petition signed by s veral hundred persons More than ten days ago, the court clerk and sheriff drew f-fiG risjnss ox 24 men. from mpn selected to serve as jurors during this term of court. State Assistant Coming Along with the petition that was presented to the district judge was a request to Governor Kerr asking that an assistant at- torney general from the attor ney general's office be sent to assist in the grand jury Ihe governor forwarded th request to the attorney genera who will have one of his assist ants in Ada for the opening Mon day morning. House Delays Final Action on Extension Of Draft to Monday Writes Five-Months Induction Holiday Into Measure And Puts in Ban to Drafting of Teen-Agers; Senate Still Has Say on Bill Lacking House Bill Restrictions WASHINGTON, April house wrote a :ive-months induction holiday and an end to the drafting of teen-agers into a selective service extension bill today but delayed final action on the measure as a whole until Monday. or tourists who tramped through "PProrop'u speaking. Rudolph the capital sightseein. Hargrove was a finalist in ora- capital sightseeing. dail c ass ?nd Ulng bo icleas or pro i needs "lat The each week. freeholders meet twic DeatTuisT Woman Is Suicide >Vas of a six-year ?nd a four-ycar old girl "I tnmk the follows who chos when I was married "But no so sure they knew about the chil dI sent them the picture ages than her felt the u he was pleased J3ui six-year-old Garv Dve ran over the neighborhiod 'shou "My mom's a pin-up OT OWNER _ April (JP) between two trash barrels. Un aale to locate the owner, listed addresscs, he e bonds over to Police today. a tree in the yard of hir ome southeast of the city todw has been found to be suicide City Detective Gerald St who investigated the death cord P1GCe sash t-ord had bccn used by the an, who the w Lite Roy Mead, oil operator Mead1 that despondent A veteran guide piloted them -ory and speak- V fers ParticiDatinK in the con- East Central were Jean ba Smith and to the great rotunda, Statuary hal1 the old supreme court chamber. At the latter stop a fiS.htseer reached over the er e first lady's shoulder to pluck her HittRinbotham. I companion by the arm, entirely unaware that her neighbor was the president's wife D. East competitors. J._ Nabora Is conch Of the Debate and speech were in Later in the afternoon the Mis- souri women were guests at tea at the Blair house which the gov- ernment maintains for. distin- guished guests, mostly diplomatic dignitaries. Yesterday the visitors, who came here early in the week for 3 the bridSe c.lub- K, I r -frTu------V 8nd EVen that Was buef. They also took a cruise on v e on the Potomac aboard the presiden- tial yacht Williamsburg preslaen Tomorrow the ladies leave for iome. Swimming Course Offered This Week entral swimming pool for per- ons who are qualified to take an v nWfVO, board. the union'new V president prepared for he board's post-convention ses- lon which may have vital mficance lo thc UAW's future The course will be open to any rs person who has the required qualifications. The principal re- quirement is that a person must fiold a senior life saving card About 20 persons have told thev college authorities that v want to take the course and wU I'WEATHER! Partly -armer east tnundershowers and Wade Kilcrease, 101-Year Old Indian, Dies at Cabin Home J. T. Reed Dies In Phoenix, Arizona Moved There Not Long Ago; Was Pioneer Mer- chant in Ada J. T. "Tom" Reed, one of the early day grocers of Ada, died Saturday morning at his home in Phoenix, Ariz., where he had liv-1 ed for the last few years. Funeral services and burial will be at P ,oenix, Monday, a message W friends here Saturday stated Mrs. Reed and their two daugh- ters, all living in Phoenix, sur- vive. O. F. Johnston's Keed and Johnston grocery was one of the stores here in the days when Ada was young. Lat- er Mr. Reed operated a variety store for several years He was critically ill here a few years ago but recovered suffici- ently to move to Phoenix. The two-story Reed home on south Johnston avenue was sold some months ago. Three of Infantry Divisions Heaviest Sufferers in War II WASHINGTON, April infantry divisions which spearheaded the 1944 drive through Southern France after fighting in the Mediterranean suffered the heaviest American army losses of the war. Official but preliminary figur- n, by the army put 3rd, 45th and 36th divisions at the top of the list of casualties suffered by 88 divisions which saw battle action. Altogether men of the 3rd, a regular army unit, were killed, wounded or were missing in action, in fighting in North Afncn, Italy, France and Ger- many. Included were kill- 45th Has Casualties The 45th had casualties Deluding 4030 killed, and the 36th a total of of whom were lulled. Both these were National Guard outfits In the number of men who met death in action, three other di- The assistant from the attornej general's office will work in co operation with County Attorney mr D- McKeown, who succeed eel Vol Crawford, after the grand jury actually starts work on par ticular cases. No Spectators When the grand jury eets started to work, there will be no admittance to the room where the men are meeting. Every ses- sion will be closed except for the jurors, county attorney, assistant attorney general and pers persons being questioned Jurors will possibly be picked Monday and work on specific cases may get started Tuesday or V. ednesday. The jury could be impaneled as "s need be as there is in the court fund, accord- ing to records at the court house. The number of days that the grand jury is in session will de- person or termine the amount of needed.. money Nazi Leader Has To Admit Charge Prosecutors Break Down Kaltenbrunner's Claim Of Ignorance Franco Plan Is Opposed Poland, Mexico to Battle Suggestion 'Friendly' Pow- ers Do Investigating NEW YORK, April Poland and Mexico indicated to day they were prepared-to figh the Franco suggestion that friendly" powers in the United Nations investigate charges that German scientists are working on the atomic bomb in Spain. It still was too early to tell whether they would win enough support in the security council to defeat the proposal, but some delegates expressed the belief privately that it would be re- jected of the limitations Generalissimo were speci- ned m the Spanish communique ssued in Madrid last night: 1. The commission must be nade up of representatives of na- laid down by Franco. Three conditions -ions with which Spain maintains 'riendly relations. .2. It must limit its activities to manufacturing cstnbllsh- ncnts and experiment stnlions to scertam the truth or falsity of he atomic bomb charges. 3. It must agree to give ample ubhcity to the results. Most of the delegates WUFP re- uctant to commit themselves on I ic question pending receipt of le official invitation from Rnnln A decisive vote that would have sent the legislation to the senate was blocked when Rep. Cox (D.-Ga.) demanded a read- ing of the formally engrossed bill with all amendments. Speaker Rayburn 1old the house such a copy could not be ready before Monday. So the house quit and put off the vote until then. There is nothing left to do now except on a motion to re- commit, which is conceded prac- tically no chance; and take- finol action. There will be no roll caJl on the amendments. Senate Still Has Say The senate still has a say com- mg, however, in a committee-ap- proved bill lacking the restric- tions the hnuse voted today The house had been all set to pass the bill today. It had decided by a three-vote margin to prohibit any inductions between May 15 and October 15 of this year, al- rnrtu rriA though extending the'draft'law f until February 15, 19-17, or itself line months from its present "ex- piration date. There was no record vote on the 'holiday" proposal, which went mto the measure by a teller count of 156 to 153 after charges t was inspired by "politics." The nembers turned down a request o v i> t v.u v or a roll call vote on which cacli vould be recorded individually An earlier tentative vote on the ho idiiy" was I4B to 127. I here was no record vote, cith- r, on the amendment raisinu the minimum draft age from Lo 20. It went into the measure a non-recorded vote of IDS to re- aS the CQrlier tonta' BUI Sharply Chnnffed As it neared formal passage, bill was so sharply changed the form in which it was NUERNBERG, April Ihe American prosecution ,it nfn from Spain.' quarters expressed e belief that Soviet Russia was to object conditions. Two Killed, Seven Hurt When Plane (rashes in Chicago CHICAGO, April 13, army air corps lieutenant and his brother-in-law were kill- seven pea-sons were strenuously to written by the housr military committee that new woman representative, Mrs. Hel- en Mankin told the house "the have been cut out of this The house left unchanged its com m it t ce's recommendations for a maximum service liability I of 18 months for all drafted men- bnn '.'Eainst the I on the July i" armed forces; army :-s and men; the i- OLiu- rnjj jo W (JI'U I r r n' uuu j IJliJJ I JlflVV ceeded toaay in breaking down ln.lu'-ea when an army F-B photo- marine corps Einst Kaltenbrunner's obstinate Rapine plane crashed and ex- au''ncd down wore proposals to raise the pay of all service per- sonnel; to givo enlisted men the same terminal pay now granted to officers; to force the i v wa LJ j id Lt.' claim that he had no knowledge with many mu e Nazjs' blackest crimes. Ihe former head of the Nazi ed. security police on trial for crimes admitted he received reg- ular reports during 1942 of tlie progress of the program to ex- terminate the Jewish population m u-erman-occupied territories of eastern Europe. Exhibiting the reports, sent to Kaltenbrunncr when he was a high S S, (Eli to Guard) and po- lice official in Austria, U S Prosecutor John Amen asked: "Is that not just one of a series of reports that went to you everv month? Kaltenbrunner replied I cannot deny that these reports j ploded between a two-story apartment building and a fram house on thc northwest side The army sixth service corn- visions took heavy losses also. TheyJ were the 2Sth, with tilled, 4th division, and 9th division, killed. The casualties were disclosed ln, a general report of activities of the army ground forces during the war. Total casualties ot all army di- visions from Pearl Harbor to V-J day were Of these 144- 160 were killed in action, were wounded and were listed as missing. Infantry Hit Heaviest Much the heaviest' Josses were taken by the infantry divisions. The casualties of the 3rd more 1 lts original strength of the difference being ac- fminfai-I _j___ ter were distributed to police "offi- cials all over the reich." He admitted also signing a let- which discussed Hitler de- for shooting Allied captives cuiu extermination of Jews, of which he had fessed ignorance. vim i j. t i-ui; immc- mand said the pilot, First Lieut. dlntc discharge of all fathers now rii Vi Jr., 22, of "nd to count service had roKlslered his pas- c nierchnnt as part senger as an army .captain, and pas- "r -Ih piirt months maximum re- n, an that army officials had no other qrod of Jnducted men. conoorninK the com- G iclcntifiod In lake Alfus Fall Two persons, injured seriously pro- HOT SPRINGS CAFE MAN SLAIN OUTSIDE HIS plIcE SPRINGS, Ark., April ]3. 43-year-old Hot Springs cafe operator was shot to death to Sunday cooler in thundershowers Sunday -gnt and Monday, cooler Monday nd M northwest Sunday night. 1845, died early this month at his little cabin home of east He had lived there for many years in a neighborhood times. there have been other families in the hilly However he was often in Francis and from time to time for short visits, describe him as Thev u _- become 'very old' he always stayed with jdeas and that he was as ated well among the Indians of his part of the He is reported to have been born March 15. 1845, and to have died April 2, 1946, at the age of 101 years and 23 days. Bartlesville Lads On Treasure Hunt BARTLESVILLE, Okla., April Bartlesville youths on a deep-water "treas- Ul'e hunt but there will be no faded maps to guide them. Eilerts and Roger White, both 18, today sought per- mission from officials to salvage lost boats, motors, fishing tackle and llke equipment from the floor of Spavinaw Lake. We have made our own div- ing helmet, con verted'from armv gas masks and have an air com- they explained. They said they had tested the at Sunset counted for by a stream placements. of re- Of the armored divisions, the 1st suffered casualties and the 3rd The 1st Cavalry di- vision which fought dismounted in the Pacific counted kill, ed, wounded and missing Heaviest sufferer of the air- divisions was the 82nd with 101st Tenth Time Is "Charm" MARYSVILL.E, Kas., April Habel of I" ville was rejected by the t w "f-fj-icu. uuLbluti establishment in response to moccano. _. as demolished and a message "someone wants speak to you outside." Police reported that Mike Ab- of Shreveport, La nir riir f-_ i Edward Puerlcel who lives near said jt looked to im as though the pilot migl have been trying to land in nearby vacant lot but hit tl ouildmg instead. was hit by a burst of five bullets' 7f fired from an automobile which aftei' I Coroner Foster said ha hn a had not determined whether the bullets were fired from a ma- chine gun or an automatic pistol. to Charges Stcpdaug-hter Did Him Damages DANVILLE, 111., April Marajen Stevenick Horto of the News Gazette accused today in a fed era court suit of alienating he mother's aflertions and was sue damages by her step father, Roy V. at a? Ex-G.I. Anxiously Checking On Where French Bride Now Is army and navy rune times because of an eye ailment, but he had the trouble corrected and the navy accepted him on his tenth ap- plication for enlistment. kills 478 people daily in T, the United States, Jcar, omnett-Meaders! but you can with 4-14-lt Thurinan Wright, first sergeant with (intelligence outfit been anxiously awaiting the ar- rival m Ada of his wife, whom he married in France and who was expected to arrive in Ada Friday. The ex-GI has been meeting every train arriving in Ada since he received a message from the embarkation at New York. The message stated that was to arrive in Ada Friday morning. service. n New Yo'rk. He has even more questions mat are unanswered now since he received the information Sat- urday through the Red Cross. He said that he had no idea of what could have happened. His last letter from the vouna woman was that she missed the boat. Now the FBI and Red Cross are checking to see if she missed which Chickasha, Okla., and Voi-nmT Tex., durjng the wn" JMshormcn who witnessed the accident said the plane flew about 700 feet after hiUmg the power line before striking the water Both men attempted to swim to shore but they soon dis- appeared. No boats i available for rescue. Greater returns .for amount in- News Classified Ada TH' PESSIMIST Bob Dl.nkj, Jr. Cheer up, whut if thing cost as much as a nre- scription. Before they're married it's a peck o1 they're married it's a peck of trouble.   

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