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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 4, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             in MUfe, accoun, was -nore ,han 4 'eduction am.n9 Wfa when WEATHER Fair tonighf and Friday; warmer Friday. comes time to get on the line with. Information, not rumors. 42nd 300 FHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONOS East Central Prepares For Friday Meet High School Students From 31 Schools to Compete In Scholastic Events High school students from 31 schools in the East Central dis- trict will participate in the thir- tieth annual East Central Inter- scholastic contest (curricular di- vision) starting Friday morning. More than students will compete for honors in 33 events. Officials of the meet said that there would be no class division and that the schools would compete along with the larger schools in the area. Ada Killers GO An entry of (iO students from Ada was the largest received by meet officials. Other schools par- ticipating include Allen, Asher, Blaneharcl, Bowlegs, Bryant Bynp. Calvin, Can- City, Clar- ita. Francis. Hickory. Holdenvillo, Horace Mann Konawa. Latin. Lula, McLish, Mason, Maud, Okcmah, Roff, St. Louis. Stonewall. Tishomingo, Tnbbey, Tupelo. Vamoosa, Wan- t-tie, Wewoka and Wilson of near Henryclta. Some schools will have entries in art and home economics ex- hioits. The number of contestants in these two events are smaller than any other event contested. Mortals For Winners Individual winners will re- ceive medals for having won in a contest. Other awards will be made for second and third places m all contests where individuals compete as individuals. A trophy will be awarded the school winning the greatest num- ber of points in the curricular contests, allowing five points for xirst place, throe points for sec- ond place and one point for third .Not more than three students from one school may be entered in any one event and the number of events thai a single sludcnl can enter is limited, according to the rules of the meet. ADA> OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1946 Cantwell 99 Years Old Today Pontotoc County's Only Surviving Civil War Veteran Spends Day Quietly; Still Takes Active Election Part W. B. Cantwell is 99 today. Pontotoc county's last sur- viving veteran of the Civil War is spending the day quietly as he usually does, with a bit of reminiscing among friends FIVE CENTS THE COP1T 50 Children Youngsters at Hilo Rushed To Beach When Sea Re- ceded, Caught by Great Wave HILO, Hawaii, April Hope has been abandoned for 50 school children missing since Monday's tidal wave swept them to sea, Police Chief Anthony Paul said today. "We expect to find them when the ocean gives up its he said. "It will be a long time be- 10. c Hilo ''eturns to normal." Of the 88 persons h'nown dead in the Hawaiian islands, 25 were cmldren, and of the 69 still miss- ing, 50 were youngsters. Boys and ghis rushed to beach- es when the ocean receded just I fore the first of the waves struck. Many were engulfed near the sugar plantation village of Laupahoehoe. _'1 was working on the road with four others when it happen- ed said Henry Simmons, north Hilo road worker. "I looked down the road to- ward the school and saw the children running toward the ocean. There were about 50 of them. Simmons stopped a car and a bus and asked the drivers to help get the Children to safety. "Then the third big- he said. "It didn't seem like a wave. It seemed like the whole ocean had risen and was moving. "The children ran and some of them got away, but those in back were caught. "I saw them bobbing in the water and ran down to help." Of 23 missing at Laupahoehoe 18 were children. Only one bod has been recovered there. and kin. Says Army Lost Track of Drafted Men Once -_ lda-v "H' nrmv "lost of Condemned Slayer Pits Guadal Tricks Against FBI, Cops WASHINGTON, April 4, Earl McFarland, condemned rape-slayer, today pitted the cun- ning he learned on Guadalcanal against the combined efforts of police and FBI manhunters. The 24-year-old ex-marine has been at large since dawn yester- day when he and Joseph D. Med- ley staged a spectacular death house break after overcoming two guards. The recapture of the 44-year- old Medley after a seven-h o u r rnanhunt evidently provided po- llco no clues on McFarland's 300.000 clr.yicd men during the JD a for flight. Bloodhounds war and tried unsuccessfully tolfollowecl one trail to a railroad 'track. liiilt inductions. Crinkling, who said he served at draft headquarters here, oppos- ed t-xtension (if the wartime draft law beyond May 15 at a senate military committee hearing. He now is chairnian of the Now York OPA Passes One Test and Others Loom U. N. Council Sets Aside Iranian Case Administration Still Faces Battle Royal in House to Retain Some Powers By FRANCIS M. LE MAY WASHINGTON, April Congressional battlers for keeping price controls alive shed some of their gloom today as 3PA came through the first house banking committee voting with fewer wounds some lad expected. Rep. Monroney who aid earlier "it looks like OPA will be amended to told Bowles Gets Hot Criticism Southern Senators Bitterly Denounce Order as Making Farmers 'The Goat' By MARVIN I. ARROWSMITH WASHINGTON, April senators flung a tor- rent of hot criticism at Chester __ -_ Bowles today for ordering secre- newsmen, "I believe now OPA tai'y of agriculture Anderson to will be continued in a shape that aPProye a cotton regulation aim- will ed at blocking clothing price in- creases. They called for the stabiliza- tion director's resignation, term- ed his action a "damned outrage" said he was "making farmers the and contended he had jeo- pardized OPA's life. The agency Acts on Byrnes Motion, Based on Russia's Flat Promise to Withdraw Troops By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER NEW YORK, April 4, motion by U. S. Secretary Byrnes, the security council to- day shelved the Iranian case un- will work." Faces Fipht On Floor But the administration has yet to weather a batlle royal on the house floor, where opposition may be stronger than in the com- mittee. That group voted yesterday to repeal OPA's program requiring manufacturers to make low cost clothing. It also approved a plan for the gradual lifting of price controls as supplies of scarce items come into balance with de- mand. Today the committee, meeting behind closed doors, turned to amendments proposing to set up a formula for closing out subsidy programs. The administration currently is asking congress for to continue these premium payments, particularly on food. Their design is to keep retail prices down even as pro- duction costs rise. Extension Length Unsettled Another decision the committee still must make is whether to til May the decision came only after Australia's representa- tive had blasted Soviet Ambas- sador Andrei Gromyko's walkout and accused the council of failing lo do its duly. Nine of the council's 11 mem- bers voted for the Byrnes reso- lution which is based on Russia's promise to Ihe council yes- ly that her troops will all be withdrawn from Iran by early May. Gromyko's continued absence counted for one vote and the ab- stention of Australia's W. R. Hodgson from casting his ballot for the other. Byrnes declared Russia's assur- as satis- Anderson, too, was the target of a pot shot. Said Senator May- bank bank (D-S "I am indeed sorry to see that the agriculture department un- der Mr. Anderson has completely surrendered to the OPA." In Effect April 9 This was a reference to the cab- inet officer's approval of an OPA order requiring larger down pay- ments on cotton purchased for future delivery. It goes into ef- fect April 9. Bowles has contend- ed the order is necessary to check speculative trading in cot- ton' he tion or a nine-month lease on life Rep. Wolcott Engraving W. B. Cantwell, 99 years old today, started voting 78 years aco h now' He is shown here as calt his ballot in the city runoff election of Tuesday With him in the reJVIrS- V; fe precinct JSd Luke mayor-elect and personal Iriend ol the Civil War vet- B. eran. City tune committee against conscription. peacc- army estimates of manpower shortages unless the draft is Ihe circumstances of the dar- ing break, the latest in a series at the district prison, immediate- ly set two investigations in mo- tion, one by the juslice deparl- niont and another by. a special congressional committee. R c P Hebcrl (D-La.) of this group as- sailed "conditions in a jail where murders can walk in and out with He has much lo reminisce about, too, for his lifetime, span- ning one year short of a century, goes back to 1847 when the Uni- ted States was smaller than it now is and when the- internal struggle of the early sixties was shaping up in a sharp division of "Ml t. when tiiev extended, Colliding said: japparcnl of one instance McFarland was convicted of the were needlessly cry- ing for more men, fathers "of families, did men, and everyone It was in the spring of 1844. I'hfn about April !i of Unit year one decided to cheek up a :md discovered they hurl lost ti of 300.000 inducted men- trial they had 300.000 more men than Ihi-y knew they had." Conkling. who said ho served as a "member of the presidential appeal board" at draft headquar- ters from September, 1042, until February, 1945, said the army of- ficials then wanted Maj. Gen Lewis B. Hershey, draft director to "stop all inductions" atclv. immcdi- Hershey refused, Conkling said bc-caus'.- the genera] "had been crowding the local draft boards lor weeks, scraping the bottom of tne barrel." Senate Approves Wages Compromise WASHINGTON. April W) senate approved today compromise to put a Uoor 0. GO cents an hour under of persons covered by the Oct. 5, Ifl'H, rape-slaying of an 18-year-old government girl, Dorothy Bcrruin. Originally sen- tenced to die last August 31, the ex-marine's execution was stay- ed pending an appeal. Medley was found guilty of killing Mrs. Nancy Boyer, 'red- headed Washington divorcee af- ter an all-night poker party in her fashionable apartment here on March 6, 1945. He also was under indictment in the slaying of another redheaded woman in n Now Orleans and Chicago po- lice wanted to question him in connection with the death of a third redheaded woman. Med- ley's execution was set for April 30, but he loo has appealed his conviction. hour law. It adopted. to fi, ;m amend- ment offered by Senator Ellcn- dcr to pending legislation o li.t the present 40 cent cin- irnum. Final action was still to come on several other conversa- tional points. The CO cent minimum would Yardaman Okayed By Vote ol Senate Confirmed for Federal Reserve Board Post WASIUrvGTON, April Governor to Send Attorney fo Aid Grand Jury Probe Tom D. McKeown, county at- torney, received a letter Thurs- day morning from Governor Rob- ert S, Kcrr stating that he had received a letter from Pontotoc county ministers requesting that he send an assistant attorney gen- eral to Ada lo assist the grand jury when it is impaneled. The governor had previoL-.., ul.tlt ioii7 promised a group of county citi- when, at the age of 78, he moved that he would send an as- lo Ada. sistant from the attorney gener- al's office to Ada when the grand jury started. Hn told the group of 14 citizens that he would give any assistance he could toward making Ada and Pontotoc county a better place to County Attorney McKeown said that assistant attorney gen- woujd be in Ada Monday, April 15, when the grand jury will be selected. sentiment. Indian Scout At 15 _ He was born in Arkansas, mov- ing to Parker county, Texas in- 1858. When only 15, 'he was em- as a scout to help keep a check on the often-marauding Comanche Indians. A year later he joined Simms Battalion and -fought through the Civil War with that unit In 1072 he settled at Ft. Smith, previously Ark., remaining there until 1919 Held State Pension Office In 1933 he was appointed state Confederate! pension commission- er and in 1937 was named to the board of trustees ot the Old Sol- diers' Home-at Ardmorc. Indicative of his rugged strength until the last few years senior republican mem- er. Rep. Brown (D-Ga) solved the biggest dilemma before the com- mittee, when he came forward with his "decontrol" amendment. PA TJ. N. Is Official NEW YORK, April .__ The official abbreviation of the United Nations is U. N., accord- ing to Benjamin Cohen of Chile, director of (he U. N. de- partment of public information. Before the security council met in New York last week the hitherto widely accepted form, UNO, was used by many at- taches of the organization. However, formal instructions were issued to all branches that U. N. was to be used. Gen. Palton Honored By Cavalrymen has forced up reports on time the cotton case now the council could ask May margin order yesterday after Bowles directed him to do so. He had refused to put his name to it voluntarily, and the attorney gen- eral's office ruled the measure would not be valid without the secretary's signature. Maybank told a reporter "the best thing that could happen to to decidewhen to take the'Unite States to and this responsibility squarely in the lap of President Truman. The administration had feared the committee might approve a much harsher amendment. But the committee rejected, 15 to 9 the proposal by Wolcott to give industry advisory groups rather than government officials a lar- ger voice in determining when various ceilings should be lifted. Wolcott served notice he would continue his fight for a "stronger" decontrol formula when the bill reaches the house floor. for Bowles to resign. Other ..senators expressed these Cancer Funds Are Coming in Now Direct Appeal by Mail To Be Made Over County The'first few days of the Pon- totoc county part of the nation- wide American Cancer Society campaign 'for funds has brought in Patterson Praises Late Gen. Patfon Memorial Dedicated At ft. Riley Cavalry School, Of Which He Wai ,Grad was appointed pension commis- sioner, they found the 86-year old citizen setting out fruit trees. However, while -he was serving as commissioner he was struck by an automobile in Oklahoma and injured to an extent that he has since not been active. dent. FORT RILEY, Kas., April 4, j charged of War Robert P. Patterson paid tribute today to the late Gen. George S. Patton, Jr., as "a military genius who (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Robertson Is Given Leave, Must Stay Out ol This County Leonard Robertson, whose parole was revoked March 21 af- ter he was charged with assault with intent to kill in Pontoloc county following some gun play involving a highway patrolman, has been given a 60-day leave of absence from the state penitenti- ary by Governor Robert S. Kerr. Robertson was charged after an alleged attack upon highway pa- trol trooper Harvey Hawkins while the officer was investiga- ting a report of trouble at the Broadway club north of Ada. Howard Kirkpalrick was also which in the gun piny inci- of Iran. Council President Quo Tai-Chi of China said he hoped Iran and Russia would setlle all thuir troubles and make further discussion unnecessary. Aussie Furnishes Fireworks But it was Hodgson, fiery, gray diplomat in the best Australian tradition of a minority protester who added the final fireworks to the crisis-laden case. He said Gromyko's walkout a week ago had "prejudiced the work, efficiency and authority of the that the decision to defer the case should not have been made until after full inves- ligalion, that Iran's complainy were being handled as a political incident rather than a whole vital situation. Says Council Dodpod Challenge In his broad accent of the man i-om "down under" ha emphati- cally told his dignified colleagues this case was a challenge lo the security council and in our opin- ion the council did not meet it." He leaned hunched over llie council table ns he spoke in sharp torse sentences and when the vote was taken he kept his hands firmly on the table. Throughout the proceedings Iranian Ambassador Hussein Ala was at the council table and he expressed Iran's acceptance of the Byrnes-sponsored resolution. In short order Egypt, Brazil, Britain, Poland and Mexico lined up behind the Byrnes resolution which provided that on May 6 Hawkins alleged to have for trial. to later years. Although not strong ae gets about some and transacts his business affairs as they re- quire his attention. He has eight sons and .four daughters and a number of grandchildren. >i t i j n v.r A j r v Commodore James K. Varda- J-hese contributions have come man, Jr., retiring naval aide lo Loi'is Long, drive treasurer President Truman, emerged meetings of Rotary, Lions, become effective 10 months after t.ic bill becomes law, applying to worsers "engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for torious today from a ten-weeks batlle for confirmation to the federal reserve board. His appointment is for a 14- year term at a year. The senate gave the Yardman nomination its approval by a vote n[ 66 to 9 yesterday, after a final flurry or arguments on the qual- ifications of the 51-year old Mis- souri banker for the post. All the voles against confir- mation were; cast by Republicans. Kiwonis clubs and the Chamber of Commerce, along with some from individuals outside those or- ganizations. Rex Morrison, county chairman, and his workers are preparing to mail out direct appeals to hun- dreds of persons in the county in the next few days. In the meantime, those plan- ning to contribute to the funds for the growing battle against the second greatest death cause in the U. S. arc invited to mail or bring donations to Long, who is Retail Merchants Association head here. amendment left in the bill a pre- vious v-approved provision which v.-oulcl lift farm prices by includ- ing farm labor costs in govern- ment parity price payments. jw EAT HER] tonight and Friday; warmer Friday. fort to postpone the confirmation ballot until next Tuesday, lost oul 58 lo 17. but Mr. Truman sent Vardaman's nomination to the senate on Jan. Extended hearings followed on his qualifications, then three days of debate on the senate, floor before approval of the appoint- ment went through. A veteran of bolh world wars, vardaman has been Serving as naval lo Mr. Truman since last May. ceremonies dedicating the acade- mic building of the cavalry school here to the memory. His audience included Mrs. Pat- ton, other members of the gen- eral's family, top-ranking mili- tary officers, Gov. Andrew Schoeppel of Kansas, and men who fought with Patton. "The honors we pay him, and the monuments we erect to Patterson said in a prepared talk, "can be only poor reflections of his place in American'history. Patterson said no more fitting family and his farm, place for the memorial could be said that he wanted to chosen than -here at the cavalrv .'r for the care been attacked by Kirkpalrick and Robertson. The trooper suffered a bullet wound on each of two fingers on his right hand. It was almost a week before either of two men was filed on in a justice of peace court. They entered pleas of not guilty and were bound over to district court for r the council could ask new reports on the situation, presumably fj- bolh Russia and Iran, Sir. Alexander Cadogrm of Bri- tain said he believed the settle- ment which Byrnes defer the case until Russian troops can be withdrawn accord- ing to promise would be a "good augury" for the council's' future "Potton Hall" Dedicated At Fort Riley, the of the Cavalry" By JIM PETTERSON FORT RILEY, Kas., April 4. The "cradle of the cavalry" ledicated its academic building oday to the memory of one of its nost illustrious fighting sons he late Gen. George S. Patton, Tr. Moments after a .siren sounded he noon hour. Mrs. Patlon, the 'oneral's widow, lugged at a ord which unveiled bronzed let- ers across the lop of Ihe bulki- and. "Patton Hall" became lie official name of the imeslone structure. More than persons altend- g the ccrcnjony, ln.-ld before six owering pillars of the hall, hoard to the general from 'resident Truman, Secretary of: Var Robert P. Patterson. Gen. acob L. Devers, commander of le army ground forces, and Maj. en. I. D. While, commandant of ic Fort Riley cavalry school. Among those present besides rs. Pallon were olher members f the general's family, top-rank- military officers, Gov. An- "ew Schoeppel of Kansas, mili- ry allaches of two nations, and men who fought with Patton. The ceremonies were marked by music with a Patlon touch. The junction City high school a Cappclla choir sang "God of Bat- tles, -for which General Patton himself penned the words. And in closing, the cavalry school band played "The Second Armored Division writ- ten by Mrs. Patlon. Flags of all the United Nations snapped noisily in a fresh north breeze and at times almost drowned the speakers' words. After the unveiling of the lame, "Patlon on t h e outside of the building, a group of high-ranking military officers moved inside. There Mrs. Pat- ton unveiled a plaque in honor of her husband. Secretary Patterson eulogized Patlon as "a military genius who never failed to contrive the great- est victory at the lowest cost." Slower on Fines County Attorney Wants To Cheek Up First, See If Jail Sentence Appropriate County Attorney Tom D. Mc- Keown is rnakinj; it a point to contact all justice of the peace of- fices in the county and direct them not to accept n fine on a pica of guilty for misdemeanors. He said that a plea of guilty and payment of a fine should not bo accepted until he had boon a chance to determine whether or not a person should pay a fine or servo a jail .sentence. He also said that are too efforts lo build world peace France Lines Up _ After Foreign Minister Fran- Robertson was sentenced t, ull- three terms totaling seven yearsljlsco Castillo Najera expressed for larceny of livestock in Johns- Mexico's support for the resolu- ton county in 1936. He was parol- ed the following year. He requested the governor to give him a leave of absence so that he could arrange for the school. "George Patton, the he said, "was first and last a cavalryman, steeped in the tra- ditions of the cavalry." cavh-y school's mounted service I, T out prison on courses in 1914 and 1915 and lat- I eave of absence er served as director of instruc- tion at the school. WEDEMEYER FLIES TO D.C. riHANGHAI, April Lt. DXJRANT HAS AIR BOARD OKLAHOMA CITY, April 4, An aviation commission appoint- ed tentatively by the city of! Durant to control 'the municipal iirport recently turned over to today. The opinion held lhat in a city without a charter form govern- ment, such affairs must be handl- ed by the mayor and city council. Greater returns ior amount in- Four Held on Drunk, Disturbance Charge Arrested at Carnival Grounds Wednesday Night Four men were- arrested Wed- nesday night at the carnival grounds north of Ada and charg- r-_ -yv- ed with being drunk and disturb- beV T Wedemeyer, com- ing the peace.. The men were ar- rested by members of the high- way patrol and a constable. They were placed in county jail, where they stayed until Thursday morning when they were taken before Percy Arm- strong, justice of peace. Two of the men said their homes were in-Ada while Byng and Fittstown were said to be the homes of the other two. Each of the men made bond and their case will be heard at 2 p.m. Monday, April 15. ENID, April states will be represented by more than youths from 102 school band war tri-state band festival here this weekend. The 14th annual event will at- tract entire bands and drum corps of 82 communities. Festival of his crop before returning to n 1 c i-, n prison. The governor granted the re- icst under the condition that Robertson must remain out of in Patton from the coun--v Time he of American forces in China, left by plane today for Washington, D. C. He will undergo a sinus oper- ation and confer with President Truman, General Marshall, spe- Cleo Black Held Alter Raid Here Officers Report Finding Liquor in.His Home Clco Black, a theater force will be deactivated May 1 it was considered doubtful that General Wedemeyer would return. WASHINGTON, April draft of proposed legislation for merging the armed forces was carried to the White House today by Chairman Elbert Thom- as (D-Utah) of the senate mili- Thomas and Senator Austin ranking minjrily mem- ber of the had an ap- pointment with President Tru- man, presumably to discuss de- taiis of the, plan. Read the Ada News Want Ads. and a city constable after four and a he" tion, French Ambassador Henri Bonnet stated France's agree- ment. Bonnet's announcement made a council majority. The Byrnes resolution took note of the Russian assurances tnat troops would be evacuated from Iran within five-six weeks of the start of their removal on March 24. It accepted the Russian prom- ises as unconditional. Since withdrawal could not be completed any earlier than the specified time, Byrnes said, the council should accept the Russian statement and, in effect, shelve the case. Ambassador Andrei Gromyko Russian representative was ab- sent as usual. Holdenville News Hard Hit by Fire HOLDENVILLE, Okln., April 4, amounting lo sev- many cases where poison 1st r- _ tit fined when ho shouUl have to serve a jail sentence. Ho said that this new method of handling vario is cases should tend to eliminate at least a por- tion of petty crimes and Jaw breaking. atler mur alf pints of tax paid lia- 5 thousand dollars resulted s alleged to have been broke uor was alleged to have been found in his possession. The liquor is reported to have been found at Black's home hich is located at the corner of Fifth and Rennie. Black was arraigned before County Judge Moss Wimbish and made bond. The men making the raid in- Fair and Warmer Is State Forecast By The Associated Prcsi The mercury was climbing back .o the 70's in Oklahoma City af- er a sudden temperature tumble yesterday and prospects were that still warmer weather will ensue tomorrow. The forecast is for fair weather lodny and tomorrow. McAlester turned in the stale's high yesterday will) a rending ol R2 degrees. An early morning minimum of 37'degrees at Guy- mori was the stale's low today. Read the Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST By Bob Dlnnki, Jf. the Holdenville Daily News pub- lishing plant early 'today. Principal damage was lo Ihe press which Rom R. Phillips, owner-publisher, said would be shut down for reconditioning, meanwhile, the paper will use facilities of neighboring plants to continue publication, he said. LJIC 1 cuu ill- ml eluded Ray Goodwin and Ed Dy-I 1e Wazc of undetermined ori- ------1. _ -j was discovered about 1 a. m. son, members of the sheriff's force, and Constable G. R. Cart- wright. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads by city police and was brought unoer control about a. m. The entire building was dama- ged by smoke and water. The loss also included a carload of paper. Mrs. pather Harp, who can't resist giltin' in a line, now has 54 sheets, 26 pairs o' nylons an' a small bank account. Whut is termed "shrewd business" is jail gyppin' th' other feller.   

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