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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Fair tonight and Thursday, some- what cooler; lowest temperatures Panhandle to 55. IHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS School Art Exhibit Now On Display Winners Announced; Pub- lie Invited to Lecture Friday Evening on 'Child Art' the children's art in tht- Adn Climax inn exhibit now Public Library and sponsored by the American Association of Uni- vi-rsily Women, is a lecture on J-riday evenmv at o'clock in the lecture room at tho library. The public is cordially invited to hear Airs. Reulah Fafi'an of the public school svstem of Shawnee who will talk on "Child Art." Mrs. lagan began her art car- eer at Kast Central Slate college, ater attending a teacher's col- lege ilt Kirksville, Missouri: She spends her summers in the study tu art, having spent the past one at the Civie Art Center at Long Beach. California. She was Art Chairman this year for the Ok- j'-i nit: WJY- "I? J'-duc-ational Association. Russ-Iran Replies To Council Easing Tension In Meet Iran Offers to Shelve Case If Russia Will Promise to Get Troops Out by May 6; Says Troops Out in Month and Half ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 the offered today to let M Nations Security Council shelve the Iranian case provided Ru.ssia would give assurances that Rus- from the country uncondi- Snyder Gives Optimistic Output Report Civilian Production Highest Level, Employmen Climbs, Deficit Ebbing jMS; FApSf troops tionally by May 6. The council, having received last minute replies from both Russia and Iran to its inquiries of last Friday on tl slate of negotiations between them, then adjourned at 11- a. in. E. S. T. until 11 a. m. tomorrow. on the 46 Russia said that troop withdrawals from Iran were not. j i J.J- tiji w tJ. C JUJ I, conditional on other negotiations with Iran over such mat- ters as oil and the like. standing. Winners in the exhibit have been selected by Mrs. Carl Land- rum of Tishomingo, former fac- M y ;it Central; Miss Opal Quails, who taught art in the grades at Washington school, and Miss Marjorio Kitchel former art teacher at Hays school.' Miss Hazel Spencer of the Hor- ace Mann High school won first and second places with a still life in water color and a crayon por- Ninth grade Donald Smith, Ada Junior Listen Coffey, Ada second; Clarence T_r t -High, first; Junior High Banter, Ada Junior High, third c. Si-ado Shirley Ann Young, Ada Junior High, first: Charles Lane, Horace Campaign Begun To Save Bread, Fafs For Hungry Peoples At a meeting of the U.S.D.A war board here this morning, plans were made to push the Seventh grade Jimmy Harrel. Horace Mann first; Jo Ann Ada Junior HiKh. second: Carolyn Stone, Ada Junior High, third. Sixth grade _Betty Hays, first; Jim- Troops will be out of the coun- try within a month and a half the council was informed in the message from Ambassador Andrei Gromyko, who however continu- ed his boycott of the Iranian dis- cussion by not actually attending the meeting. Iran Wants Friendly Settlement Iran, in a letter from Ambas- sador Hussein Ala, advised that negotiations with Russia, in ac- cord with a council decision at London, had failed, that Russian interference in Iranian affairs I rector -John loclay, Snyder reported (Continuedjnn Page 2 Column 2) Ponfotoc CouiSy Goes Well Beyond Red Cross Quofa Pontoloc county has gone over its ixert Cross fund quota and the returns aren't yet in Tne goal was SI5.600. with a sizeable portion to remain here or the growing home front work of the organization. Vx-dnesday morning the .Red Cifss office here reported that in Stone- and Allen jominfi tho list of ovir the quota1 districts. ourtoon _ otho- districts are troop that a- bove all Iran wants a friendly peaceful settlement of the situa- tion. American Secretary of State James F. Byrnes asked Ala what he would suggest. The action- packed meeting, expected to pro- duce dramatic results of one sort or another .ever since the council voted its inquiries to Moscow and -----------1 w w aULi tehran and adjourned last Fri- campaign for saving bread and lats. This action is in line with that being taken throughout the nation and is designed to save food to be shipped to starving people in other countries. Appeals are being made to the churches, the civic clubs the schools and all other groups which might aid in the drive to save human beings. Jhc is asking, among other things, that public eating houses serve only one piece of bread with a meal, although the customer may ask for additional slices. The theory is that bread actually put on the table if un- used will not go back into use but will go out with the waste 1 he American people are not ask- ed to deny themselves, but are asked to see that nothing is wast- ed. The situalion in many coun- tries is serious indeed, W. B Johnson, chairman of Ihe local boarc., pomls out. He says starv- ing people do not think right, and to save the peace throughoul Ihe u v world it is necessary to feed part could sav when 72 that he of the people. It is both a prac- I had 6IVioyed every, one of his 60 tinnl Tien 111 o U.. VPH VS in f lift HtmJMnn.. _j_ Along with this factory outpu now exceeding a rate of t a year-noMm ployment has climbed to a poin higher than before VJ-day, when war plants were running ful blast, Snyder told President Tru- man and congress. The feared sharp rise in job- lessness has not occurred, Snydei said, and Private wage payments have climbed back almost to the wartime level of annually. This is a 000 gam since the pastwar slump Job-Seekers Below Estimate ihe aumber of job-seekers in nnn "sti11 below WJ, fenyder estimated. This compares with last fall's official estimates of up to unem- by this spring, The 56-page statement was the most optimistic of six quarterly reports issued so far by the office and recon- FIVE CENTS THE COPY Martin, Oliver Winners In Tuesday's Run-Off Election Tidal Ware Strikes Hawaiian Islands 2) Set and Charles A. Green, Locksmith Many Years, Is Dead C. A. Green, who started as a locksmith when he was 12 and wi-i ijiiajij that strikes and the threat of vi- tiation made the first 1946 quar- ter-sobering and difficult." while production has been it would have been even Better if labor-management dis- putes had not put out the fires in steel furnaces, stopped some automobile assembly lines, cur- tailed production of electric equipment and other vital com- ponents. "These losses slowed down the ports indicate there will be hundreds of deaths Signal Corps Radio from and the left homeless and re- damage as running into (U.S. Panel of 24 Men Drawn Today For Coming Grand Jury Delia Bedford, county court clerk, Tuesday mailed out sum- aru to 24 jurors in Pontotoc s.il! at work and the Red Cross (to on the grand urgo them to tilat.wi11 bo Mon- problem. problem and a humanitarian iin_-i 11 KJ o- i i j.i i jytij ji7j.t; port in at once, despite the coun- I APnl ]5' at 10 a.m. The drawing the 24 several hundred The campaign began slowly handicapped by rainv wcalhei and shortage of workers, but pcr- M.u-m el fort brought a isc in the results and finally j.'te rush thai V.I.-1I the goal figures Cooler Weather' Replacing Warmth Anociotcd Pron illr mil'li.K toward UK unoma. causing the wind to sn.ft to tne liortnwest is expect- f a to bring cooler weather to- predicts from took names names years in the business, died at a local hospital Wednesday morn- ing. Green retired not long ago when his eyes began failing. He had lived in Ada since 1920 .Funeral services will be held rhursday at p. m. from Smith flow of consumer goods to the market and increased the infla- tionary pressure which stem from shortages in the face of huge de- mand. The man-days lost in January due to industrial strife equalled one day of the month for ev5rv non agricultural worker and delayed "by many weeks" the return of some needed goods to market, the reconversion chief S31Q. Should Rise Rapidly Barring further serious work stoppages, however, production should rise rapidly during tho second quarter of 1946, and 'jobs should be available for most of he predicted were active e jobseekers early in February- there may be now The number may increase within the J.J.VJUI OI1IJLH j. i, vvj.nj4ii vile Funeral Chapel, Rev.. Mitchell months, but the aver- Epperson and Rev. Vernon Pen- delton officiating; burial will be n Memorial Park. Green, 77 at the time of his d.eath, was born at Marshfield, T was a silversmith. j? i Green started learning he locksmith business. Later he moved to Crawford, Tex., eoine verland by covered wagon three years there he mov- Guy men. a low of -J8 trerm-s in Okliihoma for 24 hours. wiih a top of H3, and reported both the ex- NO Here This Week Meeting place Tuesday morning when Sheriff Clyde Kaiser and Court Clerk Bedford drew Ihe names from a jury box. Twelve men will serve ns grandjurors. Notices have been mailed to the men, commanding them to appear before the district court A. court official said that the last grand jury held in Jr-ontptoc county was in 1938. The official pointed out that there is i limited amount of money in the court fund at the present time. Records at the court house how that there is in ho court fund now. The length 'mC, hS f3nd is in sion will determine the amount of money needed. Men selected on the grand jury panel include Bill Belvers BcntLe.y, Street Davig ov- d to McGregor, Tex., and spent ?ominfi Ada Sept. 1, 1J19. and being 'employed for several years at Coffir.an, Bobbitt and Sparks Hardware. Later he was at McKendree 'Hardware beSame an expert -in safe and also was an experienc- ed gunsmith.. He said in 1940 supposed he had worked on "millions of locks" Survivinfi are the widow, Mrs. Katie Green, 214 East Fifteenth- Iwn T ___ i TT A ------r juaiaii x- _ the coming quarter will probably not be above Snyder forecast that the federal deficit for tms fiscal year, ending June 30, will be "several billion nnn j than the 000 deficit mentioned in the Jan- uary budget estimates. The report attributed this showing to the high-level of na- tional income, which has kept tax payments at a good level, and the lact that war expenditures are being cut faster than had been expected. T Hunter, Wednesday that the rcg- uldr weekly Chamber of Com- "Ot be hcld The reason for the luncheon this be" Painters have been busily ;it this week painting and re- the AldriclRc hotel Keari t.'ie Ada pot, Ralph Pool and Roy L Lol- ar a I of Ada; George Breeden Kmmit Bradford, E. H. Hudson' A. l Lawson, Rube Murphy, H' K Thompson. Herbert L. Grif- fith, Oren Phillips and H F Thompson all of Roff; C W Nef son-of Stratford, W. A. Henson of S, Ada Route of Ada; two sisters, Mrs. Marv Anderson, Polk, Mo., and Mrs Frances Jenkins, Bolivar, Mo. Mosl Oklahomans Okay for Driving Less Than 12 Per Cent Of Applicants Fail.or Have Restrictions Ordered Several Solid Gains Among the "solid gains" of the just closed Snyder listed- Major issues of wage and price adjustment have been met in a wry to stimulate production with- out losing vital ground to the rce of inflation. ''Labor management contracts established in many major indus- tries under collective bargaining should assure uninterrupted pro- duction. "Vigorous programs have been formulated to meet the most crit- ical shortages, most notably in textiles and housing." While saying these factors may relieve inflationary pressure to some extent, Snyder singled out inflation as "the single most ser- ious threat to successful comple- tion of reconversion." The reconversion director said the new wage-price policy should small effect on living costs as a whole and added that the Scholastic Contests Set East Central Resumes In- terscholastic and Track Meet for High Schools East Central is getting ready for the first interscholastic mee in four years. The scholastic con- tests will be held Friday. Satur- day the track and field contests will be held. Track Fast The cinder track at Norris ineld has been rolled and put into excellent condition. The football field has been mowed and made ready for field events Everything is in excellent shape and the only thing that could slow Hie track meet at this time would be a heavy rain. Entries Twenty eight schools have en- tered in the contests, and fourteen have entered in athletics. While this is not as large a number of entries as in pre-war years, additional entries may be expected before the start of the meet. College officials say that the car shortage is responsible for fewer entries than in pre-war years. Many individuals have old Freeholder Board To Meet Thursday Night Mayor Calls Meeting for Organixafion, Getting Busy On f Charter Revision Study; 60 Days to Submit Result freeholders voters of the city. its eight members -by Join Dodds In New Line-Up First Political Campaign For Each; Bbard of Free- holders Also Selected Ada voters Tuesday designated Ray Martin and Burrell Oliver as successful candidates for places on the city commission, to join Luke Dodds who in tho primary two weeks earlier had clinched his race for mayor. Martin, who became city clerk and commissioner of finance bv appointment on Jan. 1, 1945, will ba the only "veteran" on the com- mission. Neither Dodds nor Oliver has held elective office in the past and the campaiRn just concluded was the first Martin had ever made. Inlo Office in May Ihe new city commission will 2 office in early May. The voters also elected two men from each ward to a board of freeholders to study the city charter for revision. Martin stood off the challenge of Drew Thomas, making his first Official Vote 5 3 -J flommar Who Gave )eafh March Order, Executed in Manila By WAYXE RICHARDSON MANILA, April Lt. jen. Masaharu Homma, a b'actk lood over his head and a white rget over his heart, died before U. S. army fir Mayor Guy Thrash has called a meeting of the board for Thurs- day night of this week at 7-30 o clock i'h his office. At that time the board mem- bers will select from among themselves a chairman and a secretary and start working out plans for study of the citv charter. Two Were On '32 Board Two members of the freehold- er board of 1932 are on the new H. Ebey, who served -3 -5 -1 -2 -3 -1 ;i-3 4-1 ni (ill 1.17 J.1.1 .12 as 105 711 111 35 109 Oli 81 76 111 .tl 107 10! ion 2.1 55 .15 111 111 8-1 G.I 47 101 11 70 72 100 K.I 77 10.1 14 141 144 M 102 Ml 11.1 chairman before, is morning; who 8ervcd the end. The stocky Japanese, who was General Mac-Arthur's foe in the 1942 battle of the Philippines, died for ordering the death march on Bataan and condoning widespread atrocities in the Phil- ippines. and Joe as secre- y to take long j The execution took place at s an H.; n c drives, and many school busses Los Banos, are so worn that they are no longer dependable. Two bus loads of.seniors coming to Senior Day here last week didyiot reach their destination because of bus breakdowns. Complete Schedules Complete schedules of all events are printed elsewhere in this issue of the Journal. Judges College faculty members will be judges of curricular events in then- field of specialization The track and field events will be run oil under the supervision of Athletic Director Mickey Mc- Bride and Coach Ed Wilds I Ma 20 miles south of Charles 5. Brydia Visiting in Ada Now Resident of Pontioc, III., Was Living in Ada In 1910 Charles S. Brydia, who was OKLAHOMA CITY, April 3 i on Page 4, Column 4) Oklahoma highway pa- today that less than 32 per cent of the ap- plicants for driver's licenses ex- amined during January and Feb- ruary failed or had restrictions placed on their driving. n 14'008 examined, or 10.9 per to pass _did Pass Oil Rivalry in New Phase, Say Reds MOSCOW, April 3, ing one third of a page to a re- t> rpniivo ,t "tlle Question of oil in lion, aqnH examina- Anglo-American Izves- a drivint for tia said today that oil rivalry had a driving test with mechanical defects in their vehicles. Only nine per cent of the total number of applicants were given licenses, which pre- remedies for physical dis- aoinlies. The number of applicants fail- JWEATHER! J ______ _ -Fair tonight and i'-u..-dsy. somewhat et.oler; low- Urr.nira lures Panhandle to oa southeast tdiiifiht; cooler adie Thursday. in Pan- "i'sS V? MXSSKxS .1 Joe Walker is his sister! An pro APriI 1B -y con- decora- for ficstible nutrients end of the war. a new phase sir.ce the Housing Measure Pasf Commiffee Truman's Emergency Leg- islation Approved Today WASHINGTON, April Truman's emergency housing legislation, includiric for building als subsidies, was unanimously approved today by the senate banking committee. This bill also provides for price ceilings on existing homes. Republicans supported the measure after losing 12 to 6 an amla at about 1 a.m. It was there that Lt. Gen. Tomovuki Yamashita had been hanged in disgrace. Homma had headed the Japanese in victory in the Phil- in defeat Another Jap Hanged Thirty minutes after Homma idled, Lt. Gen. Hikotaro Tajima was hanged for the atrocity stay- ing of three American naval filers in May, 1944. Without perceptible emotion liomma strode to the execution scene between an escort formed m double ranks. A chaplain walked with him .Homma stood silent, his arms bound behind him, as the officer in command read the charge :mdmg and sentence. Appeal Rejected J.he conqueror of Bataan and L-orregidor was convicted by an American military tribunal in Manila Feb. II. The United btales supreme court rejected an appeal from the death sentence M- A" ,few weeks later General MacArthur upheld the tribunal's Elected in the vote of Tuesday were: Ward Maine's ana Wendell Thomas; Ward jyd and Dr- c- F- Spen- cer; Ward Walker and Hensley; Ward McMillan and W. H. Ebey The board has (JO days in'which to prepare recommendations for revision or amendment of the 1912 charter, recently under criticism as being inefficient and handicapping city officials in Un-iir efforts to administer city affairs under vastly changed con- ditions. Serve Without Pay The members serve without pay but can hire necessary cleri- cal help Results of the voting in the two wards where more than two candidates were on the list were- 452; Thomas, 445; O F w i Wendell Albin. 127; Clyde Click, ]52. Ward 3-Red Walker, 378; Tom Goodman, 161; Joe Hensley 244 Each ward has two representa- tives on the honi-r! ives on the board. offered Ihe motion and said he will take his fight for it to the-senate floor. Capehart said Housing Expedi- te matter how the English r Wyatt could start the monopolies endeavor to obstruct eo.vfp and fho _ i COlne back fm- innt-fa i t IAJ.IW tion roller skates and shoes. offensive of American capital, the serious shifting of posilions m the struggle for oil 'becomes and apparent as bene- fitting the the govern- ment newspaper said. One of the most obvious fea- ..jures supporting this reasoning jlzvestia continued, was a British- 'American agreement of Sept. 24 1945, by which the paper said American oil industrialists not nnn? project firm contiol of American's oil output put gained recognition for their long-advocated principle in re- gard to "new which Iz- vestia said the American press described as Far East. come back for more money if he needed it. The house had refused any money for subsidies, which Mi- Truman called the "very heart" of his program, and also cut out ceiling prices on existing residen- action, declaring he could "find no circumstances of extenuation- alter a full study of the case A short time before MacArthur announced his decision, Homma's wife visited the Allied command- er at his Tokyo headquarters. She did not appeal for the life of her husband, but said his death be a great loss to the wo rid. j Today, Mrs. Homma was re- ported ill of typhus in Tokvn Fattier of Two Of State Newsmen Dies bv, i71 voles. Martin got 359 anj. Thomas ballots. In a race that has been hotlv contested since it first opened early this year. Oliver for several years an employe of the street department and later sorvinc with the Senbces in the South- west Pacific, climaxed his first political campaign by unseating J. D. Willoughby, public works commissioner, with a vote of to The total of votes cast in this race topped the ?nunesday foil some 600 voles below the primary bal- loting. Martin carried 30 precincts to Thomas' 6: Oliver swept 14 boxes to Willoughby's 2. Official Vole Totals There were voters who stamped their approval on Dodds campaign, allhouijh this time he had no opposition. The official vote totals in tho Tuesday election are- Finance Commissioner tin, Thomas, Public Works Commissioner- Oliver, Willoughby, Freeholders, Ward Maines, 452; Wendell Thomas Mar- t typhus in Tokyo Imperial University hospital. The ttommas daughter, Michiko told Kyodo news agency: "The news of the execution of my father lock a weight off mv mind as I have pitied (grieved because of) father's irritation In awaiting execution." Burchfield, 74, Of Bristow Passes BRISTOW, Okia., April 3, OB R. Burchfiel. 74, -.retired .Bnstow farmer and father of two Oklahoma newspapermen, died at his nome here today A native of Cove City, Ark., Burchfiel came to Indian terri- tory 63 years ago and settled at Cnosita, Wagoner county He and his wife, Rebecca Morton Burchfiel, were to have observed their next July. 50th wedding anniversary STILLWATER, April 3, Miss Euteva Pugh, petite brunet- te r class co-ed In addition to seeking gram, senate leaders hoped-for action on the Wagner-Ellender- lait Jong range program. It would aid cities to redevelop blighted continue sup- port of low-rent public housing and extend federal mortgage guarantees to new fields. Action on the long range bill was defer- red until tomorrow. Mod.flinf. York, as the first of five at Oklahoma A. and M. college. Two groups of five beauty Ca dictates representing campus Sanitations were selected by Powers from 21 entries. Miss Pughs picture, along with those or tour other queens, will appear s, w appear in the college yearbook, Ihe Red- One of his sons, Henry is a reporter for the Oklahoma City limes, and another. Ed, is a Unit- ed Press bureau editor at Okla- homa City. Surviving also are four other sons. Fred and Oscar of Porter- Calif.; Raymond of Brislow and Tanl of St. Louis; three daughters, Airs. E. N. Barlow and Mrs. Ernest Lessley, both of Bris- low, and Mrs. Floyd K. Marston of Baton Rouge, La., and a broth- er, Tant of Cedarville, Ark Ar.otncr son. Lt. R. D. Burchfiel' was killed in action over Ger- many in April. 19.55 Services will be at 2 p. m. Thursday at Bristow with burial in Memorial Park at Tulsa. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads 445; Orley F. Albin, 127; Clyde A. Click, 152. Freeholders. Ward F. Spencer, 249; C. W. Floyd 277 Freeholders, Ward W "Red" Walker, 378; Tom Good- man, 161: Joe W. Hensley, 244 Freeholders, Ward II EbAey, 483; Claude McMillan, 57fi! for county and state offices must be done in tho five days beginning April 22 and the races will be on in earnest ookmg toward the early July primary election. NEW Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was made an honorary fellow for life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art yesterday for the part lie played overseas in saving art treasures menaced by Wai- Eisenhower in an acceptance speech, said the honor belonged to Ihe men and officers of ihe army whose love for priceless treasures pesisled throughout the fears of battle." TH' PESSIMIST Bob Another good way t' make n enemy is t1 meet a friend an ask if he's been sick. Ther's a heap o' difference between allerin' a husband an a last year's dress.   

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