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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 28, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 28, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Name-calling often means trouble, but the name-calling at today's C. of C. program was a pledge of faith in Ada as was 'stood up for' to assure Ada a chance at bargain hanger Fair tonicht anil Friday, continu- ed mild somewhat warmer THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 29 J ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1916 FIVE CENTS THE COPY ADA ASSURED CHANCE TO BUY BIG HANGAR Russia Backtracks Some On Walk Out From UNO Council District Seniors Here Friday As Guests of College Hundreds of Boys and Girls To Enjoy Features, See College in Action Friday the- high school boys and girls of the East Central district, a thousand strong, will take over the Kast Central State National Spot On H. H. Bull Hereford Heaven Animal To Bc Auctioned Saturday In S.D., Over ABC Network Another Hereford Heaven bull makes the national airwaves Sat- time at Burke. S. D. The animal is C. Royal Rupert Gth. Turner-bred bull owned by L. P. Carpenter nnd selected by Bill Likins of the Flying L. college campus in the postwar re- Ranch and Dean W. L. Blizzard, Still Undecided II Russia's Absence To Paralyze Council Unity of Action Among Major Powers Still Recog- nized as Heart of Organiza- tion ntwal of the annual Senior Day that has been a feature of the spring schedule for years. The v.-eathcr outlook is entirely favorable fair nnd warmer tic- ir.g in with plans for holding the noon-day picnic luncheon on the attractive cnmpus. The youths will start arriving early and come streaming in to the carr.pu; all during the morn- ing. Plenty To Ho And See There v.-ill be plrntly for them to tio nnrl and at 10 o'clock they will he invited into the audi- torium for n program of snappy entertainment features provided bv the various departments of the rollcge. mov Oklahoma A. and M. college, for a very special occasion. That occasion will be an auc- tion sale at Burke to be broadcast Saturday at a.m. by the ArnL-ricnn Broadcasting company is there will corr.e the luncheon, more in- formal time and at p. m. presentation of a comedy by the members, of the college speech department. See College In Action Central clashes will bc running on schedule nnd other college activities will be moving normally jo that the visitors can see the college here as it is in its daily schedule. For thn e are athletically inclined the gymnasium facilities ar.d thp tennis courts will be available. For those with less strenuous tastes, the dorms can be inspected, the class room buildings visited and the campus, ro-A- approaching its most beauti- ful awaits those who pre- fer stroll about over the lawns ar.d_ through the shadid areas. ir.c Ada Junior Chamber of Commerce is assisting the college authorities v.'ith the luncheon. Eart Central officials pay that (including KADA in Ada) in a gigantic benefit sale to help fi- nance n Burke community hos- pital undertaking. The Burke sponsors of the project a few days ago bought C. R. H. Gth from Carpenter. They also rushed pictures of the fine Hereford off to the post- card people to have his likeness printed on several thousand cards being used in promoting the auction in the Burke area. So another Hereford Heaven bull takes the national spotlight taking for a background, there's no telling how high the bidding will go for the valuable animal. Denfon, Cox And Tulsan Plan For New Bus Service TULSA. Okla.. March bus line deal will give Tulsa its first through ser- vice to Oklahoma's "Hereford Heaven" when new equipment can be obtained and operating rights set up. Announcement last Height of the purchase of the Union Transpor- tation company capital stock was made by Duncan McRne, Tulsa, and B. D. Denton and John Cox, Ada, officials of the Dcnco Bus j compa- y. The slock ge :n furnishing contact with poten- tial students. Nation's on Travel Binge These Days or No Tircj, And Paying in Human Life CHICAGO. March The nation's traffic deaths in Feb- ruary totaled 2.-550, a -55 percent :r.crea5e over the same month a year apo and only 7 percent bc- JT.C traffic's deadliest February :n 1341. the national safety coun- cil said today. Tr.e council said that on the basis oj last month's record, it stood pat on its prediction of a near-record toll of traffic death: in If-iG "unless the driv- ers and pedestrians decide to do something about it." The council said latest infor- mation rr.ileaqe indicates on rural that January highways in- creased sharply, even exceeding vear of 19-il by 7 inciicnti's." the council or no tr.e prc percent. "This paid, "th tires, car a 'ravel luni: ;n lif no going on Iranian matter. Union busc's now operate be- tween Tulsa and Sapulpa, to Ok- mulRee and Henryetta and to Holdenville, Okcmah and Wc- wokn. The company will seek author- ity from the corporation commis- sion to purchase operating rights between Holdenville and Ada. Gromyko in Visit To Red Consulate Pleasant But Evasive About UN Council Walkout NEW YORK, March 28, Russian Ambassador Andrei Gromyko, who walked out of the security council meeting yester- day, emerged from his quarters on the 15th floor of the Hotel Plaza today and visited the Soviet consulate. Affable and appearing well- rested despite the fact he had not retired until after 2 a. m., the ambassador parried reporters' questions as to whether he had been in communication with any- one during the night about the nnd paying for it 'Accident' May Have Been Murder TAHLEQUAH. Okla.. Mar. 28, were in separate jails to'iav charged with murder sr.d state troopers were investiga- ting v.hat was fust reported as nn accident in which .V.IrAorth was fatally in- jur.-ti 21. County Attmni-y Houston B. Tee.'.i-c lii-niy Isaccas. 45, nnd Mtlvin Arthur Cook Young, 23, were trie tr.cn Isac- cas was in mil at Stilwell and Young was held here. Ashworth was taken to a Prairie Grove. Ark., hospital with the report he was injured in n traffic State Troopers II. T. r and Emmett Me- Intr.Oi rani was 1-viJcnce of foul iWEATHER OKLAHOMA Fair tonight and Friday, continued mild with somewhat warmer Friday; low- est tonight 45 northwest to 50 cast and south. 'I sleep at he said. To another question, he rt pli- ed, "it's a beautiful day, isn't it." At the consulate, he said "I don't know" when asked if he would attend the executive ses-. sion of the council this afternoon. Rent Controls On In More Cities TULSA. Okla.. March K. Marshall, area OPA rent- als officer, disclosed today that Hcndrix Wolf, Stillwater attor- ney, had been recommended to head an office to be opened in the Payne county seat, April 1. Marshall said registration of Stillwater rental largely by Oklahoma A. and M. college students would begin about April 15, with similar ac- t.on In follow at Cu.shing, Yale ;.iul L'ontnili will effective Mon- day, with rents frozen as of March 1 last year, Marshall add- ed EsUmlishmcnt of the Stillwnter office r.pparently was promoted by PIT.tests from vete-ans attend- college that high rentals 'Acre forcing many to withdraw. If all the land in the world were equally divided, each per- sons would receive approximately 18 acres. By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER j NEW YORK. March 28, Russia backtracked slightly today on its sensational walk out from the United Nations security coun- cil, but the council still a critical decision on whether Rus- sia's absence from Iranian discus- sions would virtually paralyze it. Secretary of State Byrnes and Edward "R. Stettinius conferred with their advisers at length in preparation for this afternoon's secret session of the council. In- dications were that Byrnes would insist that no single member, however powerful, had the right to hamstring the council's work and that hearing of the Iranian case should proceed with or with- out Soviet Ambassador Andrei Gromyko in attendance. Unity Is Kry On the other band some pre- session speculation revolted around the point that unity of action among the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China is the heart of the new world peace organization, and the phy- sical absence of Russia from any meeting was seen by some as per- haps a paralying "break in this unity. Experts 'said the situation is for which the United Nations [charter makes no provision what- ever. Russia's backtracking came in two developments today follow- ing up the tense moment at -yes- terday's council meeting when Gromyko strode impassively from the chamber under his instruc- tions from Moscow not to stick around if and when Iranian Am- bassndor Hussein Ala started speaking. Withdrawal Limited Today Soviet Professor Boris Stein attended a meeting of a committee of experts charged I with working out rules of order and procedure for the council, signaling specifically for the first time the limited nature of the Russian withdrawal. Soon afterward Victor Un- lanchcr. press secretary of the Russian consulate, where Gromy- ko makes his headquarters, said unequivocally that Russia had not "walked out on the United Nations" but only on the Iranian dispute. Russia, he said, would be represented at the secret coun- cil gathering today. Subsequently a Soviet official said there would an announce- ment later as to whether Gramy- ko personally would attend. -tc Charges May Be Filed in Killing County Authorities Investi- gate Fittstown Shooting At noon Thursday, no charges had been filed in connection with the fatal shooting of Ervin Loman late Tuesday afternoon at Fitts- town. County authorities made no statements as to when the case would bc filed, but tin- attorney f.r the defense said that he ex- pected charges to be filed Thurs- day. Russian Officer Held on Espionage Charges Lt. Nicolai Grcgorvich Hcdin, left, 20-year-old Russian Naval Officer, who was arrested In Port- land, Oregon, on espionage charges, as he was about to board n Soviet vessel in the harbor, is shown with U. S. Marshall Jack Cauficld, Charges will possibly be filed I in a city justice of the peace court. A thorough investigation of the circumstances surrounding the rase was made Wednesday by members of the sheriff's force, who started the invcstigntion soon nfter the shooting was re- ported to their office late Tues- day. Reaches 1.59 Inches Rnins that fell Wednesday add- ed .li.'t of an inch to the rainfall of tin- preceding two davs and brought the week's total "to 1.59 inches. The skies cleared and after a temperature- drop to 411 
                            

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