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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 27, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 27, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             The lost cotton season was definitety not tailored for Pontotoc counly, for there have been only 869 bales ginned compared to bales for tH. 1944 crop, and that last wasn't a big one Partly cloudy panhandle, showers and thundrr storms remainder of state today and tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 283 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 1916 Slow Rains Soak State, Aid to Wheat Heaviest Rainfall Where Matt Needed, Weather Due to Clear by Thursday 11V The- laird Slow, s o a king rains fell throughout Oklahoma's wheat bcit tod.iv. bringing an end to a pc: aid of d.-> weather in western and ;uuthwc.-.tern Oklahoma. Ada Shares Rainfall Aria's hare of rainfall mounted as flowers fell during Th" ramgauge- he-re had .di! of an inch bv 7 Tij.-d.iy. added dur- ing night, and with Wednesday's total yet to be re- ported. Temperatures remain- ed moderate, ranging from Tuesday's high of CO to the night's low of fil degrees. Heavier.! rainfall apparently w .n hi-ir it v.-.e: most needed t.'.- south-.-.-.- t. win-re mi-he-.-; anel Allus Must e.f tin- i.-.-.t of the- state ri'ci-ivd from a trace to ir.ore than a half inch. The area r.Iong the- Texas line- the West. ill. ri reeeived needed with Sayre ii-porting a, dri.-.'ling r.un there eif a half inch or more, and inore falling. The r-torrn seemed to be backing up :n the state, with Buffalo, in the northwest i o r n e r. getting u i s newer during the middle of the morning afte-r it had been clear their earlier. Fair. Warmer Thursday Trie official state-wide forecast calls for the rams te> continue dur.r.g the fore-noon in the cen- tral .section, and in the south and east during the day. with clear- ing weather in the west. Tomor- row is expected to be fair and warmer. Rainfall in Oklahoma City totaled .74. at Lindsay Ard- .01. EIJ: City McAlester Takes First Air Hop or 115 Aunt Lizzie Dcvcrs. who at 115 says she lias survived nine hus- bands, realized one of her cherished ambitions nt Sapulpn Okla wiien she a birthday airplane n portion ol the Cherokee "trail of lears." the tortuous route by which she came In Oklahoma as a girl. Here she chats with Clyde Kirby li.imer an pilot, who said she showed no trepidation Vlier before or durini! the flight. Offer of All-Metal Hangar To Be Theitie of Thursday Meeting FIVE CENTS THE COPX No Agreement On Iranian Formula Byrnes, Gromyko, Bonnet Fail to Reach Compromise In First Meeting; Gromyko May Boycott UN Council NEW YORK, March United Nations Se- curity Council's subcommittee, appointed to find a com- promise formula in the Iranian case, adjourned after meeting an hour and a half today with the announcement that "no agreement has yet been reached." Man Is Slain At Fitlstown Ervln Loman Fatally Shot In Affray, Orb Murray Gives Self Up to Officers County authorities Wednesday .vere Investigating the circum- itanees that led up to and cluded the fatal shooting at 'ittstown late Tuesday aftcr- loon of Ervin Loman, 34, Fitts- own resident vorker. and oil field Two Road Projects In County Back On PRA Approved List OKLAHOMA CITY. March 27, U. S. public roads ad- ministration lias nppi'oved seven (if l.'t state-federal hiiilnvav oro- j i. .-ii j, m fsi if .31. Pone a Citv a'trace -ind W-iv s Oklahoma from which it -ttinporanly withheld approval Ada Mutt Decide Right Away on War Assets Cor- poration Offer of Big Hangar The Chamber of Commerce meeting Thursday will be the oc- casion, but the subject matter is of general concern, so that all invited to Orb Murray, reported also to an oil field worker, gave him- elf up to thi.1 sheriff's office fol- owing the affray. The sheriff's office was called at p.m. Tuesday and told there had been a shooting at Fittstown and that a man had been shot. Officers Found Loman Dead Deputies Jim Rogers, R a y Goodman and Ed Dyson hurried to Fittstown and found Loman dead when they arrived, they said Wednesday. They made a search for Mur- ray, then returned to Ada to find him waiting for them at the sher- .....ficc: they quoted him as that there had been some Secretary of State Byrnes would make no statement. He referred reporters to Porter Mc- Kecvcr. press attache of the American delegation, who said lie had been authorized to say: "No agreement has been reach- ed yet. The meeting is over. They adjourned at p. m." (iromykei Silent Andrei Gromyko, Russian rep- resentative on the council and the sub-committee said repeated- ly: r.ok.i .17. Lighter! rain was in the east n-it the storm M'Jirat Only th-.- panhandle area had b-en hut crop observers jli II1[ "f h'gh constructiei'n moving in that s- Kcrr said Projects approved, Kerr said em his return from Washington, included in Ottawa county, ere that '-prospect.1; are the tw" 1'onlotoe county and one best in years" Grcenbug dam- ln McCurtain and Choctaw ace :s prevalent throughout the eu: but moisture to make Contracts already had been let, ,i, IIUIL mere iiuu ucen some S Parl the Dewing for some .time noon hour program. There will be explanation of the offer to Ada of a war surplus all-metal hangar, 100 by 130 feet in dimensions, crated and ready fur shipment, that cost the gov- ernment and can be had by Ada for wheat crow. "piuiT hot dry subject to PRA approval, and the: weather to follow to kill the in- I that work on them I City officials will also explain some of the factors rangements that would have to be made for the shipping, for concrete flooring, for setting up steel structure and related .vets minimize damage Icoultl rcnv proceed at an early the-v said. h ;date. Still withheld was PRA appro- Wooc-.wa.-d. squarely in the. center of t :e northwest wheat -slx other projects, two in country, repoited a half-inch I Wagoner county and one each in rain with n-.o.-e falling there, j Choc-taw. Cherokee and Pitt.sburg Cneioxee. iij> to the Kansas line.........'" if.to reported a half inch rain. needed the moisture a long winter drouth, but Cherokee- ar.-a was reported :n Rood condition but able to use additional surface moisture. A- HiT.ne.ssi.y. also in the if an right th'-re v.-as .42 inch of moisture, just the counties. "We think most of the rest will be approved when we have work- ed our further matters with the PRA." Kerr said. They will invite questions about the offer and the place such a hangar would have in put- ting Ada's big airport north of the city into use. Ada must decide whether or not the offer will be accepted and must decide right away, as dis- position of the hangar can not be deferred indefinitely. There were 40 hangars made Approval of the projects, on I -'ivailable at Granite City, 111., by which some federal money will be spent. held up by PRA pendini; the working out of a cost ceiling to limit liiqh construction arr.o-.irit needed to offset some costs throughout the- nation C.-ecnbug damage reported to be of there in the -.ve community. Highest temperature in tlie r'.at.- last L'l hours was 74 at M-rAlrrter. Guvmon had the overni-ht low 43. Truman Trains For Horseshoe Pitching President Starts Early Morning Wolks For Con- ditioning _ WASHINGTON'. March 1 President Truma-i has r.tart- i-' spring tiaming fen- the horsc- seas. ,11 by taking early morning walks around the streets of Washington. Rigsbys' Vacation But Broken Leg Hasn't Kept "Big Brother" Away From His Business About Monday evening Mis. C. R. Kigsby was busily packing for a vacation trip with her husband and children te> Cali- fornia when someone called her from the- Hudson Dealer's show- in and garage- tell her that Brother" Higs- he husband, by had slipped on the grease rack and broken his leg in two places. Of course, plans for the trip the War Assets corporation and only about a third of them are coming to the Southwest, officials here have learned; there were many more bids than could be filled by the 40 hangars. What kind of financing would be required to get the hangar t now, and whether Ada is ready i te> ge> ahead will be taken up at the Thursday meeting. Shidehara Says Others to Ban War Predicts Nations Eventual- ly to Renounce War As Now Jap Constitution Docs TOKYO, March mier Shidehara today told the new war investigation associa- tion ''There will come a time" when all nations will renounce war as Japan does in the draft of were cancelled and Mrs. Rigsbj its new constitution. Shidehara, president of the as- was at work Tu day morning, and has been ever between him and Loman. A third man, whose name was given as Davenport, was also held. He was at first reported to have been involved in the affair, as being with Murray, and to have been knocked down so that he told officers he did not sec the shooting. 45 Automatic Drain-Weapon A .45 automatic was said by the officers to have been the fatal weapon. Davenport, they learned later, drove Murray to Ada in his car, and returned then to Fittstown, where he was found later by the officers and brought in to be questioned in the investigation. The men are said to have been in a cafe at Fittstown, then to have gone outside where the af- fray took place. Loman, 34, is survived by his widow and other relatives. Huge Loss Caused In Warehouse Fire Almost Pounds Of Tobacco Worth Almost Million Dollars Destroyed LANCASTER, Pa.. March 27. out of control for more than two hours, a general alarm fire destroyed nearly 3.- pounds of tobacco and wrecked a four-story warehouse early today. Police said it was one of the costliest fires in the history of this eastern Pennsylvania tobac- co center. Tobacco company spokesmen estimated loss at close to Flames sweeping through the warehouse, owned by the Penn- sylvania railroad, generated such heat and caiscd such a rapid ex- haustion of air that steel shutters bolted to windows were blown off. "I have nothing at all to say." The sub-committee, made up of U. S.. French nnd Russian rep- resentatives, will report to the chairman of the council this af- ternoon. Secretary of State- Byrnes, Soviet ambassador Andrei Gremi- vko, and French Ambassador Henri Bonnet went into session in Bonnet's suite on the 14th floor of the Pierre hotel shortly after 11 o'clock te> try to reach semie decision in time for a report to the security council at 3 p. m. today. One Proposal Advanced One possible way out of the difficulty which American of- ficials appeared willing to accept was a proposal that Iran Ambas- sador Hussein Ala should be call- ed by the security council mere- ly to present his views on wheth- er his government would suffer if the Iranian case were delayed, as Russia demands, until April Even this, however, may not be acceptable to Gromyko, whose in- structions from Moscow evidently call for him to get a delay or else boycott all council meetings at which Iranian subject is discussed with an Iranian rep- resentative participating. If Russia persists in his abso- lute refusal to agree to hear any statement of Ala and if the Unit- cd Is equally ndamant a- bomb test this summer. concrete bleaks, rnstirnn sewer pipe, clay sewer pipe, millwork, gyp-ium board and lathe, hard- wood flooring, softwood plywood and prefabricated houses, sec- tions, and panels. Wyatt, National Housing ex- pedltor, sai.l he was convinced that yesterday's CPA order is stringent enough to release ma- terials for tho 2.700.000-home goal set by President Truman. The order forbids the start of any new construction or repairs obs ranging from --.ing to for an industrial ex- press approval of one of the new field offices. Building Costs To Rise In reiterating his plea for in subsidies. Wyatt told the banking committee yes- terday that even with such "pre- mium payments" he is afraid home building costs arc to go up sotm more. The former Louisville mayor ?ald "hout the best that can be liope. No one can sav now that to keep housing costs it... __ _ __ (Continued on Pago 2 Column 5) Russia Will Turn Pu-Yi to China, Situation Easing By SPENCER MOOS A CHUNGKING, March 27.-W) small j agreed today to release 1' for n c'v Henry Pu-Yi. former puppet governor of Manchuria, to China, ns this country's vice minister of foreign affairs reported the re- cently tense Sino-Soviet situation had "eased." Lieu Chieh, the vice minister, was asked by correspondents if the crisis in relations between China and Russia had passed. "I don't think I can make any categorical he re- plied. "We've never given up Subsidy Plea On Housing Is Opposed Meanwhile CPA Rushes Of- fices to Administer Sweep- ing New Materials Controls WASHINGTON, March Boss Wilson W. Wyatt's renewed plea for sub- sidies to cpur the output of scarce building materials bump- ed into opposition today from the United States Chamber of Commerce. A statement by the chamber's board of directors said "we do not believe the highly controver- sial subsidy proposal should be rein.sertcd" in the measure de- signed to provide new- homes by tho end of next year. The chamber endorsed the bill passed by th'? house, saying in a statement prepared for the sen- ate banking committee that it give.! Wyatt "ample authority." Klsewhen. on the h o u s i n p front, the h >use by a vote nf 355 to I sent to the senate a cmerg.-ncy appropriation bill. It is intended to finance more temporary homes for veterans and provide funds for the civilian production ad- ministration and other agencies to carry out the administration's housing program for the balance of the current fiscal year. Prompt senate concurrence was pre- dicted. Hurry New Control Sct-Up Meanwhil..-, the CPA rushed to get its new regional offices op- erating in 71 key cities to admin- ister and police the far-reccliing construction controls announced yesterday. In another rapid follow-up, the agency was expected to grant "reconversion priorities" today to help manufacturers of scarce building materials obtain needed machinery and equipment. This action would permit mak- ers of all 13 of the critically scarce materials and supplies to expand their operations and thus speed up hemo building. Critical Materials Named ___ The materials to be affected a encv justice department official said, are lumber kcPl t'11-1 stlltl-' department fully bricks, radii tors, bathtubs, tile' on the-developments but would not further discuss the ar- rest of Redin, a member of the Soviet purchasing commission at Seattle. Spy Mystery Bobs Up As FBI Seizes Red Navy Officer Lt. Redin Arrested as He Prepared to Flee by Ship From Portland, Ore.; Officer Refuses to Talk, U. S. Government And Russian Embassy Officials in Washington Silent WASHINGTON, March puzzHng but spine-tingling spy mystery confronted A-Lomb conscious Americans today as FBI agents snared a young Russian naval officer preparing to flee by ship from Portland, Ore. On the record, Lt. Nicolai Gregorovich Redin, 29-year- old member of the Soviet purchasing commission at Seattle, was arrested last night on espionage charges involving plans and information regarding the U. S. S. Yellowstone, a de- stroyer tender assigned to take part in the scheduled atomic Department Was in On It FBI Kept State Department Fully Informed About Ac- tivities Before Rcdin Seizure WASHINGTON, Mar. state department was kept fully informed about FBI activi- ties which led to seizure of n young Russian naval officer on charges of espionage, acting Sec- retary of State Dean Acheson said today. He declined further com- ment. The 20-year-old Soviet officer, Lt. Nicolai Gregorovich Rodin, was arrested last night in Port- land, Ore., just as he was about to board a Russian vessel which was preparing to sail home. Rcdin was accused of trying to obtain information involving the U.S.S. Yellowstone, a destroyer tender slated to participate in Pa- cific atom bomb tests. Acheson told a news confer- recently began taking his Last week their son. Lee Roy a m.f constitutionals" along vir- "Hutch" tripped in the tually deserted streets. They had !-j cut without hats or coats to c.-.trh   the ?f honorary interiors cool. band sorority. said, however, that considerably more had been relieved but were unable to give the total number immediately. The navy said the greatest number of flag officers during the war was 49G. The present total army strength both men and officers, is about compared with a war- time peak of The navy strength now stands at approxi- mately as against a war- time peak of the situation is on a Very sound basis." K. C. Wu, minister of informa- tion, said the Russians had agreed to give up Pu-Yo after protracted negotiations. It gen- erally is assumed that the former Japanese puppet will be tried as a war criminal." "We Have Plans" For IHm u. noncommittal, I a u K h e d and said only "we have plans for him. The Russians captured Pu- i i after they entered Manchuria. Lm said China has accepted Russia's offer to withdraw her troops from Manchuria by the end of April, but the foreign of- fice is not yet able to state the extent at which the process is under way. The Russians have notified China of withdrawal only from Mukden and Fuslntn. He said his government had not been advised of the dates the Soviets intended to quit any Holds To Dalren Rights Asked whether the Chinese were seeking to land troops at an open port in the Sino-Soviet treaty of last said China never has given up her stand that Chi- nese forces have the right to land said China had not received any Soviet assurances that in- dustrial equipment removed from Manchuria would be paid for. He replied "no statement" when asked if China had protest- ed such removals. .1 U. .Jva'V officially that the Sino-American military committee had directed execu- tive headquarters in Peiping to send truce teams into Manchuria to halt fighting between govern- ment and Communist troops The order instructed the teams to stay clear of Russian-occupied m line with the general price trend. Righ'. now, he asserted, building costs are shooting up fat- faster than other prices. The Chamber of Commerce said it is opposed to the use of subsidies "as a price control de- Mrs. Dooley Said To Have Loaned Idabel Bank Keys MUSKOGEE, Okla., March 27. to have loaned a friend keys to the Idabel State bank where she worked as a teller. Mrs. Elizabeth Dooley. 30, remained in jail today unable to make S5.000 bond after being charged with conspiracy. D. A. Bryce, FBI agent in charge, said Mrs. Dqoley's arrest climaxed a careful sifting of evi- dence by FBI agents after the Feb. 13 burglary. The robbers, after unlocking the front door. locking the vault, then doors behind them. areas. MRS. TRUMAN RETURNING INDEPENDENCE. Mo., March Bess Truman, wife of the president, left today by train for Washington after visits with relatives here and in Den- ver, Colo. She was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. David W. Wallace. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads Romance Began In Budapest, Hungary Culminates in Marriage Of Bill Key, Jr., In U. S. WASHINGTON, March romance which began in Budapest culminated in the mar- riage here of Miss Camilla Hiller. a stenographer in the Hungarian legation, to Lieut. William S. Key, Jr., of Oklahoma City. The ceremony was performed Monday by Judge Nathan R. Margold of the muicipal court. Among those attending were Hungarian Minister A 1 a d a r Szegcdy-Maszak and his wife- Counselor of the Legation Victor Csomoky and Mrs. Csoinoky and Ivan G. Nagy. secretary of the legation. Legation attaches said that Miss Hiller, native of Budapest met Lieutenant Key. son of Maj- or General William S. Key, head of the American army commis- sion in Hungary, while he was on duty with the commission in that country. Miss Hiller came to Washing- ton last January tn work in the legation offices. Lieutenant Key is returning to Budapest soon and Mrs. Key will join him there later After a wedding ceremony, the Hungarian minister and his wife gave a luncheon in honor of the couple a', the Wardman Park hotel. The couple went to New York for their honeymoon. CRUISER QUARANTINED HONGKONG. March 27.- The U. S. Cruiser Los Angeles was quarantined in Hongkong harbor today after two cases of smallpox were diagnosed aboard. Rear Adm. C. Turner Joy, com- mander of the American South China was reported aboard.] Arrested At Bank Mrs. Dooley was arrested by U. S. Marshal Granville Norris and FBI agents at the bank ves- terday. Norris said she told him she loaned her keys to n friend who had duplicates' made. Four others were tinder arrest on charges growing out of the burglary. Tin- robbers took in cash and checks totaling 000. Bryce said a portion of both the cash and checks had been recov- ered. Some of the checks were fished from a creek near Fort Towson a few days after the burglary. The FBI agent said the warrant for Mrs. Dooley was made out for Mary Doe by the Muskogec grand jury recently and that her arrest was held up pending com- pletion of investigation. Arraigned Twice Mrs. Dooley was arraigned twice yesterday, first at Antlers where her bond was set at U. S. District Attorney C. A. Summers decided she should be arraigned in Muskogec since the original complaint was filed here. U. S. Commissioner Forrester Brewstcr set the second bond at Summers said the charge ac- cused Mrs. Dooley of conspiring with Jack Gibson Moss, one of the defendants, to assist in the burglary by providing a combin- ation and keys. Moss, arraigned yesterday be- fore Brewstcr, requested another day for pleading and preliminary bond was set at Others indicted in the case in- cluded John Thomas Duncan, Jo- seph Junior Larson, and Everett Junior Pact, all held in Fort Worth. The formal charge was disclos- ed late last night by Assistant FBI Agent Julius A. Bernard, at Portland, hours after FBI Chief J. Edgar Hoover had announced tersely in Washington that Redin had been seized as be was nbout to board a Russian canning vessel for home. Arraigned before U. S. Com- missioner Robert A. Leedy, the Soviet officer, wearing the uni- form of his rank, was asked whether he understood English. "I Will Not Talk- Thumping Lcedy's desk, Redin cried "I will not talk, I will not talk." He then demanded to see the Soviet consul, who was not rep- resented at the proceedings. But Leedy, fixing bail at ordered the officer to be held in Multnomah county jail in default of bond until another hearing is set. Under Watch Several Months Redin, a graduate of the Rus- sian naval academy who came to this country four years ago. had been under "intensive FBI scru- tiny" for several months, Hoover said in Washington. State department officials and the Russian embassy were silent. There was no immediate clear- cut answer to the No. I question posed by the nrrest: could atomic bomb secrets be involved? On Capitol Hill, Chairman Wood (D-Ga) of the house com- mittee on unnmerican activities abo declined after a committee sessirn to discuss Redin's arrest. He did announce, however, that a committee representative would :onfer with Canadian officials "with respect to any interlocking activities" between the alleged Russian espionage there and re- ported attempts to obtain Amer- ican atomic bomb secrets. Hearings Start Soon Wood also disclosed that the committee will conduct hearings within two weeks in its investi- gation of reports that spies have been at work in this country. Committee Counsel Ernie Adam- son, who said the group had a "pretty fair knowledge" of the Redin case, told reporters one of the hearings probably would ba held in Seattle. Asked whether the committee had been in touch with F3I Di- rector J. Edgar Hoover on the case. Wood replied: "This committee has had con- tact with the FBI." The formal charge against Red- in was disclosed last night at Portland by Assistant FBI Ap.ent Ji-.li-j3 A. Bernard, after H'ovcr announced tersely in Washington, that the Soviet officer had been taken into custody. Warrant I.isurd Friday Bernard said the charge accus- ed Redin of action "against tho peace ami dignity of the United States of America." He said the accusations wero made in Seattle on Dec. 22. 1945. the day Redin is charged with having obtained the information. The warrant was issued last Fri- day. There was no announcement of how tho young Russian officer had obtained the plans or whom the officer had "induced" to ob- tain the information. D.tails of the arrest were slow developing. The FIJI nt first clamped a lid both here and at Portland after the first brief an- nouncement at p.m. (EST) last night. It disclosed, however, that the ship Redin was preparing to (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Would Keep Kin At Home TIENTSIN, March IVTaj. Gen. Keller E. Rockey, com- mander of the Marine Third am- phibious corps, told a press con- ference today he is opposed to the marines bringing wives or families to North China "because of the temporary nature of their assignment here, the indefinite length of their stay and a short- age of housing and shipping." Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads THf PESSIMIST Bf Dob Jr. We don't believe th' ladies will ever ag'in go in fer those long skirts that used hang like a wet flag on a still day. Nearly all th' about th' "justice" o' our courts is done by th1 inex- perienced.   

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