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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 26, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 26, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             L.na6n- AP, -The U. S. An., C.mmanJ tojoy 4.000 G. BHde. wK. join Kujbana, in 0. S. decHned ,.ilins Clearing tonight: cooler cast por- tion; Wednesday fair and Warmer. 42nd 232 THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS City Offered Big All-Metal Hangar by WAC, Decision To Be Reached Here This Week ADA, OKLAHOMA. TUESDAY, MARCH 1946 UNO Security Council in Session FIVE CENTS THE COPY Hawkins Is Ordered Held For Trial Decision of Justice Bour- land in Hotly Debated Case Given Tuesday Afternoon Harvey Hawkins, member of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol who is rhargrd with rr.rnt. war. hound nvrr to district court Tuesday nftenooii after a preliminary h  who said that Hawkins sold him a Western Field .22 automatic gun and identified it. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2 Kerr More Hopeful fo Gel Use Of Glennan Hospital WASHINGTON, Mar. 20 brightened today, in the opinion of Gov. Robert S Kerr of Oklahoma, for transfer o the army's Glennon General hos pital at Okmulgee, Okla., to the state as a branch of Oklahoma A. and M. college. c Iicurr> accompanied bj Senator Thomas (D-Okla) and Rep. Stigler conferred with war assets corporation offi- cials about use of the establish- ment as a veteran's educational division of the college "I believe we are doing pretty well with our the gov- ernor told a reporter after the c inference. He said the state virtually had abandoned plans to have the v e t c r a n s' administration take over the surplus institution for a VA hospital. The VA previously lird said it would be unable to use the hospital because of a lack of doctors. But the state's application to (Continued on Pace 2 Column 3) iWEATHER i-__________.- Oklahoma Clearing tonight; cooler east portion: low temper- ature under 30 panhandle to mid- c.e 40s elsewhere; Wednesday and warmer. acquire facilities of the Oklahoma Ordnance Works. Pryor. Okla is not progressing too satisfactor- ily, the governor said. "We have a lot of competition from others who are bidding on various parts of the project he explained. Discussing Glennon hospital. Kerr said if present plans work the government will lease The hangar, city officials have been notified, is one of 40 origin- ally made for shipment overseas, is brand new and is even crated and ready for shipment. All-Metal Hangar It is 100 feet long and 130 feet wide, all-metal and with all steel work included, ready to be put together at the site. It is now at Granite City, III. Thc hangar cost the govern- ment and is offered -to Ada at Local men concerned about Ada s future in aviation immedi- ately got busy considering the of- fer, and in their discussions have been unanimous in regarding it as a one thing, the price is only a part of the original t >st: for another, steel isn't even available now for new construe tion and when it becomes avail- able the costs will be even higher. C of C Meeting Topic The offer will be outlined in more detail at the Thursday noon meeting of thc Ada Chamber of Commerce, which i: being desig- nated an 'open meeting' so that a11 who arc interested can attend. There will be taken up the matter of whether Ada is going ihcad and accept the offer and if so how the money is to be pro- vided for prompt city at present having no fund avail- able for the purpose. Prompt Action Sought As considered briefly since word was received Monday af- ternoon, thc hangar xvould be city to pay the cost of away, and the city would arrange for a con- crete floor and for setting up of the big building, with other de- tails involved to be worked out as they come up. At present the big airport is without hangar facilities. With the new all-steel hangar tho city would have a big start t Avard making thc airport usabb for private and commercial fly- ing, city officials point out. AFL Joins in Plea For Price Controls President Green Says Chooi Would Follow Too Early Abandonment Big Three Divided On UNO Inquiry Into Iranian Situation Russia Trying to Block Council Inquiry, Britain and U. S. Leading Fight to Take Up Iran's Appeal for Hearing; Gromyko Says Ruts-Iranian Settlement Leaves No By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER NEW YORK, March Big Three split sharply in the United Nations Security Council today, with Russia trying to block a c o u n c 11 inquiry into the Iranian situation and in early afternoon the peace-enforcement ag- ency recessed without reaching a vote. Secretary of State Byrnes, who Sweeping Order Will Channel Building Material Into Homes Ribbenfrop Denies All Counts In War Crimes Trial By RICHARD KASISCIIKE NUERNBERG, March Von Ribbcntrop told the international military tibunal today he accepted full responsi- bility for his acts as foreign min- ister of Germany, but was plead- ing innocent on all counts of the war.crimes indictment. WASHINGTON. March 26. American Federation o" ibor joined with houscwifi today in asking con ress to continue price and rcn ontrols. Following spokesman for i core of women's organizations FL President William Green followed the example of Her- mann Gocring and Rudolf Hess in opening his personal defense. _ The court ruled out evidence intended to prove that the Ver- sailles treaty was unjust and was signed by Germany "under dur- ess." Sir David Maxwell Fyfe, British prosecutor, said the de- fense claim was "completely re- mote, irrelevant and beyond the terms of the tibunal's charter." Defense attorneys had launch- ed a five-point attack upon the treaty und the prosecution's charge that the nazis conspired to break the treaty with the aim of waging aggressive war. With prosecutors interjecting frequent counter arguments counsel for Joachim Von Ribben- trop and Hjalmar Schacht sup- ported Seidl. The defense made these allegations: Forbids Start of New Com- mercial, Industrial Con- struction Unless It Is Authorized By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITII WASHINGTON. March 28, government, acting to spe- ed construction of homes for veterans, today clamped drastic restrictions on building or repair of virtuallv all other structures. The civilian production admin- stration issued a far-reaching order, effective at once, forbidd- ng the start of any new commer- or industrial construction un- less specifically authorized. This applies to such things as stores, office buildings, road- houses, theaters and factories Throughout Entire Nation The objective is to make more scarce building materials avail- able for the new homes Russians Opposed, UNRRA Approves Stand on Armies By ALEX SINGLETON ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Mar., 28, Russian opposition, the United States won UNRRA's approval today of a mandate to prevent occupying armies from living off the land they have con- quered. The action came after United the government is aiming at dur- States Delegate C. Tyler Wood bluntly and openly protested that a Ukranian-Russian move to sido- track the argument because it political implications would be "the course of cowardice." Russian Delegate Nikola Fco- while arguing that the issue Russians Are Leaving Karaj Pulling Out of Ancient Iranian Caravan Stop With Little Fanfare By JOSEPH C. GOODWIN KARAJ, Iran, March 25. M') Russians are pulling out of this ancient caravan-stop northern gateway to the Iranian capital of Tehran with as little fanfare as when they cntercr it almost five years ago. Last night, even before the So- viet government announced that the evacuation of Red army troops had begun, the garrison began loading trucks and moving tanks. By midnight. 14 tanks American built Shermans and Russian were thund- ering through the village streets toward Kazvin and the north. Karaj is 20 miles northwest of i ___ led the fight for having the coun- cil go into the case on Iran's ap- peal against the presence of Red army troqpi in that country, served notice that he wanted to make a second speech this after- noon. At least two other speeches were in prospect. The immediate issue was whe- ther the council would accept Iran's appeal for a hearing and BYRNES DEMANDS ACTION NEW YORK, March 26. (-T) of State Byrnes demanded today that the United Nations security coun- cil vote Immediately on whether It would go Into Iran's complaints against Russia. Preliminary state- ments indicated a favorable vote over Soviet protests. inir the next two years. The measure, announced bv iut m, national housing Expediter oxcluslon from thc Agenda, did son W. Wyatt and CPA trator John D. Small, applies throughout the United States and in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. It probably will be ex- tended later to Alaska and Hawaii. It permits completion of any institution to the state out, the part of A. and "for "several years to see how the idea will work. Kerr also discussed with Speaker Raj-burn (D-Tex) plans for early house action on a bill In give soil conservation districts SOUK; of the surplus heavy war machinery. The governor left today for Oklahoma. Extended Weather Forecast Showers m light amount b-asl a. western Kansas; western Oitlahoma ediicsday; a a i n rear 70: vhowi-rs in moderate amount ..lissoun. eastern Kan- sas and eastern Oklahoma Thurs- cay or Jriday; cooler Nebraska- warmer Kansas. Oklahoma and ..Iissouri Wednesday: generally coo er Thursday and Fridav; gen- rrally warmer Saturday and Sun- day; temperatures averaging near rmal Oklahoma; 3-8 degrees v "orrral MJisouri, Kansas Nebraska. i Four Days Remain On Red Cross Fund Contributions to Toward Goal The contributions to the 19-48 Red Cross Fund Campaign pulled ip to S13.37G 2G today, but time s running out on the drive as nly d; ys remain to reach he quota of S15.GGO. Officials of the Pontotoc Coun- Chapter of the American Red Cross urged that every worker hurry to complete last-minute canvassing, and county districts outside Ada are urged to report at the earliest possible day be- fore the drive closes. Allen. .Stonewall, and Roff have not completed their drives but are expected to be complete the; week. MIAMI, March new business buildings costing approximately are being erected in the downtown area. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads ild the house banking commit- '0 that the "premature abandon- ent of price controls would in- vitably bring chaos. He madc'it plain, however, that was not in sympathy with thc (ministration's entire economic asserting: "The policy as a whole is made p of patchwork and conflicting decisions." Green said "profiteers" are try- ing to destroy price controls and added: "The people are frightened at the prospect of the feverish runa- way price boom which is already close upon them." Representatives of 20 organiza- tions, claiming membership of over 10.JOO.OOO women, submitted their rebuttal lo businessmen who have told the house banking committee that industry would Produce more and everyone would be better off without OPA Caroline F. Ware, speaking for the women's groups, told t h e committee in a statement tlfat it is imperative that "congress act promptly and decisively to dem- onstrate its determination to tect the people from disaster." construction already begun, pro- vided "any of the materials which are to be an integral part of thc structure have been incorporated signed the m thc sito" today, Versailles treaty "under duress S is bemB carricd on the. treaty was made obsolete by the British-German naval agreement of 1035. the treaty was not in accord with President Wilson's 14 points. failure of other signa- tory powers to fulfill thc treaty- abrogated it. the German abroga- tion was "in accord with views widely held even in some victor t na countries. Chanufe Woman Is Found Shot Dead Body Located in Tourist Cabin of That City CHANUTE, Kas.. March 26. f.TJ Lccta Woodward, about 5. mother of a laughter, was ealh in n tourist cabin last night, Chief of Police Ralph Rhodes re- 'orted today. The police chief ro- cconomic Arkansas Governor To Speak at Tulsa TULSA, March 28, i" iuuay, Ben T. Laney of Arkansas will I ft0 chief said, the man speak at a banquet of the Tulsa im was acci- club April 12. L. Harold Wright and lhat tho two had been manager of the oil activities dc- _i Ivlrs. woman's body, clad in a pink rayon slip, was discovered in a bed at thc cabin after a man had telephoned police and incoherent- ly told officers he "had shot a xvoman." present. What's Not Included Tin- order does not apply to construction, repair, alternation or installation jobs on which the cost does not exceed these allow- ances: 1. Houses designed for five or fewer families, also farmhouses or other structures, such as a garage, on residential property__ a job. 2. Hotel, resort, apartment house or other residential build- ing designed for occupancy by more than five a job. Commercial or service estab- lishment, such as office, store garage, theater, warehouse, radio station, gas sen-ice 000 a job. 4. Farm buildings excluding a job. I 5. Church, hospital, school, pub- lic building, charitable institution a job. 6. Factory, plant or other in- ustrial structure used for mnnti- acturing, processing or assembl- ng; logging and lumber camp- ipier structure for a commercial said the airport or carrier terminal- rail- way or street car building: re- was outside UNRRA's authority [and arguing vigorously for its I exclusion from the Agenda, d not vote. Neither did France. The resolution, originally pro- posed by the United States, call- ed upon UNRRA's 48 member nations to direct their forces to refrain from: 1. Consuming locally-produced than fresh fruits and vegetables of a perish- able nature which are in tem- porary local or other supplies" which are normal- ly included in an UNRRA pro- gram. 2. Using land or other local re- sources which could bo utilized for the production of supplies to meet relief needs of the local population. The tanks were followed by a column of canvas-covered trucks, estimated by national police to be transporting men. In Tehran the Iranian director of propaganda said "the Russians moved out 25 tanks, 100 trucks and 700 men last night, and the movement is continuing today. At a rambling camp southeast of the town today most of the buildings were deserted. Crews of red-starred- soldiers were com- pleting the work of abandon- ment. Two weeks ago the movement of troops and tanks into the town caused great concern in Tehran and many wealthy residents moved out. crown son and found shot to Already Settled, Stalin Tells UP Of Troops in Iran By EDDY GILMORE MOSCOW, March 2C. Red army troops continued to withdraw from Iran today ac- cording to an agreement with Premier Qavnin, and Prime Min- ister Stalin asserted that the Impeding in any way the "eq- question of Soviet .troops in that uitnble distribution of imported boon and indigenous relief supplies, or the effective use of land or local production put the casi on the agenda or reject it. At recess the British- American position apparently lacked only one vote of the nec- essary majority of seven. Poland Stands With Russia Soviet Ambassador Andrei Gromyko said in a statement to the council today that Russia and Iran had made an agreement for the withdrawal of Red forces from Iran and that this was Rus- sia's report to the council on the situation. Byrnes and Sir Alex- ander Cadogan of Britain wanted the agreement itself filed with the council. Poland stood with Russia. Cadogan and Byrnes insisted that both Russia and Iran should report on their agreement on the removal of Russian troops which Prime Minister Stalin officially disclcsed to the world-last night Gromyko Questions Byrnes Point Gromyko said Byrnes' position seemed to be in contradiction to the charter which says that sit- uations only endangering peace RUSSIA LOSES NEW YORK. March United Nations security council defeated today a Soviet move to block Iran's appeal to the council. By a vote of 8 to 2, the council refused to take the Iranian case off its agenda. resources for thu production of such supplies." The council deferred tempor- arily action on the final part of the resolution which would in effect, empower the director gen- eral to penalize any violators of the agreement through a down- ward readjustment of UNRRA aid to their countries. partmcnt of the chamber of com- merce announced today. '.'The Wright said, "is Jcing sponsored by the Tulsa chamber and local oil men as a part of the interstate oil r-om- act commission's spring quartelv neeting here April 11-13" -iney's subject will be "Indus- trial Development in Arkansas." Gov. Robert S. Kerr of Oklaho- ma, compact chairman, and Gov Andrew F. Schoeppel of Kansas, former chairman of the compact, also have accepted invitations to the banquet, Wright added. call wi to a cabin in the north part of town, occupied for the last 10 years by Frank B. Hall, 58 a yardmaster for the Santa Fe here. Mrs. Woodward had been shot under the right breast by a .410 shotgun, Rhodes reported. The police chief quoted Hall as saying last night, "you'll nev- er know the reason." Today however, the chief said, the man told him the shooting was acci- scarch laboratory: pilot plant; motion picture set; utility struc- ture, including telephone and telegraph; gas or petroleum re-I fining or distribution, except ser- vice stations and 000 a job. Wages-? 7. Other a job. fcv-cn Vet Homes New Court Test Of Contingency Fund This Time It's Volidity Of' Sum to Finance State Ag- ency on Vet Education OKLAHOMA CITY, March 20. state supreme court will rule on the validity of a allocation from the governor's contingency fund to finance work of the state certifying agency which overseas veterans educa- tional matters. The court assumed original jur- isdiction in thc case, latest of single of work may bo sub- Mrs. Woodward's husband, G J. Woodward, is a Santa Fe brake- man now stationed at Moline, Kas. Hall's wife recently filed suit for divorce. Rhodes said ad- ding that the Halls also are the rents of a son and a daughter. Rhodes said Hall told him he and Mrs. Woodward had c o n s u m ctl four or five bottles of beer and a half bottle of rum. Hall was held in Jail for invcs- IRation. No charges have been filed against him. Read the Ada News Want Ads. divided for the purpose of com- ing within the cost allowances. However, a CPA official explain- ed, there is no limit on the lum- por of separate jobs which may be undertaken while thc order is in effect. Technically the order requires formal authorization before even homes for veterans can be built The national administra- tion expects to give these homes the green .light, however, under its emergency housing program for veterans. In other homrs built to sell to veterans at or less or to rent at a month or less Will continue to be eligible for priority help in obtaining scarce materials. Other, more expen- sive, homrs will be authorized only when construction will not (Continued on Page 2 Column 6) series of suits testing of the governor to appropriate for emergencies. Kerr contended an emergency existed since the agency was operating without funds and could not properly sup- ervise its program. Rejecting claims against the al- location, the state auditor con- tended the need did not consti- tute an emergency as defined in an earlier decision limiting thc governor's powers to appropriate m contingencies. The suit specifically asks a writ of mandamus to require the audi- tor and the state treasurer to ap- prove a salary claim filed by Paul Cope, soldiers' relief com- mission employee who works on the educational program. WASHINGTON. March 20. f.T) L. Lewis today notified bituminous coal operators he will end their present contract this Sunday at midnight and miners will "stay home with their families" next week. country, has been settled. Izyestin published a reply from Stalin to a telegram sent by Hugh Baillie. president of the United Press in which Baillie re- quested comment on a Winston Churchill interview and the in- ternational situation. Thanking Baillie for his tele- gram Stalin said Churchill's ar- gument cannot be regarded as "convinving" and added that thc question of withdrawing troops i from Iran has been settled. The former British prime minister had called for rapid action by the security council of the United Nations on Iran. A Tass dispatch from Teheran said the Tehran radio had de- clared in connection with the Red army withdrawal that "national circles receive this cheerful news as a big success for the policy of his excellency, Qavam. They hope that under his wise leader- ship as respected head of the government, thc Iranian people will attain their national de- sires." Another Tass dispatch from Tehran said the Tehran radio took notice of a broadcast by the Ankara radio on a report that internal disorders had taken place in Iran. "Such a report from the radio of a friendly state was unexpect- ed and contradicts the principles nf Tass quoted the as replying, "va- which discussed and security should come before the council. "The conditions necessary for the inclusion of the subject on the agenda have not been satis- fied, Gromyko said. It was his second speech to the council, his first having been a request for rejection of the Iranian appeal for council help. His implication seemed to be that the Iranian situation docs not endanger peace and securitv for he declared that because 6l withdrawal of Red army troops, underway since last Sunday, the situation is no longer the same as it was when Iran appealed to thc council 10 days ago. Sir Alexander endorsed the Byrnes declaration. He cited a resolution adopted in London by the council two months ago say- ing that Iran and Russia should try to settle their troubles direct- ly but that the council might ark them to report what they were doing. "Then there is the other ques- maintenance of Soviet troops in Iran" beyond the March 2 deadline for their withdrawal. Cadogan said. of friendship, Tehran radio rious circles these falsifications could not un- derstand thc reason for the un- friendly behavior which does not correspond to the facts." OKMULGEE. March Okmulgee's new peanut shelling plant is expected to be in opera- tion by August It will have a ca- pacity of 50 tons of peanuts daily Eventually it may make peanut butter. Indians of British Columbia have no butter worries; they make it from thc oil of a fish, the oolichan. THr PESSIMIST 87 nob Dlinki, LAWTON, March 2C. _ Millard Carter. Lawton high student, has been awarded first place in the Junior Cham- ber of Commerce's save-a-life campaign for the week ending March 1G. The of the winning es- say was "Lives Can Be Saved On Public Highways by Courtesv Caution and Common sense'." Mor'. than students are par- ticipating ijs the essay writing contest which will continue 12 weeks. Local winners will be sent to the state contest. All hickory trees are natives of America, and the name comes from their Indian name "Powco- n hicora.' A lot o parents seem t' RO on th fday an' let th Scout Masters take care o' th' children. You'd hardly know Newt car since he's re- painted th' fenders an' changed th' engine number.   

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