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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 25, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 25, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             of the UN ju.t about .urn, wh.l. propo.ition-it I. mod, up ,f NoH.n, and will ond ,.n. only 0, Ion9 they huly a bit b.yOBa .ha, Partly cloudy west: scattered showers east this afternoon and tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Preliminary On Hawkins Is Started Many Present When Charges Against Patrolman Brought Up in Justice Court Preliminary hearing be can Monday mnrr.int: in justice court of K.-an'K in the case of Harvey kins, state highway patrolman of cmbezzle- Th" was moved to the district courtroom when the crowd of spectators began as- the courtroom accom- modations were packed as the hearing pr.t under way and con- until noon, when the state had completed its testimony and recess rrdcred for lunch. Hawkins is accured of taking a Run from Roberts' car and of later tradim: it to Jimmy Mac- fas while t.i rifle was in liis care as 'bailee a.-d trustee.' r e questioned closely during the morning. Ill early afternoon, when the hearing was resumed, the de- fens" becan presentini: witnesses. M.ni.-te.-s, business and profes- men. from down- trr.vn office-: and businesses were Present m numbers, havmi; stirred leveral reports that had r.-.ne out aliout the ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, MARCH 25, IfMG A, stimulating attendance was the riitnim; by many taxpay- ers IP. the past week of a petition a.'.kini; n r.i.md jury investi- gation of conditions m' Pontotoc county. Yamashifa Advises Conquerors On Milifary Strategy x _ WASHINGTON. March General Tomoyuki iamarhita advised the na.'on that hanged him as a war crim- inal to igii'iu- tr.iditiotal ideas of strategv in preparing acain.t the of anottier conflict. In :.n nrtirle dictated from his ..lanil.i fii-atit rell anrl published today m the vmi-official infan- try journal Vamashila told his conqueiurs that the atomic bomb lom: range planes mean that, the text-books of West Point and j here Annapolis must lie rewritten. Mr. Baruch Puts Emphasis On Production His 13 Recommendations Include Repair of Inflation- ary Damages Already Done WASHINGTON, March M. Baruch called today for a "high court of com- merce" to repair the inflationary damage he said has been done by hiking wages and prices while cutting taxes. Cautioning that "the race of selfishness is the elder statesman o' two world wars pleaded for another year of price control coupled with a firm grip on wages. But he said there must be one overriding objective greater production. New Policy In testimony prepared for the house committee, the 75- year-old Baruch lashed out at the government's new wage-price policy pegged to the recent cent an hour steel workers' pay boost. "This will be followed by in- creases all along the he told the committee considering an administration request to keep OPA alive a year beyond its present June 30 expiration date. "Call it a bulge but it is really a a grave one. This was inflationary." Has 12-Pnlnt Program Hiirucli laid down a 13-point program rapped by his emphasis on the necessity for greater in- dustrial output. Without increas- ed production "the rest of my suggestions are the witness declared as he listed these other recommendations: 1. Stop increasing the money supply. 2. Stop decreasing taxes until the budget is balanced. "There may be wisdom in reinstating the tax reduction." "Slop bunking the public by FIVE CENTS THE COPK New U. S. Ambassador to Russia Lt. Gener.nl W. Bedell Smith, left, is sworn in as the new Ambassador to Russia bv Stanley Woodward, chief of the State Department's Division of Protocol. General Smith will remain in Washington until time for his departure for Tclcphoto) Murray Backs UAW Thomas saying wa.': increases can be (Continued on Pago ,'t Column 1) W.H. Summers, Long County Resident, Dies at Age of 82 W. II. Summers. resident of Pontotoc county since died Monday at a.m. at a local hospital aftcv a brief illness. I-'uneral .services will be held Tuesday at 2 p.m. from the Cris- well Kunera! Chapel, with burial Thy ill-fated "Tiger of i Murphyrcesboro, Term., srcdic'.c'i that nny further major i IDO-J, and lived there i v.-ir settled by a single air. argued there- fore that the infantry has lost its or.re vital role. Summers was born near Jan. 29, until his marriage in 1887 to Miss Dona Hurkett of thu same community. The> moved in 18fi8 to New Boston. Tex.. The strategy of seeking to des- for eight years, then c t oy the enemy's will to fight by j Territory to what is KnocKinc out such means of and to Pontotoi where he farmed on to Indian is now Bok- ntotoc county in ports During his residence here mains, iarr.ashita noted, but add-I he served several terms as coun- l-: ty weigher. "Now we are about to Thirteen children were born we sc-e.-n, in f.ict. alreadv to have to him and Mrs. Summers, rtage where we don't Surviving are the widow; five really need the ground forces at daughters, Mrs. Erbie Lollar of centers simultaneously and a: a blow, x x x "The v.-ar will be over, to all :nter.ts r.r.tl purposes, even if iT.err.y forces are still m exist- rtill unengaged and .still un- defeated." From this he deducted as a Ceneral principle that "in the fu- tr.at country which possess- es the largest terrain in an area and -ttains the highe.st technical progress x x x will be in a highly cnvjable portion. In fact it will be unbeatable." Youngsters There Early for Meeting YOHK. 23. America, represented by predominated rainy morning m the line Hunter college of Ada. Claude Summers of Nor- man, Ray Summers of Sundown, Tex., Rov Summers of Ft. Worth, and Jack Summers of Los An- geles. There are also a sister, Mrs. Monroe Reeves of Durant; two brothers, Lum and Charley Sum- mers of Ventura, Calif.; 40 grandchildren and 15 great- grandchildren. Military Training Bill Is Deferred WASHINGTON, Mar. house military committee plans to hold the controversial f.niveisa! military training bill over until next January and let the new congress wrestle with it. Committee members said pri- vately that a general, informal agreement had been reached to take no action until next year. Assails AFL, Industry Leaders for Failure, Forcing Strikes Upon CIO Ily MAX HAM, ATLANTIC CITY. N. J., March President Philip Murray ended a speech at the CIO United Auto Workers Con- vention today by praising H. J. Thomas, incumbent who is bat- tling Walter Reuthcr for the UAW presidency. After a bare mention of Reu- ther's name along with other of- ficers to whom he expressed ap- preciation, Murray referred to Thomas as: "This big guy for whom I have a distinct fondness the president of the United Auto Workers union." He specifically denied in his speech that he was here to take part in the bitter UAW political campaign, but the long cheer that went up at his tribute to Thomas showed that the Thomas forces considered it an endorsement. ninmc.i A. F. L., Industry Murray, in two-fisted style, blamed the recent wave of strikes on the failure of AFL and industry leaders to "fulfill their obligations" nt the labor-manage- nent conference last fall. He said :he CIO didn't want to strike but it was "thrust upon us." He declared: "It may be there are some of our enemies who would like to divide and conquer. They would like to see the CIO torn asunder, destroyed, and the workers drop- ped bnck to the pitiful days. "But I say there isn't anyone or any group big enough to do a single solitary damn thing to the CIO. We are mor.e influential and Russian Keeps from Records Hess Attempt to Get Excerpts Read of Reported Agreements Secret Treaty Claimed Be- tween Germany, Russia Be- fore Nazi's Invaded Poland ny NOLANI) NOUOAAItn NUKKNIlKKCi. Germany. Mar. objection the K IK: sia n prosecutor prevented counsel for Rudolf Hess from reading into the court record to- day excerpts from what he call- ed a secret tn Germany and before the nazi attack on oan., The lawyer asserted before the nt thu corncr of international military tribunal I-nt" that the alleged treaty fixed Morgan Carter In Hospital After Being Hit by Car V-UV SuVk-d'bv struck three d-ivs hilc b-v William K. Lamb, I St nn of Allen about 9 o'clock Mon- 11 Truman Pledges To UN Our Cooperation spheres of influence in eastern Kurope and that details were con- tained in an a'ffadavit submitted by Dr. Friedrieh Cans, former German ambassador to Moscow. Soviet Prosecutor K. A. Kuden ko jumped up to object to the reading of "suprise documents" before they translated and submitted to the prosecution. Sounds Like "Hearsay" "I don't kmnv what kind of Police reported that Carter was (Continued on Pago 2 Column 5} Ten Best Dressed Men Are Designated But Where Were They Able to Get All That Well Dressed Man's Wardrobe NEW YORK. March 25. The custom tailors guild of America today presented its lominations for the nation's in >cst dressed ineiden- ally listed what a well dressed nan's wardrobe really should in- documents he is talking Rudcnko said. "It sounds like hearsay to me." When Chief Justice Sir Geof- frey Lawrence sustained the ob- jection, Hess1 lawyer countered with: "In that case I must ask per- mission to call Soviet Foreign Commissar Molotov to establish if this agreement was not actual- ly concluded." One provision of the alleged secret agreement, the attorney said, was that Germany "declar- ed itself uninterested in three Baltic Lithuania and Finland." Galleries Amused The tribunal ignored that re- quest and the galleries, tittered. Earlier, a document introduced by Hess' counsel claimed that the former deputy fuehrer had warn- ed the British government, a month after he parachuted into Scotland, that the nazis planned to establish concentration camps and to starve the British popula- tion if an attempt were made to continue the war after an inva- sion of the British Isles. This threat was contained walking in the street with the traffic when Lamb approached the scene of the accident driving a Model A Ford. Carter was knocked down and run over before Lamb brought his car to a stop. Carter is in Val- ley View hospital suffering from a possible? fracture; of his right shoulder and .several fractured ribs. The accident occurred at the corner of Tenth and Rennic about 50 feet south on Rennie. It was investigated by Capt. Luther Davis and G. W. Vandivcr of the city police force. Truman Puts Stress on UN Winont to UNO Council, Horriman to Britain Indi- cate Importance Of Organization WASHINGTON. March 25, t.P> Truman carried out a two-way diplomatic shift today which placed new stress on the 'mportance this country attaches o the United Nations organiza- ion. The chief executive designat- ed John G. Winant to be Amcri- representative on the UNO ''conomic and social council and V. Avcrell Harriman to succeed Vinant as ambassador to Britain. Meanwhjle, Lt. Gen. Walter Jedrll Smith headed for Moscow >y plane to fill the post Harri- nan varafed several weeks ago vhen he resigned as ambassador o Hussia. Government officials and dip- cited Winant's long-rum- 'fed appointment as evidence hat the United States has hopes or the economic mid social coun- il as great as those for the better dvertised UNO general nsscmb- V and the all-powerful security uuncil. These officials recalled Win- ill's fight for social legislation s a threu-time republican gover- of New Hampshire: his work s head of the first federal social I security board under President (Roosevelt, and his terms as as- sistant director and director of the international labor office. The economic and social coun- will seek such goals as rising worldwide living stan- dards and high employment scheduled to hold its first meeting in New York in May. Sec. Byrnes Soys from Now on No Nation Must Be Allowed to Become Aggressor; UN Security Council Formally Launched By JOHN M. IIIGHTOWER NEW YORK, March Truman pledged to the United Nations Security Council today "America's wholehearted co-operation" in the cause of peace, and Secretary of State Byrnes warned that from now on no nation must be allowed "to take the law into its own hands." In a brief speech prepared the council's first session at its temporary American headquar- ters at Hunter Bronx, Byrnes college in presented the the president's I CO-word message of welcome and added on his own behalf this ndminition: "Nations like individuals should do their best to adjust their disputes without resort to litigation. But no nation has the right to take the law into its own hands. If disputes cannot be set- tled by friendly negotiations, they must be brought before the security council. Promptness Is Factor "That is why the security council must at all times be pre- pared to act promptly. That is Dead or Not, His Successor Named Much Mystery Yet About China's Secret Police Head CHUNGKING, March 25, Although the widely reported plane-crash death of Gen. Tai Li, head of China's secret police, has not been confirmed officially, the Kuomintang newspaper World Daily News said today that the government has selected L. Gen. Cheng Chieh-Min as his succes- sor. General Cheng, government commissioner at the Peiping exe- cutive headquarters and a mem- ber of the commission which ar- ranged the truce with Chinese formerly was direc- tor of the intelligence depart- clude. The sartorial ,vere: top notchers Edward R. Stcttinius, Jr.. chief J. S. delegate to UNO; Actor Ray Milland; Orchestra Leader Guy .ombardo; Morion Bernstein, president of the National Silver Co.: Crooner Perry Como; Alfred Gwvnrv Vandcrbilt; Base sports jackets (solid six persons Among in line. time; if the draft is extended, as first in line were indicated, for less than a year, Ralph Sherman. IB. and his bro- the committee wants to review Irvine Sherman. Ifi, who ar-j'he entire military picture just r.ved shortly_ after 1 a. m. I before expiration of the renewed 41. native of I draft net; it is election year, and summer v.-as the first adult in line, j constituents generally seem split jacket, blue one re'g'u- him a letter from over the issue. i------._.i ..S.i. UNO firknowledgmg receipt of a r o n C fir which he wrote the pairs of slacks (solid and six business suits (mostly solidsl; the minutes of a Hess interview board of milita'ry operations with Lord Simon June 10, 1941. lof the national military council. Only selected portions of the -17. he is a graduate of Mos- 'cow's Sun Yat-Sen univ< rsity. He flew from Peiping to Chung- king yesterday for a conference two topcoats (one camel's hair, just one two overcoats (one before expiration of the renewed brown or gray, one one tuxedo (gray dinner page transcript were read into the record. "Dissipated" Winnie's Qualms Swarthy Krnst Wilhelm Ilohle, Knglish-bor- and South African- reared leader of the- nazi "foreign grinned at Hess from the witness stand while the defense read Bottle's affadavit that ho "dissipated fears and qualms" of Winston Church- i in a personal interview nine years ago. Bohle swore that the German .b.issy arranged through the British foreign office for hint to spend more than an hour talking with Churchill at the hitter's London flat in October, 1937. The upshot w.ns, lie alleged, that Churchill abandoned plans for an inquiry by the house of commons i..to nazi activities in Kngland. The defense counsel said the b.-own uniformed Bohlc was Hess' only witness. More Battles Near Mukden Reported Communists, Government Troops Clash; Communists Make New Demands By HAROLD K. MILKS CHUNGKING. March 25, "Pitched battles" between central government and communist troops near Mukden were des- cribed here today as the govern- ment and communists were re- ported on the verge of agreeing !o send truce-inspection teams in- to Manchuria. Dispatches from Mukden said :hat four regiments of communist reinforcements under Gen. Lin Piao had hotly contested govern- ment entry into Gushun, impor- tant coal center 30 miles cast of Mukden. The communist forces now are withdrawing to the northeast under the pressure of govern- ment forces, which are continu- ing to advance, the report declar- ed. CALLED TO ORDER NEW YORK. Mar. <.T) Tal-Chi of China, president nf the United Na- tions security council, rapprd the council to order for flnt mrrtlni: In America at p. m.. EST. Dr. Quo, speaklnjr In Enr- IMi, said It was fitting the council should meet In this "land of freedom and liber- ty." He predicted the coun- cil would "Justify the faith which of the world have In It." His speech then was transa- lated into French. over the issue tuxcdo ,vfjth vest of same cloth in London Pf are." which he I :o th- London UNO meeting. I time." vire-iter lor amount in- News Classified Ads iWEATHERi OKLAHOMA Partlv cloudy A. and MY cojiegerto isi.t and in northwest thk after- mforma- temperatures to- Panhandle to 50-55 j't: partly cloudy, cool- ix'.rcrr.e catt. if we committee mem- pairs'o'f her said. Its just the wrong (shoes (six business, four sports, two A BET'S A BET PORTLAND, Ore.. March 25 Rev. William G. Ever- son of the First Baptist church paused in the middle of a fare- well address, stepped down from the pulpit and handed Mayor Earl Riley, n member of the church, a dollar bill. To the bewildered congrega- tion, Rev. Everson explained he wanted to leave no unpaid ciebls in Portland when he becomes PAULS VALLEY, March 25, Major Hoy or, chairman of the .Chamber of Commerce poultry committee, has announced that baby chicks purchased by the Chamber of Commerce will he ready for delivery to 4-H and KFA members Saturday, March A one-day poultry school will lie conducted with 'H. G. Ware, lion on the- successful raising of the chickens. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads pastor of a R i c h m o n Ind., church. The dollar, he said was to British Applaud Harriman for Job LONDON, March 25, British newspapers today ap- plauded the appointment of W. Avcrell Harriman as the new U. S. ambassador to the court of St. James's and paid a farewell tri- bute to the man he will replace John G. Winant. "How rich is America in men of integrity and ability that she can afford to send us two men of such stature in succession." tin- Daily Express said in an editorial. The Daily Telegraph said lltat Harriman "should prove a note- able addition to the long line of :listinguished Americans w h o snuure a bet he had lost with RT- colirt M I lc'' "James's." i and then returned to Peiping. iMirthcr evidence that Tai died in the crash of his Ami rican man- ned special plane near Nanking March 17 was reported today by Shun Pao. one of Shanghai's most reliable newspapers. A correspondent for the paper said the body of Tai Li, chief of the suprinii; military council's bureau of investigation and sta- tistics, had been identified by his own chief of .staff, Li Chtian-Shi, although it was badly burned. MIAMI. March 25, fourth annual stampede and rodeo will tie held at the fair- grounds July 111 to 21. The event is sponsored tacit year by the roundup club, the Junior Chamber of Commerce and the Lions club. IF YOU DON'T GET YOUR PAPER Sometimes the neighbor's dog will carry your Ada News away before you get it from the porch or the boy fails to leave it. In case you miss your paper Call No. 4, before p. m. week days and a. in. Sundays and another, copy will be de- livered to you. Circulation Department Phone 4 why the security council must be prepared to function continuous- ly. If the United Nations is to endure, there must be no excuse or need for any nation to take the law into its own hnnds." A few hours before the council met in the newly-converted gym- nasium of Hunter college, leaders had agreed that today's session should be held to formalities of welcome und speed-making and that discussion of the Iranian issue, which has been cased con- siderably by the reported Rus- sian agreement under which So- viet troops are already supposed to be moving out of Iran, would be delayed until tomorrow. Greatly Honored Mr. Trumnn declared that "we are greatly honored that the United Nat.'ons has chosen the site in ou.1 country for our home." and promised that the American people would do their best to makt the United Nations' representatives feel entirely at riomo here. He stressed the need for all the member nations to "remain united and continue to work to- gether, as they have fought to- gether, for peace and for free- dom." The American people, the pres- ident said, pledge "their whole- hearted co-operation to give to the United Nations the strength and the wi.Ijto maintain peace and freedom m this interdepend- ent world." Byrnes cpmparcd the new peace organization, which was completed London only last month, and U now beginning its permanent work in America, with the early history of the United States, which, he said, survived many trials before it became strongly established. O." the charter, he said that it Hoes not attempt to outlaw change "in an ever-changing world" but he stressed that it does "obligat- all the states, large and small alike, to refrain from the use of force or threat of Iranian-Russian Situation May Be Settled Soon By EDDY GILMORE MOSCOW. March 25, Tass announcement that Reid army forces arc withdrawing from Iran brought from well-in- formed foreign diplomatic ob- servers today the prediction that the entire Iranian-Russian ques- tion would shortly be settled to the satisfaction of both countries. These observers acclaimed the Tass announcement as a healthy sign. The development, coupled, with the news that the Red army also is withdrawing from Man- churia, was given wide publicity nnd contributed to a Kencrnl cas- 'nit of tension. Uoth Chinese nnd Iranian cir- cles expressed .satisfaction. Tass said the withdrawal from ran was being carried out in ac- with an agreement with the Iranian government and pre- dicted it would be completed within the next five or six weeks f nothing unforsecn takes place. The Russian press gave promin- ence to Tass dispatches from Teh- ran quoting Iranian Premier Ah- med Qavam as telling a p r e s conference last Saturday he be- ievcd a satisfactory solution to the dispute with Russia would found. force except Imv." in defense of the Ho Ping Pao, Chinese army newspaper, reported the occupa- tion of Fushun and said another central government column driv- ing up the Daircn-Mukden rail- road from the south had occupi- ed the rail center of Liaoyang, 30 miles south of Mukden. LiaoyanR is approximately halfway be- tween Mukden and the great steel center of Anshan. where the col- umn was reported yesterday. Tile Fushun battle report was the first indication of any serious clash between the two forces in the area, where observers have feared 'that such an engagement might provide tile spark needed to rekindle the smouldering civil war. Meanwhile, the communist new China Daily News published a Mancluirian dispatch saying that Gen. Chow Pao-Chung, command- er of the pro-communist third army of anti-Japanese alli- erl forces, had demanded recog- nition of his troops by Generalis- simo Chiang Kai-Shek. In a telegram to Chiang, Chow likewise demanded permission for entrance of Harbin, the dispatch said. Abolition of the government secret service and severe punish- ment of the assassins of Li Chao- Ling, chairman of the Sino-Rus- sian friendship association, who i was recently slain at Harbin, also 1 was demanded. CLINTON. March 25, commissioners have adopted a city ordinance regulation regula- ting the presence of liquid pe- troleum within the city limits. The new ordnance involves de- tailed precautions against fire Nobody desires for hazards caused by the presence nc told delegates to UNRRA's 'council meeting here "that UNR- Delay in consideration of the Iranian question came after the American group, headed by Byrnes and Edard R. Stcttinius, Jr., received word that putting it off for one day was agreeable to the Russian delegation under Ambassador Andrei Gromyko. Denies UNRRA in On Politics in Poland By ALEX SINGLETON ATLANTIC CITY. N. J., March 25, Minister of State "'hilip Noel-Baker called upon he United Nations today to rep- udiate n Polish demand for de- nial of UNRRA aid and asylum o political refugees. Ho denied the accusation by 'olish Minister of Welfare Jan Stanczyk that generals hostile to he new Polish government had Jocn placed in a position where hey could influence the politi- al thinking of displaced Poles. "NoboHv tleisirntt fnr Accounting Course For Vets Starling Night Classes for Two Weeki for Those Taking On-rhe-Job Training Starting tonight class will meet to teach business accounts and records for a number of vet- erans who are taking on-the-job training here. J. B. Walters announces that it will meet at o'clock tonight in the vocational department, Ada high school, and will continue five nights this week and five next week, two hours each night for a 20-hour course. Miss Bolon, Stillwater, Oklaho- ma A. and M. college, will teach and expects to be able to instruct the vets far enough that they can set up books and. with some supervision, 'carry' them until they complete their knowledge. The course is primarily for learning such work as groc- ?ry or filling station management jut is open to nil tui- 'ion and supplies furnished .hrougli the Veterans Adminis- ralion. Non-vets can also take he course, but will be required o pay tuition. Plan International Plane Terminal MANILA. March 25, newly-formed local corporation announced today it would take ver Niclson airport south of .lanila. under U. S. army lease ince 1941, for development into n international air terminal. The directors include Col. An- ders Soriano, a member of Gen- eral MacArthur's war-time staff, and Art Staurt, Transcontinental Western Air executive. THr PESSIMIST Br Dob BtlBVi. Jn of butane and propane gas in- stallations inside Clinton. ANADARKO, March 25. C. G. Frye, head of the Frye Fly- ing service here, has announced that .14 coyotes have been killed by "air hunters" in Caddo coun- ty so far this year. RA should maintain political movements attempting to stir up trouble within their homelands. Kngland has tele- phones in use, with annual calls totaling Both tele- phones and radios are controlled by the postal department in that country. Who recollects th' when stores gave away 'n automobile ever' Saturday afternoon 'C th' holder o' th' lucky ticket? Any Government is only as Rood as th' peopla 're willin' V pay fer.   

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