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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 22, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 22, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             for H. man hou., eut th. itfow cKopeoy jf Fair west: partly cloudy east; scattered .showers extreme east endinj tonight; Saturday (air. 42nd 289 THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS CIO-UAW Meeting Faces Major Issues ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1946 Jackson, Goering In Angry Clash Over Testimony By DANIEL DELUCE Reuther Challenges Thomas for Presidency; Proposal to Double Dues Is Due By FELIX B. WOLD ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Mar. 22, politics and dues commanded the attention todaj of the CIO United Auto Workers military tribunal that the war crimes trial was liable to drag on into August. The sco-'-Jing former rcichs- rnarshal returned to the prison- ers' dock at a. m. after eight days on the witness stand in his Walter P. Reuther for the union Thomas, incum- bent since 1938, bluntly inviting Reuther. UAW vice-president, to enter the contest. At the same time a proposal to double the membership dues, from SI a month to formally was placed before the auto union in a rasping voice when the defendant again at- I tempted to review "my relations cd-h lroport lhat :Z K f- Ihacl not been port that Reuther had decided to into August. A bitter scene developed as Gen. R. A. Rudenko. chief Soviet prosecutor, concluded his inter- rogation demanding to know if Goerir.e would admit he "was the second man in the murder of millions of innocent people." shouted Goering, "be- cause I didn't know about them or cause them. Millions of Ger- mans did not know about them cither.'" Almost snarling. Goering ex- plained that he collaborated in seek his job, welcomed the Gen- eral Motors strike leader to make a try. Reuthcr has yet to com- mit himself publicly on accept- ing nomination in next week's convention elections. "I say, 'come on in, thc water's if Reuther wants to Thomas said, repeating his fre- quent expression that the UAW- CIO was a "democratic union with offices open to all. Assets Dwindling Rapidly Addes said in hiss report that liquid assets at the end Paralysis Victim Helped by Shriners an oftKoW legiance for the simple soldier. That sort of allegiance to a su- preme leader occurs elsewhere and I don't think I need be any clearer as to what I mean." Charges Filed Of Embezzlement Against Hawkins A criminal complaint filed in the Franklin Bourland justice of peace court charges Highway Patrolman Harvey Hawkins with embezzlement. The complaint was signed by Ray Roberts and filed Friday morning by Vol Crawford, county attorne-y. It is alleged that the incident in 1945. happened August 15. It is alleged that on August 15, with certain property, namely a .22 calibre automatic rifle valued at about S30 which Hawkins re- of safe keeping. for stated in the complaint Hawkins "embezzled and It that converted the rifle to his own use and to a use and purpose not in trie due and lawful execution of trust aj an agent." The state issued subpoenas to Dud Lester. Ray Roberts, Joy Roberts, Billy Joe Adams. Jimmie Macsas and Norman Bowen. When Hawkins was arraigned before Judge Bourland, he had his bondsmen with him in addi- tion to a number of close friends, them business people in Ada. bond was set at by the judge, who said that that was the usual of bond set for any felony. The bond was signed by Julia M. Smith, Wick Adair and Lottie M. Braly. Preliminary hearing was set for 10 o'clock Monday morning, Hawkins insisted that below" that figure by the end of this month. He said this was due partly be- cause of "heavy operating de- ficits' of the last nine months. He added if it were not for year- ly assessments "we would have scraped thc bottom of the barrel months ago." Major Crabfree Flew That P-51 Wosn't Major Watson Who Flew in Lost Sunday Whoever told a reporter Sun- day that it was Major Watson who flew in to Chunccy Field in a P-51 while a CAP-sponsored air show was in progress was wrong. II, was Major Jean Ernest Crabtrec. flying here to inspect a plane which was stuck in the mud and to check on possibility of its removal. Major Jean is now stationed at Tinker Field after two years overseas with the 397th Group of the 599th Bombing Squadron. His mother, Mrs. Ernest Crab- tree, makes her home in Ada. ShoweFof Hals In State Ring Today Speairs Would Succeed Carter, Darnell Will Go After Same Post Minnie Rose 14, paralyzed from the waist down for the Shrinnu leaves Memphis, Tenn. for St. Louis Missouri bhrme Hospital where she will receive treatment made ossible receive treatment made possible nnd roving0" T and Coving on Tcnn She is shown leaving Memphis with John Walker, left, Covington, Herbert Waterbury, Memphis and Will Roper of FIVE CENTS THE COPY Railroad's Mascot Is Now at Hospital Railroaders and Shriners Bring Crippled Girl To Hospital for Treatment, Climaxing 'Story-Book Tale' ST. LOUIS, March Rose Webb, 14- year-old crippled girl of Rialto, Tenn., arrived here today aboard the Illinois Central's Chickasaw. Limited and was removed to the Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children to receive treatment for her three-year affliction. Says Black Market Packers Talk About Is Just a 'Myth' DES MOINES, March OPA Director Walter D. Kline declared today the black market in moat which packers have been talking about is a "myth." "What the packers ore com- tr.e preliminary troughl to court hearing be would be rt-a-.lv by Mondn FIND PLANE U'RECK NEAR EfFAULA reckage of a civilian OKLAHOMA CITY, March 22 shower of hats floated in- to the state's political ring today as several democratic candidates made formal announcements of intentions to seek offices. A former secretary of the stale hoard of agriculture. Ed Speairs, i-.-rjugni 10 court as soon as nos- his candidacy and the said that thev "f Pre- 'sent secretary. Frank C. Carter, who will retire at the end of his present term, said he would throw his support behind Speairs. Bill Darnell, enforcement of- TTT4T-t A ,r "f tl10 Ktato trix commission Ei-FALLA.. OKla.. March 22, and department of safety an- nounced he also would seek the secretary of state post. Darnell was a candidate for governor 20 years ago. C. W. King, assistant attorney for the tax commission, also said he would seek the secretary of state nomination. -State Auditor C. C. Childers also was reported ready to run secretary of state. Frank E. Brown, a veteran Shawnee printer, announced he would run for state labor com- missioner to succeed W. A. (Pat) Murphy, who said he would not seek reelection. James A. Parkinson, head de- putv examiner and inspector an- nounced he would be a candidate for examitiM- and inspector if John Rogers does not seek re- election. Rogers is ill and not exprcti-d to run. Cianp reported missing since March 14 and the body of its Pilot. A. H. Mullinax, Greenville, S. C.. wore located yesterday near here by two members of thc arrr.y search and rescue service Mullinax. who left Oklahoma March 14 but failed to ar- rive at Fort Smith. Ark., was vice of the newly formed Lincoln Air Freight. Inc., Lincoln. JWEATHERJ west; part- lv cloudy rast; Fratterrd showers extreme i tiding tonight: Sat- urday fiiir; cooler east tonight- tonight near Panhandle to lower 40 rise where. Extended Forecast temperatures Kansas, Nebraska. Oklahoma Saturday; and in Missouri Sunday; cooling or Tuesday: tempera- tures will average 5 degrees above normal; showers eastern ..Iissouri Saturday; and over most o. area Tuesday; precipitation wsll average light to locally modtrtu. ON IT __ MOSCOW. March 22, Soviet press displayed prominent- ly today a Tass dispatch from London saying the Iceland socia- list youth organization had circu- lated a leaflet demanding im- mediate evacuation of American troops from Iceland in accordance with the United States-Iceland treaty. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads plaining of is that they are in danger of losing their govern- ment Kline said in an interview. "They should say so and not make charges that can- not be backed up with facts. "If Black market prices are be- ing paid for meat, then it must be selling at more than ceiling prices on the retail market, and I don't believe the average retail- er of meat is dishonest any more than the average meat packer." The packers have charged that eastern slaughter houses were paying over-ceiling prices for live cattle in midwest markets, and thus diverting beef into "il- legitimate channels." Kline said a large number of s m a 11, independent slaughter houses had been established in eastern states which have been licensed by the U. S. department of agriculture. Her explained that these small packers were licensed to grade their own beef wiiilc large mid- tllewcst packers arc federally in- spccted and the government in- spectors grade the beef. This may result, he explained, n the eastern packers paying the op, or premium prices for cattle which under federal inspection would grade only for lower-grade commercial or utility beef. The packers' problem is with the agriculture department, not the OPA, Kline said. Fight Grasshoppers Civil Fleet to Combat Them in North Iran A crowd of about 500 persons greeted the arrival of the little girl, including William N. Wood- field Jr.. of San Francisco, im- perial potentate of the Shrine of North America, and George F. Morrison. St. Louis potentate and treasurer of the hospital. Train Makes Special Stop The train made a special stop at Rialto last midnight to permit Minnie Rose and her wheel chair to be put aboard. Thc trip to St. Louis for medi- cal treatment was the climax to a story book tale that had its beginning almost a year ago. Minnie Rose sat on the front porch of her ramshackle farm home waving at all the trains that went by. A conductor stop- ped his train in front of her house one day and got acquaint- ed. He found out that she was crippled. Became Railroad Mascot The word was passed down thc I. C. line. She became thc rail- road's mascot and seldom a day went past that some of the crew- men didn't throw her dolls, can- dy or toys. They even bought her a wheelchair. Then the railroad men and Shriners decided to send the girl to St. Louis for treatment. Ar- rangements were made for last night's midnight rendezvous with the Chickasaw Limited. May Ask Now For Draff For One More Year Patterson, Eisenhower Agree on Revised Con- tinuance, No Induction Of Fathers WASHINGTON. Mar. Dwight D. Eisenhower's advocacy of an indefinite draft law extension was modified today by Secretary of War Robert Pat- terson, who said Eisenhower now wants a one-year extension. Patterson told thc. house mili- tary committee, before which he and Eisenhower testified yester- day, that he and thc chief of staff low are agreed on a one-year continuance of the law, which ex- )ires May 15. Patterson said he and Eisen- hower were in full agreement hat length of service under cx- ension legislation should be lim- ted to 18 months, that fathers hould not bo inducted, and that ill fathers now in uniform should ic released by late summer. He is willing, Patterson said, to ccept a limitation that thc in- duction be held to me between 8 and 25, both inclusive. Members of both senate and ouse military committees ap- carcd to share a general feeling nat selective service should be ept aliv" beyond its May 15 cx- iration date. But that was no learcut agreement on how long Byrnes Testifies The two committees returned to the subject after long testi- of it in secret ses- by: 1. Secretary of State Byrnes, who was reported by members to have told the senate committee that those charged with responsi- bility for the nation's security are alarmed lest there not be enough new soldiers and sailors to re- place those now entitled to come home. 2. Secretary of thc Navy For- restal, quoted as telling the sen- ators that the navy could not hope to get the men it needs if selective service dies. 3. Secretary of War Patterson, who asked both house and senate committees to rccommed a one- year extension. Eisenhower Outlines Defense 4. General of thc Army Dwight D. Eisenhower, who told the house group that the world situ- ation is such that thc draft should be extended, not for a year but indefinitely. E i s e n howcr was quoted as telling tho senators that "the military security of the na- tion in future wars" requires among other things "an outlying base system, built around modern land-based air power, backed by necessary ground and service for- Stalin Asserts None For War Tclli AP He's Convinced Neither the Nations Nor Their Armies Striving for New War But Want Peace; Praises UN and Irs Principles of Preservation of Equal Rights LONDON, March Minister Stalin told the Associated Press today "I am convinced that neither the nations nor their armies are striving for a new the Moscow radio said. MOSCOW, March Soviet expedition organized by the ministry of agriculture and the Russian civil airfleet takes off today to combat grasshoppers in acres of northern Iran. The newspaper Evening Mos- >w said in an interview with I. I. Sazonov, chief of a special sec- tion of the airfleet, that the Iran- ian government had requested Russia to fight the grasshoppers from the air. Sazonov was quoted as saying the work would be fin- ished by Juno 1. The grasshoppers were said to be destroying enormous plots of planted fields, including cotton plantations in southern Azerbai- jan. Read the Ada News Want Ads. High Jap Military Leaders Involved Grand Imperial Headquar- ters, War Ministry Blamed For Enemy Airmen Law SHANGHAI. March 22, The Japanese grand imperial headquarters and the war minis- try were charged with responsi- bility for Japan's enemy airmen's law in a statement read today at thc trial of four Japanese charg- ed with thc death of three Doo- littlc fliers. These- two agencies "installed enactment of this law" and made it "retroactive to fit it to past said a statement of Mayor Itsuro Hata, w h o was prosecutor at thc court martial which sentenced eight Doolittle airmen to die before a firing squad. Five of the Americans were reprieved. American prosecutors they were convinced th............ statement and other evidence would he the basis for indict- ments against prominent mem- bers of the Japanese- military re- I'imc responsible for promulga- ting the law. which was consider- ed a blanket go-ahead for t h e execution of all enemy fliers.- Hata died of ulcers in Tokyo early this year. He had sent his statement voluntarily to al- lied headquarters when he learn- ed he was to be arrested. 5. Gen. Carl Spaatz, chief of the army air forces, who was said to have warned the senate group that "the possibilities of atomic warfare further accentuate the need for the maintenance of ade- quate air forces in being." Summing up the testimony af- ter the closed senate committee session, Acting Chairman Austin (R-Vt) gravely told reporters it was to this effect: "That the international situa- tion is such as to make more clear the necessity of extending thc selective service act." Impressive Case Senator Bridges (R-NH) des- cribed thc witnesses as having nrnspntnri "a pretty impressive i presented case." Most members of the house committee, .however, balked at Euenhower's request for indefin- ite extension and displayed little sympathy for Patterson's idea of a one year extension. Members who usually can tell the turn in the house group said that barring a change in senti- ment an extension of not more than nine months, or until March 1 at thc outside, is the best bet. Many s_.id the continuation might be even shorter. ---------------------K-------------------- What Stalin Told AP Man Text of Questions And Answers Between Corres- pondent Gilmorc and Stalin LONDON. March following is text of a ques- ion and answer interview with 'rime Minister Stalin by Associ- itccl Press Correspondent Eddy Tilmore as broadcast by the Mos- ow radio today: The correspondent of the As- ociated Press, Mr. Gilmoro, ask- ed Prime Minister Stnlin the fol- lowing questions connected with the international situation. Below we give Mr. Gilmorc's questions and Stalin's replies. Question: What significance do you attribute to the United Na- tions organization as a means of preserving international peace? Answer: I attribute great sig- nificance to thc United Nations organization, since it is a serious instrument for thc preservation of peace and international secur- ity. The strength of this interna- tional organization consists in the fact that it is based on the prin- ciple of the equality of righ of states and not on the principles of the domination of some states over others. Can Play Positive Role If the United Nations organiza- tion succeeds in continuing to preserve the principle of equal rights, it will undoubtedly play a great positive role in the cause of guaranteeing universal peace and security: Question: What in your opinion has caused the present fear of war felt by many people in many countries? Answer: I am convinced that neither the nations nor their arm- ies are striving for a new war. They want peace and are striving for a guarantee of peace. That means that the present fear of war is caused not from that quar- ter. What To Do Now Question: What should the gov- ernment of the freedom-loving countries now do for tho pres. vation of peace and order in the "They want Stalin said in tno interview as broadcast from Moscow, "and are striving for a guarantee of peace." "That Stalin added, "that the present fear of war is caused not from that quarter. I think that the present fear of war is caused by the activities of certain political groups who oc- cupy themselves with propaganda for a new war and who are there- by sowing the seeds of discord and lack of confidence." UNO "Serious Instrument" Moscow said AP Correspondent Eddy Gilmorc asked Stalin what significance he attributed to the United Nations as a means of pre- serving international peace, and Stalin replied: "I attribute great significance to the United Nations organiza- tion since it is a serious instru- ment for the preservation 'of peace and international security. "The strength of this interna- tional organization consists in the fact that it is based on the prin- ciple of the equality of the rights of states and not on the principles of the domination of some states over others. "If thc United Nations organi- zation succeeds in continuing to preserve the principle of equal rights, it will undoubtedly play a great, positive role in the cause of guar.-mteeing universal peace and security." What Governments Can Do Stalin then was asked: "What should the governments of the freedom loving countries now do for the preservation of (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) Iran Stands With U.S. For UN Meeting Official Says Negotiation! With Russia Have Failed, Conditions Worsen NEW YORK, March Iran, which has protested to the United Nations the presence of Russian troops on its oil-rich ter- ritory, formally aligned itself with the United States today in opposing a Soviet request that the meeting of the 11-nation se- curity council be dclavcd 16 days. Such postponement which would set back the opening meet- ing from next Monday to April "inevitably result in increased harm to the interests of Hussein Ala. Iranian am- bassador, said in a letter to Try- five Lie, UNO secretary general. Unanimous agreement by tho members of the security council is needed to postpone the meet- ing, and opposition to the delay already has been voiced by sentatives of China. Australia and Great Britain. Iran is not a mem- ber of the security council. Letter Asks Prompt Action Hussein Ala's letter, released here last night by UNO officials, said the Iranian government hop- ed that consideration of its caso against the Soviet Union "will not be delayed." "At the conference In London decision was postponed upon the merits of the earlier dispute pending negotiation bewteen the the letter said and add- ed: Vardaman Accused By Banker Of Lack of Judgment Secret Work Begun Back in Year 79 Company Started Making Special Ball Bearings For Nordcn Bombsight PHILADELPHIA, March 22.   Industries, Inc., announc- ed today that it secret government manufacture of special ball bear- ings for the Nordcn bombsight in S. F. Wollmar, executive vice- president of thc firm, said the Lansdalc (Pa) plant produced i-cutors s a I d hall bearings for the bombsight iced that Hata's so small they could be oiled only with hyperdcrmic needles. "These precision bearings had to be made with the utmost Woolmar said. "Machine tools had to be ilcsiyncd a n d workers trained to operate them and only now do all our employes know of this pat of our war pro- duction begun 17 years ago." SKF said its war contracts for ball and roller bearings will end April 1. BARTLESVILLE, March 22, I.T) annual junior chamber of commerce sponsored rural" track meet will be held here April 13. ELK CITY. March 22, When a waitress at the Story hotel here turned in an order, "roast beef, cut the Henry the chef, came back with, 'the potatoes are already cut." (Continued on Page 2 Column (i) Ebrife Withdraws Name from Race Walker and Hcnslcy Into Freeholder Board Filing; Registration Ends Tonight One change and one new name added to the candidates for places on tho board of freehold ers to be elected April 2 consti tutc developments since Thurs- day noon. II. A. Ebrite withdrew hi? name as candidate for one o! Ward 3 representatives: Ree Walker and Joe Hensley filed foi Ward 3. Filing will close Saturday of this .week at !i o'clock, according to Joe Beck, county election board secretary, and can be clone at the county clerk's office when be isn't available. Registration for the city run- off election of April 2 closes at midnight tonight. This registration period had to be brief because it could not be- gin until after the vote of last Tuesday but has to end 10 days before the election. Transfers, of course, can con- tinue on up to election dav. Two city races will be decided April J. D. Willough- by and Burl Oliver for commis- sioner of public works and prop- erty, and between Ray Martin and Drew Thomas for city clerk and commissioner of finance. Negro Bound Over To District Court Hazel Wilson, a negro woman, who is charged with assault with intent to l.j'1. entered a plea of not guilty and waived prelimin- ary hearing Thursday morning before Franklin Bourland, jus- tice court judge. She was bound over to district court and was released on the same bond that was put up be- fore the hearing, but she agreed to make a new bond Saturday, according to Judge Bourland. Her bond was set at She is charged with having WA.1HINUTUN, Mar. Hardin. St. Louis banker, said today he considered Com- modore James K. Vardaman, Jr. "utterly lacking in the balanced judgment that any member of the federal reserve board should possess." Hardin, executive vice presi- dent of the Mississippi Valley Trust Co., gave this opinion to a :enato banking subcommittee at learings on the nomination of 'resident Truman's naval aide to the banking board. Hardin was one of three St. Louis bankers summoned by Sen- ator Donnell an oppon- ent of the appointment, to testi- fy on Vardaman's qualifications. The others were James P. Hicock, "These negotiations have failed. Meanwhile, March 2, the date fixed by the Tripartite treaty, has passed and the Soviet troops have not been withdrawn. The obli- gation of the Soviet government to withdraw iU forces from Iran u not a proper subject for nego- tiation under 'he charter of tha United Nations or the constitu- tion of Iran. Conditions Intensified "The delays thus far permitted have intensified the critical con- ditions in my country caused by tho failure cT the Soviet Union to withdraw these troops. The state of affairs is very grave and fur- ther delays would inevitably res- ult in increased harm to the in- terests of Iran. "I shall be greatly obligee! if you will have the kindness to communicate these views imme- diately to the members of the se- curity council." Council members are the Uni- ted States, Russia, Great Britain, France, China, Australia. Brazil- Poland. Holland, Egypt, and Mex- Chinese Group Is Seriously Worried League Warm That Man- churian May Plunge China Into Civil War CHUNGKING, March. 22. The influential democratic league Radcliffe Hardin said he had known Vnrdaman 20 years and was first favorably impress- ed with his work for the Recon- struction Finance Corporation in the St. Louis area. In 1937 Vardaman became pres- ident of the Tower Grover Bank and Trust company of St. Louis and Hardin said this seemed to bring a "Ho became egotistical, arro- gant and critical of people I re- garded as Hardin said. 'My opinion is that Vardaman is not qualified to serve on the federal reserve board. He added that his estimate was based upon "cumulative expert ence over the years. Red Cross Drive Past Mark Still mounting toward the goal or Pontotoc county, the la-Jfl Red -.ross Fund Campaign went to Friday, passing the seventy-five per cent mark. The quota for the county of still challenged local of- ficials, who called for a complete canvass by all workers having vet to contact persons in their districts. Oscar L. Parker, county chair- man for the drive, urged that all school districts outside Ada re- port contributions as soon as pos- ible. LAWTON, March 22, Mayor Thomas J. Martin, Jr.. savannah, Ga.. has been named Marshal for the Lawton Army Jay parade. STILLWATER. Mar., 22, Dklahnmn A. M. college will old its annual feeders' day pro- ram for livestoekmen on thc col- cge campus, Saturday, April 20. The program features reports n current experimental work bi- te college. 2 ed Wlth ;i kn'fe Play British nrmy signal corps used incident that occurred last week carrier pigeons in enemy when a ncgrj man was cut about territory during the war to carry me nccK. j out vitai information. truce teams be sent there as soon as possible. At the same time, both govern- ment and communist dispatches reported new troop -activities in that vast territory and indicated renewed fighting might be ex- pected. From Shanghai came the sur- prising news that Leo D. Stur- geon, state department veteran dispatclu-d to Dairen only a week ago, had returned unexpectedly, without public explanation. Stur- geon, consul at Dairen before tho war and presumably sent thero In remain indefinitely, unnffiehl- ly was reported to 'have sent a lengthy message to Washington. He declined comment. The democratic league, third largest of China's political groups, said that unless truce teams soon went into Manchuria, General Marshall's recent achievement-! in negotiating a civil-strife ending truce would be completely offset The word "war" means want more cows" in the Sanskrit language. TH' PESSIMIST Dob DUnkf. Jr. It's fortunate woman don't have a real sense she could never love man for laughin'. at 'im. It all depends whether a feller with a straighr shootin' wife is lucky er unlucky.   

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