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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 20, 1946 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 20, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Spring ornvc for of the United p. m. Partly cloudy with mild temper- atures tonicht; Thursday cloudy and mild; scattered showers. THE ADA EVENING NEWS 42nd 287 BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 1MB FIVE THE CQpy DODDS WINS MAYOR RACE, TWO RUN-OFFS Elected Mayor Li'Ki: B. nnnns Finance Run-Off DREW THOMAS RAT MARTIN Tony Sold Steer At 40 Cents a Pound Pontotoc County Girl Did Well at Tulsa Orr.if.cd from a list published earlier this  1-H and FKA contestants at the Oklahoma Livestock show and rodeo. Reserve grand champion was Richard Moehle's FFA entry. Young Clark was grand cham- pion at the and 19-14 shows and Moehle took top honors with bin entry in 13-15 at the same fhnw. Clark's entry was FFA grand champion at the 1045 Royal show in Kansas City, and a entry at the fairgrounds exhibits in Ok- lahoma City brought him another grand champion in the lamb class. He alsn took reserve grand hon- Meat Shortage 01 Critical Nature Threatens Nation Hy The Aiioclattd Prtii Drastic slaughter reductions and the threat of a critical meat shortage in this country were re- ported today by meat packers and retailers, who blamed the situation on OPA price ceilings and the growing black market. "We are facing a meat shortage such as we've never seen Joseph W. Stevens, field secre- tary of the individual retail groc- ers and meat dealers assocciation, said in St. Louis yesterday. Packing companies claim they are unable to slaughter cattle at a profit under the OPA ceilings and that they cannot compete in buying cattle with black market buyers. One company official said in Chicago yesterday that black market buyers were able to make an average profit of a head. The slaughter rate in the major Kansas City packing plants has dropped from 180 to IB an hour, with employes laid off. Slaughter rates down as much as 75 per cent were reported in St. Loins. Omaha, Sioux City. DCS Moines, Tulsa, Louisville, Los Angeles, Indianapolis, San An- tonio, Wichita, Topeka and Okla- loma City. Some smaller plants n the midwest have closed down completely. Thomas E. Wilson, chairman of Wilson Co., told the company's "stockholders in Chicago ycster- lay that the growing black mar-  f midwt'stern beef and would shortagfs in the west, mid- and south. ToU! 64 1-3 v o t e began Wednesday, today and will continue to and includ- ing. Friday, March 22. There arc those who have qua- lified, by residence or age, since close of the recent registration period, and there are others who needed to register and failed to get it done in time for the first voting. Registrars Same No change has been announc- ed in the lineup of registrars for the city precincts recently ef- fective in the pro-primary period. Filing for a place on the board of freeholders must be done by Saturday. March 23. at 5 p. m. and can be done with Joe Beck, secretary of the county election board, or with Claude Bobbitt, county clerk, when Beck is not available. 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 ,1 3 3 3 4-1 4-2 4-3 4-4 Total 59 108 fll BO loss 52 75 48 OK 24 67 10S 81 "B l-l 1-2 1-3 1-4 1-5 2-1 2-2 2-3 3-1 3-2 3-3 3-4 4-1 4-2 4-3 4-4 Total Vc. 187 139 144 146 143 !I9 22.1 192 51 109 151 63 125 259 141 147 2119 No 19 31 n 36 17 42 70 37 fl7 .11 61 18 51 33 52 [herokee Indian Museum Planned OKLAHOMA CITY. March 20. Cherokee Indian mu- seum will be established at the memorial to Sequoyah. noted Cherokee sage, near Sallisaw, Don Stauffer, director of state parks, said today. As soon as arrangements for the museum can be completed, contributions of old Cherokee relics will be sought frnt" the public. The project, he- said, should be underway within a few weeks. Stauffer said the state planning antl resources board is preparing a pamphlet of information on the Cherokee leader, to be distributed at the memorial and to be mailed to Oklahomans upon request. Plane Crashes Near Fort Smith Pay Increases Urged For Armed Forces Patterson and Forrestal Quote Reasons for Asking 20 Per Cent Boost WASHINGTON, March 20, WP> was urged by the secretaries of war and navy to- day to grant a 20 per cent pay increase to everybody in the two Russia, Continues Troop Maneuvers In Iranian Areas By JOHN M. IIIGHTOWER WASHINGTON, March today was reported continuing her troop maneuvers in Iran despite that government's appeal to the United Nations se- curity council for help in getting Soviet forces out of the country. Late reports reaching officials were described in the tense mid- dle eastern situation as unchang- ed with main attention for future developments still directed to- ward the Kurdish areas of Iran Turkey, and Iraq, who Informants may not be services. They advanced these argu- ments to a senate military sub- committee: 1. The cost of living has gone up. 2. Modern warfare is n highly technical business calling for men with greater skills and education than were required a few years ago. Secretary of War Patterson said, too, that a higher rate of pay for enlisted men would stim- ulate enlistments. Secretary of the Navy Forres- tal told the committee the navy is losing high ranking officers every day because of more at- tractive financial offers in civi- lian life. He said the pay of officers remained "relatively steady" 1UOII, while living costs have increased about per cent since that year. Legislation for n 20 per cent ncrcase in army-navy pay and illowances is now before the senate committee. ors at tin- Western Stock show in Denver this year. Moehle's entries were judged grand champions at the 1945 and 19-10 Enid shows. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads FORT SMITH, Ark., Marcil 20 The Camp Chaffee public r -lations office reported today that a privately-owned advanced army training plane piloted by a civilian was believed to have crashed near Fort Smith. Tin; pro said the plane, rn route from Oklahoma City to Greensboro. N. C., had been scheduled to stop at Fort Smith March 14 for refueling hut had not arirved. The office said that the plane's owner, Lincoln Aero- nautical Company of Lincoln, -Neb., was seeking its where- abouts. GARF1ELD COUNTY MAN KILLED IN TRUCK WRECK ENID, Okla., March Wallace Boring, 57, of Hillsdale, Garfield'county, was killed last night when a truck plunged into a ditch. Herbert Lee Grouse, 31. Hills- dale, driver of the truck, was taken to an Enid hospital suffer- ing from n broken nose, a head injury and possible internal in- juries. WASHINGTON, March bill to divorce all federal farm credit agencies from the agriculture department moved over to the senate today after the house voted its approval, 239 to JIO. late yesterday. The measure would consolidate the agencies under an indepen- dent governing board. named said that Iran's appeal to the council, charging the presence of Red Army troops in violation of a Soviet-Iranian-British treaty and interference by Soviet agents in Iranian affairs, had had ab- solutely no effect so far as could be told here on conditions inside Iran. American officials predicted that this country will support ful- ly the troubled nation's appeal to the council for prompt action. And indications arc that of the 11 council members, Iran will get an easy majority for putting its case on the agenda for early consider- ation in the sessions scheduled to open in New York next Monday. Officials do not discount the possibility that Russia may ob- ject. However, since only a ma- jority is required and since'Rus- sia normally can count only on Polish support to back up any op- position, the required seven votes for consideration seem assured. Strikerslfferef Boost in Wages CHICAGO. March 20. International Harvester com- pany today announced it had of- fered striking members of the ClO-United Farm Equipment and Metal workers Union an im- mediate general wage increase of 18 cents an hour, provided the men return to wort? and settle other differences in further bar- gaining. The lii-ccnt increase figure was recommended by a government fact-finding panel but the com- pany said its position up to now was that it could not grant the increase without first obtaining government assurance of price relief. The union had accepted the panel report. Approximately Harvest- er workers have been on strike at 10 plants in three states since Jan. 21. Two Army Planes Craih In California Mountains, Be- lieve 33 Men Arc Dead SAN FRANCISCO, March 20, of two big army planes in northern California mountains yesterday apparently took a death toll of III) army and lavy men, whose bodies ground crews labored in difficult ter- rain today to recover. Twenty-three bodies, some of hrm buried several foot in snow, 'lad been found early today at :he scene of a C-47 crash in the Sierra, Nevada, a mile from the ghost town of Hobart Mills and seven miles from Truckee, Calif Three others listed on the flight from Stockton, Calif., bound for Ogden, Utah, were believed in the yet inaccessible flight control compartment of the wreckage. A ground squad pushed toward the wreckage of a B-2H which crashed with seven crewmen into the top of a 3.820-font peak near I.ivermore. miles southeast of San Francisco. The bomber came from Hickam Field. Honolulu. Its radio 'reported engine trouble several hours before the plane plummeted to earth 10 feet from the top of the peak. Witnesses said they saw the C- 47 explode in air, and Captain Harold Simer. commanding the Reno, Nov., army air base, said the wreckage indicated a wing, which had not been found, was blown off before the crash. Snow piled as high as 12 feet in drifts. Army workers and volunteers who reached the C-47 wreckage by snowmobile toiled through the night by campfire and flashlight in continuing snow to recover the frozen bodies, some of which were severely mangled. _ The D-29 had been missing since early morning yesterday. A private plane pilot reported dis- covery of the wreckage late yes- terday after an extensive search had been ordered. The bomber pilot had reported his engines were "cutting up" as he ap- proached the mainland and last radio contact with the ground was made at a. m. Slaughtering Af Low Ebb al 0. Packing Plants Willoughby, Oliver Survive Close Race, Thomas vs. Martin Newcomer to Political Campaigni, Dodds Sweeps All 16 Precincts; Freeholder Board Proposal Wins Big Majority Ada citizens turned out a moderately heavy vote Tues- day in Iheir first post-war city election, selected Luke Dodds, making his first political campaign, as mayor and loft un- settled who is to be commissioner of finance and who will be commissioner of public works and property for the new term that begins in May. J. D. Willoughby, present public works commissioner, remains in the running against Burl Oliver, for eight years an employe of tiie street department and recently returned from service with the Seabees in the Southwest Pacific. It is Oliver's first political race. Ray Martin, finance sioner by appointment, making his first campaign for public of- fice, faces the challenge of Drew Thomas. Propos.il Gops Over The proposal to hold an elec- tion of a board of freeholders to study tin- city charter with a view to revision of it went over in a big way, with votes for, to against. WASHINGTON. March 30 fund for navi- gation, flood control and other war department civil functions neared the end of its legislative course today. First big money bill of its kind I since early in the war, it passed the senate yesterday and moved quickly to a conference commit- tee for action on amendments. The conferees will approve or reject a increase over the originally author- ized in the house bill. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads OKLAHOMA CITY, March 20. was reported at its lowest ebb in history at Ok- lahoma City packing plants to- day, and local cattle receipts were estimated at 40 to 50 per cent of the 1945 total for the same date. Packing house operators and authorities at the Oklahoma City livestock yards, who were inclin- ed to attribute the shortage to black market activities, said the situation here probably is more serious than in any other part of the country. They pointed out that elsewhere receipts are off only about 25 to 30 per cent. Packing plant executives cited the recent 16-cent hourly wage increase awarded meat packing employes and inadequate ceilings set by OPA as factors contribut- ing to the shortage. No official layoffs have been reported at local houses, but op- erators said many of the killing ;nngs have only enough work to  y formal ceremonies as author- by law, .1 act requiring iri'-marital physical examina- tions further obstructs proxy .vedding.s. Oklahoma law requires both parties to be present in person to be married, he said. The New York girl had writ- ten that she understood proxy manages could be arranged in Oklahoma by letter with two stand-ins. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ada TH' PESSIMIST By Dob DUnlti. Jr. Mrs. Outlier Harp's gran'- pa. who's spent th' last three winters in Kloridy, died any- how yisterday. No man, who has a wife an' used c.ir, ever lives a quiet life.   

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