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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 15, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             much is g about new flour bemg not so attractiv. to look at, we'd better begin practicing shutting our eyes or looking the other way so it won't cramp our appetite Showers and colder low- est 30-35 panliandlc; cloudy and colder Saturday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 283 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Time to Quit Ban On Daily Attacks In Congress On Russia WASHINGTON, March house lead- ership signalled for a halt today in the almost daily round of speeches critical of Russia or other World War II allies of the United States. There was no formal action, but party leaders passed the word that they feel the present delicate international situation calls for temperance in references to United Nations members. Privately, they told reporters they were disturbed by repeated ''inflammatory speeches, aimed mostly at Russia." There is no intent or desire to curtail the right of members to free speech on the house floor, they said, but the time is not appropriate for what one of them called "Rus.'iia-baiting." In recent weeks there have been almost daily jabs at Russia in one-minute house speeches. Great Britain also has come in for criticism, particularly since Winston Churchill's speech at Fulton, Mo. Oklahoma Bees Just Gotta Have Sugar During Winters They're Robbed of Honey in Summer, Have to Be Fed In Sorghum Flavors Honey They Store By GENE POTES OKLAHOMA CITY, March the sugar short- causing inconvenience for housewives, it causes near disaster for the bees, because it's all they've got to live on during the winter months. Woman Forger Gets Sentence of Two Years in Prison Josephine Martin was senten- ced by District Judge Tal Craw- ford Friday to two years in the state penitentiary on each of four charges of forgery. County Attorney Vol Crawford asked members of the city police force to arrest Martin Thursday. She was arrested Thursday after- noon and sentenced Friday morn- lr.c. She entered a plea of guilty before the district judge and was sentenced on the four charges. The 'ententes will all run con- currently. Martin was in the hands of fed- eral authorities until recently v.-.hen she was released on pro- bation early this week. County Attorney Crawford said that rhe would be taken to the penitentiary early next week. She passed the checks to mer- chants in Ada last year. Judge Challenges Anyone to Diagram Sentence by OPA OKLAHOMA CITY. March 15. District Judge BTA'er Broacidus today challeng- ed nn attorney to find an English teacher in Oklahoma City schools v.-h') cnuld diagram a sentence in an OPA t'-li-grarn from Washing- on of which an OPA l-it was argued. sentence: "No justification under en- forcement instruction No. 7 for settlement which does not involve payment to full extent of finan- cial ability to pay or for consent ;uriqn-tT.t for single damages." Brorddiis admittod that lie had J.rst believed that the sentence 4-tr.r.rired the OPA to settle the case for nngle damages, then de- it W. L. Murphy, attorney for the lumber company involved, ac- cxpteci the challenge and said he v.ou'.d have the diagram tomor- Joe C. Scott, president of the state board of agriculture, said to- day that the number of bee hives in Oklahoma has been reduced 25 per cent this winter because bee- keepers are unable to get sugar to feed the bees. Tin; trouble i.i, Scott says, that the bees have to have cane sugar for winter feeding. If they are given sorghum or some other form of sweetening, they'll store some of it away in the hives with the typical bee eye for a rainy day, and the honey later stored away in the summer season will taste of the sorghum. Cane Sugar Blends The cane sugar taste, on the other hand, blends with the hon- ey so nobody can tell the differ- ence. That's the bee that Oklahoma beekeepers will attempt to put in the OPA's bonnet when they meet here Tuesday to form a state association. The sugar ra- tion for bee-feeding is handled on ration boards, boards don't understand why the bees should be cut in on the short sugar sup- ply, the bees have to go without their winter food. After all. points out Scott, the bees arc robbed of their own sav- ings of honey every year, so it's only fair to try to keep them cat- ing during the winter. ItlR Industry Involved "We've got a honey industry in Oklahoma right Scott said. "We're trying to build it up to a 000 industry, but we can't do it if we can't maintain the bees. Now it's in the process of declining, unless we can do somelhing about it." The beekeepers also will try to find a means of combatting dis- eases which are hampering oper- ation of hives in the state, Scott said. a local basis by and where the Earth Shocks Cause Worry In California Earth Slides Break Los An- geles Aqueduct, Huge Boulders Still on Move LOS ANGELES. March shocks felt over southern and central California early today caused earth slides which broke the Los Angeles aqueduct in Sand Canyon, in the Owens Valley, the City Bureau of Water and Power reported to- day. The California Institute of Technology Seismograph record- ed a lone scries of shocks from a.m., to a.m.. the heaviest at the latter hour, "about the size of the Long Beach earthquake of 1933." It would have been quite de- structive in a settled area, an observer stated. Its center was believed to have been about 100 miles ending north of Pasadena. The bureau reported shocks still were continuing at n late hour this morning, causing huge boulders to roll down the moun- tainside over on area about 10 miles long. The center of the disturbance, it was added, apparently was in Indian Wells Valley, near the community of Inyo-Kern in the high Sierra. One boulder tore off about 12 feet of the roof of the aqueduct and some five feel of the top of the sidewall. releasing about half the water flow and spilling 100.- 000 gallons across the state high- way. Some patrol roads along the aqueduct, main supply of Los Angeles' water, were closed by huge boulders or slipped down the mountain, the bureau said Holes were knocked in the roof of the aqueduct nt several points. Natives Moved for Atom Bomb Test Trudging across the sandy beach at Bikini Atoll In the Marshall Island group, natives carry their few belongings to waiting LST which will transport them to their new homo on Rongerik Atoll. The coming Army-Navy atom bomb test forced the natives to leave their old Tele- The suit ad asked treble damages, but following receipt of the telegram Murphy and the OPA aprccd to settle for single Sidney Fcinburg. Washington OPA official, then testified in a disposition he had not intended to authorize any settlement short of treble damages or financial ability to pay, and the OPA fought to 'withdraw the settle- ment. Murphy sought to dismiss the OPA motion, balked, saying he but Broaddus now believes the sentence meant the suit could r.ot be settled for single damages. Kuominfang Wants Friendship of Reds Also Wants Renovation Of Chinese Government Machinery By SPENCER MOOSA CHUNGKING, March Kuomintang congress to- day formally urged the Chinese government to foster true friend- ship with Russia. A resolution adopted by the party meeting said this friend- ship should be based on a respect for China's sovereign rights and the preservation of world peace. The action was taken after the congress heard charges from sev- eral government officials that Soviet forces extended their stay in Manchuria in violation of one agreement after another and loot- ed the territory. The party congress, in session I since March 1, postponed ad- WASHINGTON. March I5.   inurnment until tomorrow. It had been scheduled to conclude today. Some of the army's latest field rocket new motors and si-lf- artiller demonstrated at________ O'icla.. field artillery school March 13-26. This was announced today by Ger.e.-al Jacob L. Dcvers, com- -r.ar.dir.e general of the army rc'j o Other resolutions adopted call- lotnrs and self-   two countries. Two Notes Still Unanswered We'll Fighfr Says Iranian, to Keep National Security TEHRAN. March Ahmed Sepehbod Amir Ahmedi, minister of war, today the Iranian army was 'ready to fight to the last man" if Russian troops move toward Tehran from Karaj, 20 miles lorthwest of here, where he said rainloads of troops and ammuni- tion are arriving nightly. "Iran has shown to the world it s a peaceful nation, but if Rus- sia commits an overt act, now >nly every soldier but every hoy and girl In tho streets will' fight o defend their the gen- crnl said in an interview im- mediately following nn audience vith Mohammed Rczn Pahlavi, Shah of Iran. The Shah, ho said, plans to present the Iranian question again to tlir- United Nations se- curity council, which will meet In York City Inter this month. Ahmedi said the Russian gnrrl- ion at KnraJ had been "increased ourfold" and that there was 'three times as many Russians in Azerbaijan as a month ago. He termed the reported con- of troops and equip- ment a "definite threat to Teh- ran" and added that all necessary precautions were being taken to meet it. "The general said that Iranians .vould not "go out to meet the Russians or even erect fortifica- tions outside the- city." "Iran's intentions are only peaceful, but our national sectiri- y is at he added. "Tehran A'ill be defended to the last mnn boys and girls will f this extreme and unlikely measure becomes necessary. Lindy Goodwin Is Questioned About Robberies Being Jchwabe Is Urging Resolution Passage Says Making Last Dec. 7 War-End Would Smash Some Production Blocks WASHINGTON. March congress approves his res- olution declaring the war ended last Dec. 7 it smash some reconversion bottlenecks, Rep. George Schwabc (R.-Okla.) said today. He chose the Dec. 7 date, he said, because it was the anniver- sary of Pearl Harbor. "If the house and senate pass- ed this concurrent resolution, which requires no signature from the president, it would end the emergency period and would terminate within a few weeks a lot of bureaus created during Schwabe told a re- porter. "It is one way of getting rid of a lot of surplus wartime em- ployes now on the federal pay- roll. In my opinion it would do more to stimulate reconversion and bring us back to economic normalcy than anything that could be done by congress." He added that passage of the resolution by congress would break many bottlenecks that have been impeding production and would "strip the executive branch of government of a lot of i'.s war powers." "In peace ho said, "we cannot continue to exist under wirtime orders and edicts and regain our economic equlli- bruim." Llndy (Rabbit) Goodwin, who was arrested Thursday morning at Eufaula on a warrant issued at Mena, Ark., was returned to Ada Thursday afternoon by Chief of Police Dud Lester, who want- ed to question him on some in- cidents in Ada. Hc admitted entering a bus- iness firm at Antlers last Octo- ber and taking a check protec- tor, in addition to several other items, but he made no comment as to whether or not he took in change tint was missing at the same time. Chief Lester tried to connect him with several robberies in Ada, but Goodwin denied having anything to do with the case of which the police chief question- ed. Goodwin told Chief Lester that he didn't want to return to Ark- ansas to face burglary charges there. Mena authorities allege that Goodwin took several cases of whiskey from a whiskey store, transported them to Oklahoma where he disposed of the stolen property. Antlers authorities arc expect- ed in Ada to further question Goodwin about other robberies at Antlers. The check protector that Good- win admits taking from the Ant- lers firm was the one used by bogus check writers that were caught in Ada a couple of moths ago after they were identified at Norman. Restaurants Found Breaking Ceilings Eleven Eating places In Four County Area Reported In Violations Eleven restaurants have been found in violation of OPA price ceilings in Scminole No. 3, Coal, Murray and Pontotoc counties, according to members of the loc- al price board. Three restaurant operators and one auto repair man placed their cases before the local bo'ard this week. Three of the four paid fines of each and settled their cases while the fourth was plac- ed on probation. Only three of the 11 res- taurants found in violatioti dur- ing a recent survey have made settlement with the local board. Read the Ada News Want Ads. Novikov. after a three-minute conversation with Byrnes, told reporters only that he had deliv- ered nn answer to a note from the United States government There were three U. S. notes awaiting Soviet replies prior the Novikov visit. Two concern- ed Soviet actions in Iran nnd the third protested the reported Rus- sian withdrawal of Japanese in- dustrial equipment from Man- churia. This development on the diplo- matic front came in the wake of President T r u m a n' a comment yesterday that he docs not con- sider the current international situation as fraught with danger as many people believe. "I'm not alarmed by it." he de- clared, giving his permission for direct quotation. "I'm sure we'll work out of it." Hume SHU Apprehensive The chief executive's hopeful- ness was echoed by two import- ant figures on capital hill, al- though diplomatic officials re- mained apprehensive over ulti- mat Soviet intentions in the Iran area. Senate Majority Leader Bark- ley (Ky) commented "It has been my opinion all along that the situation isn't as bad as the head- lines would seem to indicate." And Senator Popper (D-Fla) told reporters. "I think entirely too much emphasis has been laid on the bad side of the Interna- tional situation. I think people who do so arc rendering a public disservice. "There is no more reason for Russia and the United States to go to war than there would for Florida to declare war on Georgia." --------------------K------------------- On-Job Vets (an Get Sets of Tools VA Ready to Approve Up To for Those In Cer- tain Types of Training Here's ne-ws for cx-serviccmen who are busy with on-the-job training now. J. W. Walters, In charge of this program In Ada, announces that for such vets who are engaged in learning occupations In which tools are as mech- anics, can get tools now to the value of through the Veter- ans Administration. Gene Ford, VA contact rep- resentative in the postofflce building, has the forms to be us- ed in making application and al- so is prepared to advise veterans on how lo proceed with making application for needed sets of tools. WILL SELL 15G JEEPS AT FORT SILL SOON OKLAHOMA CITY. March 13. Morton of the War Assets corporation. Fort Worth, announced today that 158 jeeps will go on sale "March 23 at Fort Sill. Morton said the prices to vet- erans would be about 'to for 1941 models; to for 1942's; to for 1943's. The prices will vary with the condition of the jeep. TH' PESSIMIST Bob BUnln. Miss Fanny Frail is nearly ugly enough f be "n expert athlete. Th' feller who built a du- plex some years ago an' is livin' in one side an' off other is goin' t' town theM days.   

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