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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 14, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 14, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             For Hie average fellow it isn't a matter of deciding between making a garden or going is more restful just to sort of stick around and comfortably come to no decision at Tartly clnuilv Panhandle; consid- erable cloudiness remainder of state tonight and Friday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 282 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1916 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Lewis Makes Dramatic Indictment Accuses Cool Management Of Death of Mine Workcn, Wrecking Bodies of Others Will Suits, Shorts and Shirts For Men Be in Stores Soon? Only Answer Hope So By JAMES MARLOW WASHINGTON, March 14,   j "tLedcd about suits, shorts and machines, shirts for men? Will the stores March 1-J, Lewis stood diamati- caliv before a conference of Unit- ed Mine Workers npd soft coal oner.V.ors f-dnv and rend an "in- accusing tho industry's and stockholders of rr.akine "dead" mine work- 'xhe ITMW chieftain railed for a ftanding vote of the inein- bf.-s of the policy curn- fr.itV'o ritt'-nclinj; tho conference .-.5 to whether they to join indictment. Then? was no thssont. Lewis made hi1; charges in sup- port cj the VMW's demand for irnprovtd working conditions in the coal The demand or.e of submitted to Bitu- coal operators fit the of contract negotions two days ago. Operators Silent There? was no immediate com- rr.er.t frnrr. operators. However, thev '.vill hay the opportunity to rep'.v Inter. Lewis' statement, v.-hich he an incident, raid: "We arrive by the record, that management and Moekhold- rrs of the Bituminous coal in- dustry in a period of 14 ytars have, through mismanagement cupidity, stupidity and wanton r.ezlect, made dead mine workers. "We accuse by the record, that in the rarr.e period the same and stockholders have, for the same reasons, vio- I'-r.tlv mangled, churshed and shattered the bodies of mine workers. "We accuse by the record, that the industrv does not bury its dead nor bind up the shattered bor.es and the mangled flesh of i'.s dead nor bind up the chattered bones and the mangled flesh of its victims in any adequate, hu- :r.ane or modern renso." CharKes "Extortion" Lewis jilro accused the rnana- Cernint and stockholders of cx- "the families of the dead" i.r.d practicing "extortion upon the vet livir.c victims of its industrial Violence." "We accuse by the ho r-Jdcd. "that the industry extorts from the pay envelope r! the rr.ine workers "SGO.000.000 pscudo. hypothetical and sub- standard medical service, hospita- ].ration ar.d insurance of an ac- tual value of lesr. than one-third of '.he aforesaid SGO.000.000." He chalk need the industry to a "point by point" answer of the charges and shouted: "We demand abatement of this j'.aughter. "We demand cessation of the accompanying ex tart ion." His statement came after n morning sersion d< voted largely to the reading of affidavit.? of ac- cident victims in support of his demand for improved safety rules ar.d compensation laws. Philippine Puppet President Indicted MANILA. March 14. Joseph 1-aurel, president of the puppet Philippine republic and five members of his Japanese- rpor.rored cabin't were indict- ed on charger, of treason today. Topping a long list of others charged with collaboration as commonwealth prosecutors work- ed it top speed to complete fil- :r.e more than -5.000 cases before Monday's cJcaciline were: Jorge D. Vargas the late Phil- ippine President Manuel Que- secretary who became of t.-.e Japanosc-con- trolVd xrcutive commission and later war. puppi t to Japan. T1.1. a of Philippine president -Sergio O: sons by marriage: Nicasio and Jr. Paredes. puppet minis- ter of wmks and oommu- ami now a candidate for the first independent legislature. Ber.igno S. Aquino, speaker of the occupation assembly, and sev- eral puppet cabinet members. Laurel. Vargas and Aquino are held by allied authorities in Japan. P.ircdcs is free on bail. ANDERSON TO CALIFORNIA PONCA CITY. March T. Anderson, chairman of the department of business at the northern Oklahoma Junior college. Tonkawa. has resigned to accept an appointment as associ- ate professor of accounting at Arrr.s'.ror.R college, Berkeley, have them soon? If so, will they keep getting them? There's just one honest answer: Let's hope no. No one, inside or outside- government, can speak positively. We've heard rosy stories about those things before and were dis- appointed. We may be again. Who's to blame for the short- ages? The manufacturers? OPA? CPA (the civilian production ad- Or all three? It would take n congressional investigation to find out. Went Up, Not Down Last April OPA Doss Chester Bowles happily predicted men's clothing, generally, would drop five to six per cent in price. Instead, since then it's gone up at least five per cent. This figure is from the government's bureau of labor statistics. Take suits first. What caused the shortage in them? Here are some reasons: 1. By war's end, little weaving of men's suits was being done. 2. When the war ended, time rcconvcrting H. Army and navy men, rapid- ly discharged, needed suits. They bought what they could, put a dent in the stories' scanty sup- plies. Manufactures complained of OPA price controls, said they couldn't turn out suits at OPA prices. 5. Manufactures gave wage in- creases. Then they cried louder for better OPA prices. C. It seems apparent, govern- ment and clothing industry men say, that manufacturers hoarded some suits, keeping them for bet- ter OPA prices. What's The Remedy? What's the remedy? OPA eased up on prices last weekend, says this generally won't mean higher prices, just higher prices in some low- er in others. Meanwhile the government (CPA) turned over to the suit- makers enough cloth for medium-priced suits in the first three months of 1946. What's the result going to be? (Continued on Page 3, Column 0) Reserve Champ Barrow Here Is Grand Champ at Tulsa Show Jim Choddick, Wewoka FFA, Takes Top Honors; Others Place; Grand Champ Barrow Here Competing at Ardmore Jim Chadick, Wewoka FFA member who showed a Du- roc barrow that was reserve grand champion at the livestock show here earlier this week, put his best foot forward Wed- nesday to show the grand champion barrow at the "Magic Empire Livestock show nt Tulsa. Some of the animals exhibited at tho Ada show are being added to the winning list at Tulsa with Lynn Harber. Scminole FPA, winning the light class with his Poland China barrow. Men who know hogs predicted that harrows exhibited here would be among the best in the state and they were not wrong in that prediction. It might be interesting to note Agreement Ends Strike Of GE Workers Involves Union Members in 16 States; 18 J Cent Boost Is Basis NEW YORK, March A wage boost of IB'.i cents nn hour formed the basis today of n u n i o n-managcment agreement settling the strike of CIO United Electrical Workers Union members in General Electric plants in 16 states. Formal ending of the walkout, which began Jnn. 15 and which has held up production of a large part of the nation's supply of in- dustrial and home electric appli- ances, hinged upon ratification of the pact by the union member- ship. Union leaders expressed the hope last night that this process would be completed in time to permit resumption of work Mon- day. But lenders of locals in Bridgeport, Conn., and Bloom- field, N. J., said that picketing of GE plants in those cities would continue until the agreement had been ratified. The wage increase will not be- come effective until it has been approved by the National Wage Stabilization Board, according to Albert J. Fitzgerald, US presi- dent, and E. D. Spiccr, company vice-president. General Electric and the union agreed there would be no dis- crimination against any employe. The wage increase, the joint statement said, will be for "all employes represented by but later it was said a similar in- crease would be given employes represented by other bargaining units. Several small AFL and in- lepcndcnt unions have organiza- .ions among General Electric em- ployes. U. Si Learns Three Russian Forces Are Moving In Iran J. E. Williams, Ada Business Man Since 1921, Is Dead J. E. Williams, came to Ada from Shawnce in 1921 to be- come manager of the then newly organized Retail Merchants As- sociation and remained at its head until he retired Dec. 1. 1944, died at a local hospital Wednesday about p.m. Funeral services will be held Thursday at 2 p.m. from the First Christian church, Dr. A. Lin- scheid officiating, assisted by Rev. James O. Michael; burial will be at Shawnce. Fairview cemetery, Mr. Williams was born in 1867 in Kentucky. He moved to Shaw- nee in November of 1902 and op- erated a grocery business. At the time he decided to come to Ada lie was, in addition to being a grocer, secretary 'or the Shaw- nce Hetail Merchants Association. After selling the business here late in 1944 he retired from ac- tive business life but continued ar. he had been for many years a faithful member of the First Christian church. He is survived by Mrs. Will- iams and a daughter. Miss Golden Williams. South Francis; a sister, Mrs. Emma Fulkerson of Kentucky. Winters and Bebee Are Free on Bond Charges of Assault And Battery With Dangerous Weapon Followed Highway Incident that the grand champion barrow of the Ada show did not go to Tulsa, but was taken to a district show at Ardmore where judging was scheduled to begin Thursday morning. Bill Brown. Seminole FFA, showed a second place Poland China barrow at Tulsa, but didn't even get in the money here. Most of the barrows that plac- ed high here also placed high at Tulsa and local hog raisers say that so as" the barrows stood in Ada so will they stand at other shows in the state. IWEATHER! cloudy Pan- J.jr.Jl': cloudiness remainder of state tonight and hut no rain likely; con- tinued mild tonight and east Fri- day: lowest tonight 40 Panhandle; 50-55 remainder of state; colder west Friday afternoon. Oneal Winters and Floyd Heboe I made boiidn Wednesday and wore I released from county jail after i being charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weap- on. James W. Dillard, a third member, is still in county jail as he did not make bond. for Winters and Bebce amounted to S500 each; they were connected with an incident that occurred early Sunday morning near Stonewall. In addition to being charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, Dillard is also charged with assault with intent to kill. The bond for the first charge was S500 while the second amounted to The date for the three prelim- inary hearings was set for 2 p.m. next Wednesday. Dillard is still in county jail. Enochs Charged In Possession Case Frank Enochs, charged with il- possession of tax paid whiskey, bound over to dis- trict court Thursday morning af- ter ho entered a plea of not guilty in the' Franklin Bourland justice of the peace court. County Attorney Vol Crawford said that tho case should appear in the next term of district court. Enochs was released when he made bond. Cars Collide Near Ada in Heavy Fog Autos Damaged; Two Traf- fic Arrests Made on High- ways Near City Jessie Wilmoth, driving a 1939 Pontiac coupe, and R. I. Pruitt, driving a Chevrolet coach, both of Pauls Valley were involv- ed in an accident early Thursday morning about six miles west on Highway 19. Highway Patrolman Cy Killian I investigated the accident, in rthich about damage were done to each of the cars. Patrolman Killian said that the cars met in almost a headon col- lision. The accident occured dur- ing a heavy fog. Two traffic arrests were made Wednesday and Wednesday night by Trooper Killian. Raymond Milligan paid a fine and costs after entering a pica of guilty to driving a car with improper lights. He was arrested on State Highway 12. George Tiner was arrested north of Ada and charged with violation of the rules of the road. Both of were filed the in strong justice court. traffic incidents the Percy Arm- Friday Is Deadline For Making Those Income Tax Returns On the calendar tomorrow will be Friday, March 15. For quite a number of people it will be "Deadline." Or maybe it should be "Dead- lines." It's the final date for filing income tax with payments if the taxpayer owes federal and state revenue inspection. It's also the final date on which residents of Pontotoc county can apply for homestead tax exemp- tion and also file intangible and personal property assessments. A penalty of 10 per cent goes on the last two automatically if the taxpayer is delinquent about it. The U. S. internal revenue of- fice on the top floor of the post- office building is a busy place now. Each year it handles from 000 to federal income tax returns. Last week and this week three men arc working to help the "returners" and they ex- pect to remain in the office and available into early Friday night. The deadline for filing those fed- eral income tax returns is mid- night of Friday. MARSHALL SCARES OFF ROBBKR LEROY. Has., March 14. George French engaged in a gun battle early today with a man who, the officer reported, apparently was trying to break into the First National bank of LeRoy institution held up a week ago. The man made his escape in an automobile, French said, adding that he believed he wounded him in tho leg. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads S.H.I 3 Work Tied Up In PRA Refusal Among 13 Projects Held Up on Grounds Contrac- tors' Prices Too High By C3KNE POTKS OKLAHOMA CITY. March 14, state highway commis- sion was in the dark today as to its future steps in carrying out the big 1946 road construction program, pending the next move by the federal public roads ad- ministration in fixing a cost ceil- ing on construction. The PRA has refused to con- cur in 13 Oklahoma projects, in- volving expenditure of about on grounds the contrac- tors' price were loo high in com- parison with 1040 construction rates. The contracts in question were granted by the commission fol- lowing receipt of bids Feb. 12 but were subject to PRA appro- val, since federal money was in- volved. All-State Jobs Go Ahead (Contracts on numerous pro- jects financed completely by state money, included in let- ting, have been lit and work will go ahead, since the PRA has no interest In them, Commission Vice-Chairman J. Dewey Cle- mens said. As to the future of the 194G federal-state road program, Cle- mens said, "we're just feeling out the situation now. trying to find some kind of guide to go by. We are liable to meet the same dif- ficulty in the future as now, un- less something is worked out." Construction Costs Involved The PRA, he said, is trying to work out a system of ceilings on construction. The administration order-with- hold temporarily concurrence on projects on which construction costs were much as 35 per cent higher than in pre-war days. Clemens said the next big state road letting is scheduled tenta- tively for April 23, but it is not possible to say yet how the PRA action will affect that letting. Most of the projects are on the list are farm-to-market roads and while they involve much federal money, there is no 1940 basis for comparison, he pointed out. The federal farm-to-market program was not underway in 1940. The 30-day period since bids were received on the questioned projects expires today. May Yet Grant Contracts Under the law, contracts must be let within 30 days after re- ceipt of bids, but Clements said that since the PRA action is be- yond tho control of the commis- sion, the state board may not yet be barred from granting the con- tracts if ultumate PRA approval is received. The PRA order was not confin- ed to the Oklahoma program a- lone, but was a nation-wide ac- tion in an effort to hold down construction Clements said. Costs reports in Texas, Louisi- ana and Arkansas were similar to those in Oklahoma, he added. Oklahoma contracts held up as a result of the action include: Pontotoc H. 13, 0.5 Goering Testifies in Nuernberg grading and drainage of Ada, Stone, Long miles of northwest and Falls, S. II. 13, 0.5 miles of grading, drain- age northwest of Ada, Stone, Long and Falls, S. H. 13 (Continued on Pago 2 Column fl) Campus Couple Met in Algiers, Both Have Praise for Red Cross Hermann Wilhclm Goering, former Chief Marshal of the Nazi Reich and No. 2 man to Hitler, tells of pact with Hitler which he made in the early 1920's. Goering is on trial, with other high ranking Nazis in Nuernberg, Goering Sent Young Airmen To Spain to Gel War Experience Claims All Credit for Luftwaffe, Assumes Responsibility For Anti-Jewish Decrees, Defends Blind Obedience Knife Wielding Leads lo Charges Woman Accused of As- sault With Intent to Kill Charges of assault with intent to kill were filed against Hazel Wilson, a negro, in the Franklin Bourland justice court by Vol Crawford, county attorney, Thurs- day morning. The woman is alleged to have made an assault on O. D. Clark, another negro, with a pocket knife. Officials said that she used a large pocket knife to cut Clark about the neck and throat. She entered u plea of not guilty in court Thursday morning, and March 21 at 10 a.m. was set as the time for the preliminary hearing. Her bond was set at which she had not made late Thursday morning. There is a couple on the East Central campus whose romance reads like a fantasy. Theirs was a "military" love affair culmina- ting in an international marriage in Algiers. Mr. and Mrs. Pete Richeson, both civilians again, have return- ed to college. Both expressed appreciation for the "swell job" done by the Red Cross overseas. The girl in the story was a WAC in 1343, a native of Pen- nsylvania, doing stenographic work in a headquarters company in Algeries. The suitor was a master sergeant in the Army's Psychological Warfare branch, working in a shortwave radio station in Algiers. They met in June of 1943. In April. they were married. Marriage Well Certified The couple was married twice, once in a French civil ceremony (Algiers is a French North Afri- can and once in an American military ceremony. They received five certificates of marriage, but as yet, none is recorded in this country. Pete Richeson was later com- missioned in Italy. He said of. the Red Cross: "The Red Cross was very active where- ever the Army went. In Algiers the Red Cross established a big club which served ice cream, cof- fee, ?iot chocolate. Soldiers had access to the reading room, filled with newspapers, periodical, and magazines. Showers and beds were available at any time for us. Also the Red Cross was active in conducting interest." tours of educational Mrs. Richeson commended the organization: "The Red Cross did a swell job for the men and overseas. In Algiers, North Af- By NOLAND NORGAARD NUERNBERG, March Goering testi- fied before the international military tribunal today that he aslced Adolf Hitler to send help to Generalissimo Francisco Franco during the Spanish civil war "to prevent the spread of communism and to try our young air force experimental; ly." "At that said Goering of nazi intervention in Spain, "I had an opportunity to see if we had Hie proper equipment, and I saw to it that the personnel got some experience. "Young men continually went and returned." Ho said Franco asked for aid, "particularly air aid." Goering, resuming direct testi- mony in his own be-half, boasted that his Luftwaffe was responsi- ble for tin- swift conquest of Po- land, "just us tho American air- force assured the allied victory." Couldn't Get I.nng-Kancc Itombers Ho confirmed that he ordered tho nazi aircraft industry to de- velop a bomber capable of flying to the United States and back, insisting that they do this work "cxpeditiously in case America rica. the American Red Cross sponsored an Allied Service' Woman's club building for the service women and their guests, the various rooms containing piano, radio, magazines, games, cards and a snack bar where you could get hot 
                            

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