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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 11, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 11, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Mexico, Mo., 1 M.xico Evening tod.y .n .diteriql "Th. C.mpl... Hi.fory of M.n." The .ntire t.xt c.n.i.t. J of thr.. 'Adam Atom' Fair and warmrr this afternoon: increasing cloiidinrss tonight and Tuesday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 270 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, MARCH 11, 1'MO Select Stock Show Champs Today FIVE CENTS THE COPY Barrows Have Ever Called Best That Been Entered Here General Average of Steers, Lambs Higher Than in Past Eight Years Burglars Hit Hard in Night Nan's Market Robbed Of Estimated Gold Token from Dental Office Burglars took everything but n hnlitiay Saturday night a.i three brrak-ins v.-rn- leported to city police Sundav Market was the hardest hit with r.n estimated of rcport- rd to have been taken from n safe that was knocked open. Dr. Donald Granger reported that dental office was enter- ed Saturday right and worth of ntal coating gold was taken frorn his office. Tho Granger office v.-ar, en- trrtd after a v.-irHnw was broken out of a door. The incident oc- rurcd .Saturday and t h war, reported Dr. Ed Granger, who found the door open Sunday morning. Many Visit Fairgrounds, See Fine Animals Being Exhibited In Pictures Paris 01 Sunday There; Judging Monday Pauls Valley Lad Exhibits Grand Champion Barrow Market Entered The Green Sprav market was rr.K-rrd Saturday night, b u t nothing was icpnrtcd missing. T.-.M management did report that valuable were scattered about the tore. Burglars tried to enter Ivan's frr.rn a back rnti-nntv. but found door barred well and en- trance with the cquip- were using. A.'.cr to gain entrance by way of a back door they went to the front door and pried open. The was left oy y of n back entrance. In to money and checks. was reported miss- :r.c. Ivan Branscome. manager of h.-.s asked all person.-; who cave checks at his market last ir.ursday. Frijlav or Saturday to get in. touch v.-i-.h him. Kept Gun Handy Police said thnt tho man or took a shotgun from its Di.-ice in the meat market, load- ed it and carried jt with them ur.til they left tin- store. The Run found at the back door. Dud I." ter. cliief of Police, and H-.v Heave--. Kri.-cd special the burglary n. Ivans and report that n Vic- tor safe u-ar knocked open by an experienced hand as even-thing cone had the earmarks of n pro- 'c-ssior.al. Part of the lors ni Ivan's was covered by insurance. A Chester White b.irrow own- ed by Bob Rennie. FFA member from Pauls Valley, walked off with grand champion barrow honors Monday morning; W. R. Folton. supervisor of vocational education in the Southwestern District of Oklahoma nnd judge of all barrow.-, said that the bar- rows at the Ninth Annual South- lenstern Oklahoma Junior Live- stock Show were among the best that he had ever judged. Judge Feltoi. said that the grand champion and reserve grand champion barrows were the best ever shown at the Ada show and tho show as a whole was among the best in Oklahoma. Ralph Iiughcs, Wewoka FFA member, exhibited a Duroc-Jor- barrow that was named re- serve grand champion of the bar- row show. Winners ir. each class received prizes in the following manner, first second third fourth nnd the remainder of j the winners received two dollars each. I Following is a list of winners in various classes of the barrow division: Light Weight Poland China I Jack Sevcdflc, Lindsay 4-H. first and second; Jack Jarman of lishomingo FFA third; Bobby Garrison, Stratford FFA, fourth; Lcland Ilaswcll, Moore FFA fifth. Middle Weight Poland China Jnck Hall, Prague FFA, first; George Bliney, Davenport FFA, second; Willey Pevehouse. Dav- .cnport FFA, third: Billy Vande- ver, Lexington FFA, fourth; Car- rol Clarkson. Davenport FFA, fifth: Gene Selman, Garvin coun- ty 4-H, sixth: Junior Nelson, We- Icetk.-i FFA, seventh. Heavy Poland China Carrol Clarkson, Davenport jl-fA. first; Paul Cunningham, damn county 4-H, second; Car- rol Clarkson, Davenport FFA third; Louis Abncy, Stratford UPPER LEFT: A group of 4-H club and FFA boys sitting in the sun in front of oni: of the build- ings nt the Fairground before noon Sunday. Included in the Croup sitting in a small circle is Bill Cooper, FFA leader at Sem- inole. CENTER: Jerry Moidell. Pra- gue FFA, is shown grooming his steer for the parade Sunday af- ternoon. He is showing n steer that is owned by his brother Clif- ford, who entered the service re- cently. The Hereford steer was named grand champion recently at n show in Prague. UPPER RIGHT: Ralph Thomp- son, Hughes county 4-H club member, is shown with his ex- hibit for tho Ada show. He was the owner of a Southdown lamb that won grand champion honors here last year. LOWER LEFT: George Smith. Pontotoc county 4-H boy. is shown with his steer 'Big D', with which he hoped to win his class. He is tho son of Jack Smith, man- ager of the Lazy D Ranch, and is always a strong contender. LOWER RIGHT: "Joe Louis" is nn Angus steer that is owned by Bobby Cooper of Mead in Bryan county. The steer was grand champion "nt Durant last week. Judging of the hundreds of fine animals in the ninth annual Southeastern Livestock Show took over the attention of farm and judges Sunday was the big visitors. renter returns tor amount in- News Classified Ads JWEATHER! FFA. fourth. Jack Sevedge's light Dairy Talkr Show Awards Scheduled At Meeting Tonight There'll be dairy talk and beef cattle talk at a Kiwanis-sponsor- ed meeting tonight at the Ald- ndqe hotel, beginning at o clock. All persons in the county who are interested in dairy cattle arc invited to the meeting. Glen Householder, extension director of the HolsU'in-Fricsian Association of America, will speak on selection, breeding and feeding of dairy cattle. Raymond Appleman. fieldman of the Hol- stoin association in tho southwest, nafn, Okl which ends Tuesday will send on to Tulsa and Oklahoma City state shows some entries that will have to be reckoned with in the judging at those bigger contests. Steer and lamb judging were under way Monday afternoon. Sunday morning many visitors drove to the fairgrounds and watched the 4-H and FFA Inds taking caro of their prize stock. During tho afternoon several hundred visitors strolled through the barns to inspect the fine steers, barrows and lambs and most of them were in the con- crete stands when the steers were paraded, then assembled for tak- ing of pictures. Even to the untrained watch- ers it was evident that tho gen- eral average of Quality of the steers was higher than usual nnd hat some of the animals are real- ly magnificicnt examples of ex- cellent breeding nnd feeding. The winning exhibitors of to- day s competition will be guests at tonight's Kiwnnis program to receive their medals. Would Revoke Beer License County Attorney Asks Revocation of License Of Roy Clark, for North Pole An application for revocation of beer license granted to Uoy Clark for operation of the North Pole, located about a mile north of the city limits, was filed Mon- day morning by County Attorney Vol Crawford. The information filed stated that since February 1940, the North Pole has been operating as n beer tavern wherein they sell 3.2 per cent beer. Tho county at- torney lias been informed and alleges that ness is not PURCELL LEADER DIES PURCELL. Okla., Maish 11.   J. Thiel. 78. prominent in county democratic poli- tics, died Sunday of a heart at- tack. He had been in ill health since last December. Oitl.-ihoma Fair and warmer afternoon; increasing cloud- iness tonight nnd Tuesday, fol- Jcnvcci by scatteri-d showers at r.ieht iv.-irrr.cr nnd south nt lowest tempernturrs -15-50 v.r-t. slightlv cooler TurH.-iy nlternoon; through Tuesday. weight was named cham'nion Poland China barrow. Light Weight Duroc Ralph Iiughcs, Wcwoka FFA, first; Kenneth Stephens. Dale ttA. second; Roy Paspisil, Pra- gue FFA. third: Joe Maxie. Sem- at tlie Southeastern inolo FFA, fourth: Richard Fin-'Junlor Livestock Show in pro- kie. Excelsior 4-H, fifth: l'prc will be awarded med- Kelly, Garvin county 4-H, sixth; nls for their winnings. WUter Pantlik, Prague FFA seventh. Middleweight Duroc R. E. Wallace. Wcwoka FFA, first: Joe Baker, Lindsay 4-H, second; Kenneth Townsend, Stratford FFA, third; Leon Dobbs. Scr.iinolc FFA, fourth- Ross English. Gnrvin county 4-H, fifth. Ervin Pruitt. Pauls Valley FFA. sixth; Oram Carter, Pra- (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) will speak, as will Lloyd Stin- nett, A. M. extension service dairyman. Stillwater. For the beef, barrow and amb group, grand champion ex- hibitors at the Southeastern A luncheon will be served through the courtesy of the Ki- wanis club. -------------X------------ A California woman tried to crash from the end to the front of n stocking sale line-up. She OllU got some they weren't nylons. -K- Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ada the place of busi- being operated by Roy Clark, but that divers other persons have been operating It. Causes Highway Hazard It was stated in the applica- tion for revocation that the place is going operated and conducted in such a manner as to render the State Highway leading from the city limits of Ada. north to Konawa a traffic hazard to the traveling public. According to the records, var- ious persons have been arrested on the promises owned nnd oper- ated by Clark nnd those intoxi- cated persons have either pleaded guilty or been convicted in justice of the peace court in Ada for be- ing in a drunken condition. Intoxicated Persons Some persons have been seen coming out of the North Polo and on the premises in nn intoxicated condition .md carrying beer on their persons at tho time they were arrested, continues the ap- plication. It was written into the appli- cation that the North Polo is a place where people congregate and loiter around in an intoxi- Plan Fight For Subsidy In Housing Administration Also Rush- ing New Order to Divert Building Into Homes By MARVIN ARHOWSMITII WASHINGTON. March II.   Barkley (D-Ky.) said tmlay the administration will tight to restore in subsidies when housing legisla- tion is considered by the senate. Barkley talked with reporters at the White House after conces- sional leaders conferred with President Truman. The house re- Icctrd suhsidlc.1 on building ma- terials and another key fonturu of the president's housing pro- prices on o 1 d dwellings. The government was busy al- so rushing final touches on a new order -designed to slash com- mercial and industrial construc- ion so that more homes can be built. Will Center On Subsidies Barkley made clear that ad- ministration forces would attempt o revive all features of the ori- linal housing bill nskocl by Mr. Truman, but he said the major effort would be behind the sub- idv payments. With the Kentuckian nt the White House were Speaker Ray- )Urn, house democratic leader rtcCormnck (Mass.) and Senator McKcIlar president TO tcmpore of the senate. The government's order on ommercial type building was escribed by officials who have ecn n preliminary draft as drastic and far-reaching." It is scheduled for announcement soon. These officials, who asked that their names not be published, said the order will hold up con- struction of thousands or non- essential stores, office buildings and factoricj still in the blue- print stage. But they predicted it will hit hardest at proposed roadhouscs, night clubs, theaters nnd other amusement projects. These will not be banned entirely, but builders will have to show there- is n community need for such recreational fncilities. The new order is being drawn up by the civilian production ad- ministration and the National Housing Agency. They figure it will channel well over two- thirds of all building materials to residential construction. "There's no said one official, "with the goal new homes during the next two years." There has been no decision yet whether f> halt work on some rated condition. The plaintiff is asking that (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) JIDIllU commercial and industrial proj- ects already underway. CPA reportedly is opposing such a step because of the diffi- culty of vhere to draw the line. The agency also is mnking the point that it lacks an adequate staff to enforce a slop-construc- tion order of that kind. Series of Petty Robberies Here Weekend Brings Reports Of Bikes, Battery, Tools Stolen During Nights A series of petty burglaries took place Saturday and Sunday nights with a number of items being reported missing. E. H. Moore, 300 East Ninth, reported that a battery, size sev- en, was stolen from his truck some time between Saturday night and Monday morning. Two long handled shovels, two short handled shovels, one sharp shooter, one pick, 50 feet of wat- er hose, a six pound sledge ham- mer, a three-quarter inch drill and a 12 inch level were stolen from the corner of Twelfth and Johnston where E. M. Byrd has on working. Sandra Cox and Doyle Myers :pld police Monday morning that their bicycles were stolen Sunday night. The Cox bicycles was at 21514 West Fifteenth and the Vlyers bicycle was parked in ront of the McSwain theater Churchill Fails With Fulton Talk Oldtimc Magic Didn't Swing U. S.; Consistent In Distrust of Russia By JAMES MARLOW WASHINGTON, March Churchill under- took another talk today, an ans- wcr-to-qucstions talk at a lun- cheon given by newsmen. It was to be an "off-the-rcc- ord" affair su what he said could iiol_ be printed. For that reason many were going in the hope he might say more fully what is in his mind than he'd say for print. Some were going because this might be their last chance to see the Englishman who helped pull his country through its "finest hour." May Be Last Visit Churchill is an old man now, 72. He may not be back this way again. Ho wants to see the em- pire preserved. He said he would not liquidate it. There- is great power in Churchill s language and great charm in his husky voice If he came to America hoping his oldtim? magic would swing this country into an alliance with Britain, as a block to Russia, he failed. Fulton Speech Failed His Fulton, Mo., speech, where he made the proposal, was re- ceived cooly. Some senators call- ed it "shocking." It had small approval. There is a strange similarity in Churchill's language through the years, but tt.ero are contradic- tions in his career. When the old League of Na- tions, which failed pitifully, was 10 years olu Churchill called it n "granite rock" and "palace" to which the whole world would sooner or later resort in "full trust." Now Churchill calls the lea- gue's successor, the United Na- tions, a temple" which must be built upon a "rock." Consistently Against Russia He has been consistent, how- ever, in his distrust of Russia, a distrust h? smothered over dur- ing the war jears in the common fight against Hitler. Under his inspiration after the first wor'd war, the British (Continued on 1'nge 3, Column 0) What Happens When Car Fails To Make Turn, Takes to Curb No One Injured Bur Men In Car Shaken Up And Car Damaged in Mishap Pictured at left is a 1938 Ford tudor that was traveling south on Broadway when the driver decid- ed to make n left turn onto Main street, but didn't quite make the turn as shown in the picture. The car stopped on the sidewalk with one rear wheel on the side- walk; the other wheel is shown dropped in the gutter. Right above tho car is a sign that says on Green, Right on Red." But what good is a sign when stop lights arc not operating? There was no one injured in the (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) Aflee Makes Plain Churchill Wasn't Talking for Britain LONDON. March Prime Minister Attlee told the house of commons today that Winston Churchill in his Fulton Mo., speech of March 5 had "stated very clearly he spoke for himself only." Attlee said the government was not called upon to "express any opinion." The speech was attacked by Pravda in Moscow today as ad- vocating a British-American mil- itary alliance that would spell the end of the United Nations and the (breakup of the British- American-Soviet wartime coali- tion. Asked by Laboritc Tom Dri- berg if he would instruct the British information service in the United Slates to make it clear Churchill's speech did not rep- resent British policy, Attlee re- nlied: "The British information serv- ices in the United States are well aware that the policy of the gov- ernment in the United Kingdom is only to ba found in the state- ments of his majesty's ministers." He added that "the govcrp ment had no previous knowledg of the contents of the speech. Th( British ambassador was not call ed upon to approve or disap prove the contents of the speech beforehand." When asked by W. N. Warbey laborite, if he would "make 'i clear that the government entire ly disapproved of the tone and temper of this mischevous Attlee replied the gov- ernment was not called upon to express an opinion on a speech delivered in another country by a private individual. Driberg retorted: "Surely the leader of UIL opposition (Church- ill has something more than the status of a private citizen. Won'l you cxplicitcly repudiate the dangerous doctricn contained in the Attlee did riot reply. Engineer killed In Train Pileup MELVERN. Kas., March 11. UP) cars of an castbound San- ta Fe mail and express train were derailed near here early this morning killing the engineer and injuring the fireman fatally. Division Superintendent O. D Trill said the cause of the acci- dent had not been determined. F. C. Morse of Argentine, Kas.. the engineer, was killed, and J. F. Overstate of Emporia, fireman, was injured fatally when the second section of Santa Fe num- ber eight left the tracks. Trill said. died a few minu- tes after his arrival at the Santa Fe hospital at Topeka. Trill said no passengers were aboard the derailed cars. Read the Ada News Want Ads., Britain Backs U. S. Protest On Manchuria Also Asks Quick Reply To Note About Plans For Withdrawal from Iran By SPENCER MOOSA CHUNGKING. March II. (.Pi- Chinese nationalist and com- munist reinforcements today were reported moving to Mukden where, the cintral news agency said, the rival forces were battling after sudden withdrawal of Soviet troops. Chinese nrcss dispatches saM that thn communists, heavily out- numbering nationalist troops In the city of occupied tho power plant and northen district. Other reports said the central government had proclaimed mar- tial law in the skeleton city, whoso once-great industrial plants had been picked clean by the Russians. Both Moving In The press reports declared that elements of four nationalist armies were marching to Muk- den and that communist reinfor- cements were moving in from the north. Government elements were identified as from the 13th, 52nd. 1st nnd Cth armies. The Central Daily News said the nationalist 14th division enter- ed Mukden Saturday. The suddenness of the Soviet withdrawal was blamed for t h e "serious" street-fighting in Muk- don. Dispatches said the nation- alists did not have sufficient troops to cope with the situation. They said that for the past few clays Soviet authorities in Man- churia, from Marshal Kodinn Y. Malinovsky. Soviet commander, to junior officers, had hpi-n inac- cessible to nationalist officials. Bed Withdrawal Not General The Central News agency did not interpret the withdrawal from Mukden as a general Rus- sian evacuation of Manchuria. The ngcncy declared that six trains from Mukden had unload- ed troops, tanks, artillery and automobiles nt Changchun, Man- churia capital. Yet another report said Chang- chun was full of rumors that Soviet forces intended to quit the city. No known developments supported this. In Chungking., the Manchurian situation was discussed at a meet- ing presided over by Generalis- simo Chiang Kni-Shck. It also figured largely in talks among General George C. Marshall. President Truman's envoy in China, and various Chinese lead- ers, including the No. 2 commun- ist, Gen. Chou En-Lai. Sends Heavy Livestock Entries Taking 75 Head of Ani- mals to Ft. Worth SSow STILLWATER. Okla., March 11, A. and M. col- lege enters a major livestock show of 1946 this week with 75 head of cattle, hogs and sheep in the Ft. Worth fat stock show. Included in the A. and M. entry list are seven steers of the Aber- deen-Angus. Hereford, Shorthorn breeds: 17 Berkshire. Chester White, Duroc, and Hampshira Barrows: and 50 Hampshire. Southdown, Shropshire, a n S Rambouillet breeding and fat sheep. Dean W. L. Blizzard. Hilton Bnggs, and C. O. Thompson, of the animal husbandry depart- ment, and Alex MacKenzie. col- lege shepherd; Dwight Stephens, beef cattle herdsman, and Bob Love, hog herdsman, are attend- ing. As in past years, several Okla- homa A. and M. college students accompanied the A. and M. live- stock and will help with fitting and exhibiting. They Include Hugh Robinson, Frcedon. Okla- and William Van Arsdcll. Mor- rison, Okla. A good sign of a man being tight is his loose tongue. THr 87 Bob Jr. Lcm Wheeler, whose plans 're indefinite at this time, says ho has several things in view, but nothin' in sight. Never ask n newspaper man how th" show wuz, if had t' pay f git in.   

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