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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 10, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 10, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             women eon ttanj more thon Fair and mild Sunday, Monday mostly cloiuly, cooler 'northwest. 42nd 278 FHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 194G Parade Is Today's Feature Of Junior Fat Stock Show FIVE CENTS THE COPY 1 clllb V, f ho in the Southeastern JnninV v-. r 'n Southeastern Tu, day. continues ZPT" >liS he plans and to show then at Ardmorc dis- "FT" If T79 i i ?f j j ,W years been a leading contender in a H ;iml Don Thomp" ,t IT 'f la'''" year. He is year, i and Tulsa s'hows. Youths Bring Animals in From Eleven Soulheasiern Counties Judging Monday to Decide Champions, Cash Winners Among Steers, Barrows, Lambs; Is Ninth Annual Show A slight tightening up of nerves was evident Saturday afternoon at the Fairgrounds as more and more animals were arriving to compete in the Ninth Annual Southeastern Okla- homa Junior Livestock show that got underway Saturday with entries arriving from 11 counties. The entire show will be lighted by a parade of all animals _ Bob Zenker Was There .n front of the grandstands at o'clock this afternoon. Mem- bers of the Ada Round-Up have agreed to participate in the par- which will be followed by a wolf trapping demonstration starling at 3 p.m. Each of 578 entrants will be competing for championship hon- ors and a part of the cash prizes offered winners in various classes and divisions. Winners in steer divisions will be paid first money, the largest sum giv- en winners in the show. Look Out For "Joe Louis" Bobby Cooper, 4-H club boy from Mead in Bryan county, was one of the happiest youngsters at the show Saturday afternoon as he was preparing "Joe an Angus steer weighing pounds, for the Ada show. The steer was awarded grand champion honors at Durant Wednesday afternoon. Cooper said that his steer had gained five pounds since winning Valley Show Knd.i PAULS VALLEY, Okla.. March Hcnnie Pauls Valley FFA member, showed the grand champion barrow today at the Garvin county junior fat stock show. The borrow, placing over nearly 200 entries, was a Chester White middle- weight. Jess Lam of Pauls Valley showed the grand champion steer, a Hereford from the Gus Delaney ranch at Ada. Harvey Richardson of Elmore City exhibited the grand '.hampion lamb, a South- down, and Teti Nemccek, Pauls Valley, .showed the grand champion gilt, also a Chester White. C. E. Kinney of Oklahoma A. and M. college, judged the entries. (Editors Note: Winners at Pauls Valley will be contend- ers at tho Ada show that is in progress.) But Writes Casualty Of Yamashita Burial, Tooth Marking Others Awaiting Execution Cpl. Bob Zenker, young Adan on the unit in charge'of the bur- ial of Jap General Yamashita, wrote casually of it in a recent letter to his parents, Mr. and Airs. E. J. Zenker, 509 South Town- send. Said Bob, "I'm back at that Jap cemetery in Contalubang (Luzon, Philippine We got Ya- mashita buried in here und there- are more in the death cell awaiting execution. I and my buddy go in the death cell before they execute them and finger- print and tooth chart Zenker also was recently In charge of tho body of an Ameri- can general who committed .-Sui- cide. He has been overseas about six months. Apartments For Vets To Be Erected East Central Clearing Ground for Buildings For 20 Apartments Approved By FHA Construction has not started on the federal housing project at hast Central, but preparations I began last Monday morning when sites for the buildings were in the process of being cleaned for the construction of four two-story apartments for 20 families. East Central made application for 50 apartments for as many families, but the Federal Housing Authority at Fort Worth, Tex approved only 20. Vinson Soys There's Urgency In Setting Up Sound World Economy to Head off New War lalin-Americans Receive Diplomas Forty Complete 52 Weeks Air Mechanic Training TUI.SA. Mr vc'i It rieiRh- ;n which and South leceived dip. a- weeks t.'u- fourth inter- aviation mechanic i.-i-.iate were honor student.-.. or t-.-r and arid Aliel en- cl'i. e be- ,r were l--i> I Sherlock tuej, C'.ntreas, e ..r... n Mexico; i: i...K..-, n.-i and r U- ST. w. r. 1 s a 11 c e r. In -In 'r: a Friday1.: ;.r Four Certificates Are Suspended Board Finds Owners Paid To Tcoch, Substitutes Actually Doing Work OKLAHOMA CITY. March The teachim; certificates of four Seciuoyah county teachers were .suspended until July 1 by tho r.tato board of education to- day investigation into alleged teachim; irregularities in six rural of that county. The action followed a hearing yiv.lerday in which it was ficd that the four teacher: .ind two had been paid to teach m tlie MX schools but that actu- ally substitutes taught. The sus- pended may apply for re-instatcment of their certificat- es after July 1. In addition, the board voted to adjust state.- ;iid to the districts involved on the bans of salaries which would have been paid to the_ substitutes instead of on the basis of the higher pay of the contracted teachers. Greater amount in- jw EAT HER! c-.- t. mild Sun- cl-iudy, cuol- in: cor.vrv WHIM: ON TDK.MINAI. I.FAVF OKLAHOMA CITY, March n. --An ar-my officer on terminal leave may be named county ag- ent.- Attorney General Mac Q. Williamson today advised J. W. Marshall, Stephens county attor- ney. The attorney general ruled the county agent is an employe ra- ther than an official of the slate and the inhibition against hold- ing an official position while still on terminal leave and receiving army pay does not apply. I Greater returns amount In-i 1 News Classified Ads I ic Angus division in addition to ic grand champion honors. He links that his animal will make good showing in this show he- re he takes him to the show at ulsa next week. "Little and "Blc D" George Smith. 4-H club youth ho is the son of Jack Smith, inch manager at the D. is lowing two steers. One is nam- I "Little D" and the other is Uig Smith usually presents some rong competition wherever he lows and his two fine Hereford eers in tho show this year. Hy early Saturday afternoon, contestants from Hughes county had not arrived as they showed their stock at a Hughes county show that ended Saturday at noon. 4-H and FFA Even Both 4-H club and FFA mem- bers consider the competition at the Ada show the strongest in this section of the st'ite and nei- ther farm youth organization is ahead of the other; each has shown 12 grand champions dur- ing the past eight years. Hughes county 4-H club youths usually present the strongest competition in the lamb division while Pauls Valley has been the leader in the barrow division. I he strongest contenders in trie- steer division have been present- ed by Atoka FFA members. Hoss English of Garvin coun- ty owned the grand champion barrow, a Duroc. last year and is entering tho show here again this year. Additional Pens Provided Dccause of the increase in the number of animals expected to be shown here this year, pens have been constructed under the grand- stands at the Fairgrounds to pro- vide enough room for all the ani- mals expected. Many Ada citizens were inter- ested enough in the annual event that they went to the Fairgrounds .Saturday afternoon to take a good look at the animals before they are judged. It was estimated that more than 100 persons view- ed the animals as they were un- Inaded. All animals will bo judged Monday; the main event for I uesday is team and individual nidging contests for both 4-H ami 1-rA members. The show offi- cially ends at noon Tuesday. Kerr To Speak In N. C. OKLAHOMA CITY, March 9. Robert S. Kerr will speak at the Jackson Day Demo- MMchd23.nCr RalcciBh' N' C- Rcad the Ada News Want Ads. Next Friday Whole Set of Deadlines For Taxpayers Next Friday Is March 15. It is also two or three dead- lines, which will affect a lot of Pontotoc countians. For one thing, it is the dead- line for getting your federal and state income tax returns on their way, accompanied, if you haven't paid in enough by withholding tax, by a check for the appro- priate amount and, if your with- holding tax payments are more than is required because of de- ductions, by request for refund of the differences. March 15 is also the deadline for making application for home- stead tax exemption and for a valuation for tax purposes of your personal and intangible pro- >erty at the county tax assessor's office. Failure on the tax exemption and the property owner liv- ng on his property will pay quite lome additional ad volorem axes. Failure to assess personal and ntangible property means auto- matic addition of H) per cent as a Jenalty, reminds Assessor Char- ?y Rushing. [live Murray To Return to School July 1 Goes Bock to Presi- dency of Murray College At Tishomingo OKLAHOMA CITY, March Oklahoman says Col. Clive Murray will resign as state director of selective service to re- turn to the position of president of Murray State School of Agri- culture at Tishomingo July 1. _ A. D. Patton has served as act- president of the college while Murray has been on leave as di- rector of selective service. Murray declined to comment but The Oklahoman says it is understood he informed tin- board of regents of agricultural colleges he was ready to return to the college. Enough for Families The apartments will bo large enough for families to live com- fortably and will be desirable twins quarters for they will be semi-permanent construction. College authorities agree that :he new housing project will jrcatly alleviate the critica lousing shortage that is evidcn at the college now. Frame Construction The two-story'apat-tment hous- es will be of frame construction wo of the buildings will consis of eight apartments, each will two bedrooms, living room, kitch- en and bath. They will also have lour apartments, each with three bed rooms, living room kitchen anil bath. Erection of two of -the apart- ment houses will be between the president's residence and Knight Hall. An old garage located just behind the residence of the pres- ident will be down to make room for the new buildings. Jho other two houses will he built east of Science Hall on the hillside.- or between the eollci'e campus itself and the football stadium. No New Major Strikes Close Ahead as This Week Begins Number of Strike-Idle Drops to With More Settlements; Lewis, Operators Open Talks Tuesday May HP Rraily For Slimmer According to authorities at Kast Central, the apartments are be- ing built for veterans as a recon- version housing project. They will probably be occupied by veterans with families and will be for those attending college It is the hope of college offiic- als that the; apartments will be ready for occupancy before the ummer term begins. Five Witnesses In Case Are Missing Liquor Conspiracy Trial At Tulsa Is Delayed TULSA, Okla.. March Five missing witnesses were sought by busy government at- torneys today while other prin- cipals in the federal liquor con- spiracy trial of a sheriff and 15 other defendants marked time in a week-end recess. U. S. District Attorney Whit said he hoped to have the witnesses ready for resumption of court Monday. Meanwhile attractive Mrs. Ma- rie Davis. Joplin. Mo., who was sentenced yesterday to five years imprisonment for contempt in re- fusal to testify, has five days in which to seek a new trial, her at- torney, Luther Lane, said. She has not suggested such a move- Lane added. Legal observers expressed be- lief that any action by Mrs. Da- vis toward new trial would be tantamount to agreement to tes- tify in the case of Washington County Sheriff Tom Sears and the others. Hy The Allnclatrd Prrn The nation's reconversion pic- ture assumed the brightest hue since mid-January today (gun- day) as a new week opened with no new major strikes threatened lor tho immediate future and the number of strike idle continu- ing a steady decline. Settlement of a four months old machinists strike in San Francis- co and a 65 day old strike of Wes- tern Electric company employes in New York and New Jersey dropped the number of strike idle in the nation to than half the peak of nearly in late January. Major disputes still unsettled are the 110-day-old strike of i 000 General Motors production workers: the seven weeks old strike of CIO Electrical Workers: a strike of Unit- ed Mine Workers threatened for April 1 and a walkout of 300 Trainmen and Locomotive Engineers which was postponce for to CO days last Friday pending an investigation by a fact-finding board. GUI, HAW Confer Briefly Relative quiet prevailed on the labor front, meanwhile, with these developments: General Motors representatives held a .short negotiating session r Addresses Heads Of International Monetary Bank Inaugural Meeting of Two International Fiscal Bodies Begins at Savannah (Continued on Page 4 Column 4) City Campaign Into Its Final Lap as Filing Period Ended (V Forks were in use in Italy long before Englishmen adopted'them. Even after some were taken to Kngland. no years passed before they came into general use. U. S. Capitol dome weighs auto troubles weigh on your mind, see Sinnett- Meaders. IMO-It Insignia, Boots Taken When 168 Paratroopers Balk By EmVARIl E. IIOMAK WASHINGTON. March wing insignia and boots wen- .summarily stripped from Hilt parachute troopers who re- used to jump from planes in a raining exercise at Fort Bragg, N. C.. last month, it was dis- closed today. Tho men were .ransferred to other army units. Reports to the war department aid the jump was staged as cheduled however, on Feb. Ill, vith the Mexican secretary of var a spectator. Some 700 para- hutist.s took part. Army officials who told about the incident in response to in- quiries said no further disciplin- ary action is planned, although m wartime refusal to jump call- ed for court martial. There was no formal announcement. Ordered IJy Gavin The stripping of wings and loss of extra pay was ordered by Maj. Gen. James M. Gavin, who led members of his 82nd airborne division in a Fifth Avenue pa- rade in New York upon their re- turn from fighting in Kurope. I he men involved were vet- erans of numerous jumps, though not in combat. All wen- members of the 515th parachute regiment, a part of the KHh air- borne division. The division re- turned in August from Kurope where only the 517th regiment saw fighting. As the division was about to be broken up Gavin commanded its remnants along with other units at Fort Bragg Some Near Discharge Approximately K10 of those who refused to jump were said in the reports to have had almost enough points to assure early re- lease from service. Some had not jumped since last summer, but had continued drawing the exti-i parachute pay which the' army gives as compensation for hazar- dous a month for en- listed men. Gavin reported last month's exercise was directed by the war department as a training meas- ure in accord with the parachu- tists contention "the best way to hurt oneself and kill those in'the unit is not to jump and train regularly." Registration for Primary Vote of March 19 Also Ends for Voters Hero The hats are in the ring, the chips are down and from now until the votes are counted Tues- day night. March 111, the cam- paign fur places on Ihe Ada city commission is on full force. The filing period for the city election ended Saturday. The candidates have already been hard at it for a couple o'f weeks, endeavoring tu linu up votes. A run-off election follows In early April unless one man In each of the three commissioner races wins more than half of the voles east in his race. Registration for the city pri- mary a Inn ended Saturday. Also involved in the campaign a drive tu win favorable con- sideration for a proposal :'or board of freeholders. This is backed by citizens win are convinced that the presen city charter has some provision making it impossible to managi the city's affairs efficiently und er today's conditions ami wan to get a board of freeholder.-! ap proved, then elected to study tin old charter with a view to a mendment and revision. Campaign heat is building up steadily now and some of the forecasters are aleacly getting on on a limb with predictions of the heaviest vote in several years. Offers Reward For Info on Shooting Someone Fired at Busses In West Virginia Read the Ada News Want Ads. President Working Aboard His Yachl WASHINGTON, March Truman worked in seclusion tonight aboard the pres- idential yacht Williamsburi' at anchor at Washington's naval gun factory. Press Secretary Charles G. Ross told reporters the chief executive had a lot of reading to do on of- ficial reports and documents of all sorts. Mr. Truman boarded the Will- lamsburg yesterday afternoon, taking with him seven members of his White House staff. The yacht encountered fog and went only a little beyond Mount Vcr- non, a few miles down the Poto- mac, before dropping anchor lor the night. Red Cross Drive Edges Beyond Halfway Mark; Followup Urged 71io 1B40 Red Cross Fund Cam- paign crept over the half-way mark during Saturday, rising to a total of by Satunla- night. Oscar L. Parker, drive chair- man for Pontotoc county, after the first week of the campaign for Slfi.fiGO, urged more intensive work by the volunteers to finish the job. The drive through the down- town area is "a bout h a 1 f according to Mrs. Edith J. Stuart, executive secretary of the Red Cross here. Considerable- lag has developed in the residen- tial area, a number of blocks fin- ishing up below their quotas. Must Visit Every Home Red Cross officials here Satur- day asked that no house be passed because no one was home They expressed the belief that it i will be necessary for every to be contacted for the quota to be met, and accordingly, asked workers to arrange to call back when some member of the house- hold will be available. District workers outside Ada were requested to turn in dona- tions as soon as possible. Mrs. Stuart announced that t h e Red Cross office would remain open Saturday afternoons until the drive is over. The business district has re- ported donations totalling 05. The residential blocks have come- in with Major out- lying industries' donations cur- rently total Some from Outside Ada School districts have reported S.-j.iS. coming from Conway. Union Hill, Cedar Grove, and Horseshoe. Total from clubs amounts to with Ada Lodge No. 119, Saturday adding Fourteen dollars has been con- tributed from union labor, with the Typographical and Carpen- ters Unions contributing. Other grouns have donated S14R.50. and S32.00 was donated at the Red Cross office by various persons. About ISO businesses have con- tributed one hundred per cent. MKMPIIIS. Tenn., March Smith, president of Dixie Greyhound Lines, Inc., to- ddy offered a Sl.OOO reward for "information leading to the ar- rest and conviction" of persons responsible for the firing of shots at two Greyhound busses in west Tennessee last night. State safety commissioner as- signed 21) state highway patrol- men to investigate the shootinrs reported last night by Sheriffs Tom Lewis of Madison county and Oscar Griggs of Lauderdale county. Lewis said Ross Jackson of Murfreesboro was injured when five shots were fired into a Dixie bus south of Jackson. The other shouting occured near curve, Sheriff Griggs said. No OIK- was reported injured. Sheriff Lewis said four arrests liad been made in Jackson but no [orinal charges had been made identified the men who were nrld for questioning as former Dixie employes. On February 23 a similar In- cident involving a Dixie Grej hound bus was reported at Dyha- lie. Miss., in which no one was in- jured. The company's busses are be- ing operaedt by drivers repre sented by the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, with which Dixie recently signed a contract. Members of the Amalgamated Association of Electric Street Railway and Motor Coach em- ployes of America (AFL) have been on strike at Dixie since January 7. SAVE-TIIK-SOIL CLINIC AT O. C. IN APIIII, OKLAHOMA CITY, March 9. third annual Okla- homa Savc-The-Soil clinic will be held here April 23 and 24 and will include a one-day field tour of the Classen farm, northwest of Oklahoma City, where a com- plete soil conservation program is in operation. Read the Ada News Want Ads.' By JOHN F. CHESTER SAVANNAH, Ga.. March ol the Treasurer Fred M. Vinson declared tonight that there was urgency in estab- lishing a sound world economy in order to head off another war in which "we may not. this time, be able subdue the aggres- sors." Vinson addressed a formal din- ner staged by the Savannah Chamber of Commerce for gov- ernors of the International Bank and Monetary Fund after presid- ing at the inaugural meeting ses- sion of the twin fiscal bodies at which he stressed repeatedly the danger of war. "If wo let world economic re- lations break down again as we did in 1030. we may not. this time, be able to recover from tho Vinson said. Job For All The People "There is only one way to pro- vent war .ind depression, x x x in the last analysis it will not be the government of any nation or the designated officials of all thn nations, that will do the job. It will be all of the people through Ihe world. Governments and in- ternational institutions cannot do the job nlone." Karlier in a brief ceremony In .runt of tin- massed flags of .45 lations, Vinson told tin- covcr- lors of the bank ind fund that their's was "a race igainst time for sanity" in re- building a sound world economy and that the next war might be the last. Quick Action Urged Vinson was joined by Lord Keynes of Britain, one of the key figures of Bretton Woods, and by spokesmen for China. ranee. Mexico and Chechoslo- vakia in urging the delegates la breath life quickly into the two lending organizations designed to promote world and facili- tate foreign exchange transac- In front of them. In five close- packed rows sat the selected by their countries as directors of the project initiated at the New Hampshire meeting nearly two years ago. In a single row behind them, under a placard labeled "obser- vers, were representatives of 8 of the ten eligible nations which have not yet ratified the Bretton Woods agreements. Fedor Hystrok was the lone Russian In the row. but two of hi.i aides, one of them a young woman, sat silently behind hiitu Truman Message llrlrf A patter of applause greeted a bri( f message from President Iruman. He said the erection of a sound economy was imperative and added: l "Whether such a sound econo- mic world will be realized will :lepcnd very largely upon your individual and collective endea- i-ors. For the great arovided for at Uivetton Woods mist now become living opera- ting oruanlrms. "In this task I wish you cod- speed. You must not fail." Vinson conceded the bank and und were "not the whole an- to the world's problems, hut argued that they were "an big part of the cn- wer. He apparently warned a- nainst making too many altera- ions in the Bretton Woods plans, leclarmg that "we must not sab- tage the principles by protract- d procedure." "The world did not receive us articulary well when we began ur work." Vinson said. Greet Difficulties Ahead 'Our problem is not adaptable Continued on Page 5. Column 2) TH' PESSIMIST Dob niinki. Jr. Who recollects th.' days when cver'body in th' family ate breakfast at th' sama time? Newt Lark visited in Texas last week, th1 first time he'd been out town in years, except when Brand jury wuz meetin'.   

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